Olympics Anyone?

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
But requiring athletes to stand and salute a flag during sporting events isn’t a political act?
Isnt that just recognition of the land the event winner is from? Its respect as far as I'm concerned. It becomes political/disrespectful when the athlete has an agenda otherwise. Furthermore, if you cant respect our flag, you have no business representing the rest of us who do.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I stated they've always had a political component (I didn't define or qualify the political component)? Nor made any comment about any cause (which I may support) or political act. I just don't see the venue promoting anything productive anymore so more a distraction-how many olympics and all "political". I don't understand all the hoopla when it's always been the case. Let's play the sports is my point and leave the politics behind. When a country doesn't participate because of X cause I don't see that productive either. During the 60s and 70s olympic athletes were banned because of apartheid in South Africa (a good cause to protest for sure) but it didn't do anything as it was decades later before all that changed, the same for most protest or not participating. The political invites things like the terrorism we've seen in a number of Olympics too. It's not I don't support a protest but I'm not sure sports and especially the Olympics is the best venue to do so and now seems to invite more problems than anything good coming of it. The planet has some 40 million people globally living in slavery right now and you don't see or hear much protest about that or many global genocides , global poverty, global pandemic HIV/AIDS still going strong killing a million Africans a year I believe-so seems selective in nature. Now the Olympic Games themselves and how all that has evolved globally to winter, summer games, handicap sports, etc has been great for planet and that is what is good and what it is really all about-so my argument don't let politics spoil the soup.
 
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Juniper

Gold Member
Back on the topic

I did watch some of the opening ceremony but it just fell flat without any spectators.

I absolutely love watching the indoor Track Cycling in the velodrome, so much so I've been to events in person at the Olympic Park in London as a spectator, it's very electric and exciting. It's a real rush (excuse the pun).

The crowds play a big part in the above experience so I'm not sure it'll be the same this time around. I'll certainly be watching though and willing our lot on.
 
I used to eat, sleep and drink the Olympics as a kid…couldn’t get enough of it, my fave GB athletes were Daley Thompson, Steve Cram, and Tessa Sanderson amongst others. Lost track (and field?) of the Olympics back in the 1990’s but will still check in if it’s on tv. Don’t go out of my way to binge watch like I did as a kid though…those were great days! :unsure: :)
Those were great athletes of a great era indeed. My Track and Field idol was Seb Coe and those Coe vs. Ovett battles were epic. I actually got to meet Coe in 2013 at the Penn Relays in Philadelphia.
As for the Olympics themselves? Too formatted in terms of NBC's TV coverage, and too many fringe, goofy events have been added for the sake of money. 3 on 3, and 4 on 4 Basketball ? Really? Pro sports like tennis, and golf whoes athletes grow up aspiring to Wimbledon and the Masters, not the Olympics. And how many cities are left better off for having hosted the Olympics? At least two cities in recent years have nearly gone bankrupt after hosting them. I've learned to pick and choose what events, and how much I watch for any number of reasons.
 
I'll try to watch if NBC will allow watching through a browser. It'll be interesting to see if the life will be sucked out of the games since there will be no spectators. That's a big bummer for everyone, especially Tokyo.

Everyone is starting to realize that the Olympic games have been a huge boondoggle for most cities. That's why only one city applied for the 2024 and 2028 games (Paris and Los Angeles respectively). That says a lot right there.

I wouldn't wish the Olympics on any city. Especially LA with all it's problems, should have thought twice.

But now it's even worse...because there are no spectators. Hopefully the watchability won't be ruined, without the atmosphere and drama of having people in the crowd to cheer them on.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I went to summer olympics in Atlanta GA in 96 and that was a lot of fun-in private booth because some connection to somebody I don't remember LOL. But there was so much going on it was hard to follow all of it. My kids took gymnastics from Hayden's gym-it was run by one, or both, of the twin brothers who, one or both, were olympians in 80s as I recollect. Both were top tier athletes. Man they had those kids doing all sorts of stuff which I was awestruck.
 

The Shepherd

Well-known member
I don't believe that any judged "sport" should be included in the Olympics, that includes gymnastics, diving, synchronized anything, etc. Unfortunately, those events are popular and shown on the TV much more that the triple jump or the hammer throw. To me it's all about the fastest, farthest and highest and not the most artistic.

So, not watching much here.
 

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
Was mates at University with a girl whose Dad who competed in the rowing at multiple Olympics (and World Championships) and her Mum was at a similar level:


Their daughter was also a very serious rower but due to childhood illnesses that had left long-last repercussions didn't compete much. Ironically the rowing club at Uni wouldn't accommodate her medical needs (not having any clue about her lineage!). Their loss.

My point is that although they were long-retired from rowing by the time I knew them, it was something that was still clearly a huge part of their lives and at various points had been all that they did for long periods of time. The level of dedication, training and sheer bloody-mindedness must have been phenomenal. I have enormous respect for anybody that makes one, singularly focused thing their life for a period of time and having done a bit of rowing, the levels of fitness and sheer hours spent training must have been immense.

Fitness sports like rowing and cycling, as a nearly-20-Stone, poorly-motivated, overeating slug I find mind-blowing.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
There is a huge decline in pro sports and college support in US- was happening before COVID. I’m not sure if across all ages or a generational thing but a big decline in sports interest , and i think without spectators it will decline more. Education in US schools is tanking also and maybe it’s a general decline.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Fitness sports like rowing and cycling, as a nearly-20-Stone, poorly-motivated, overeating slug I find mind-blowing.
c.1975, I was 19 years old, wandering around the campus quad at UCSB during “campus day” or whatever it was called. All the SROs (student run organizations) had tables and booths out, fishing for students that would join their surf club/beach volleyball club/debate club/AM-FM radio club/Crew club/etc.

The crew club had a couple photos out on the table that showed guys in a 4-man shell floating on a beautiful lake, backlit, sparkly, clean, nestled in the mountains. I took the bait. A week later I found myself in a weight room. I’d never even touched a weight or dumbbell in my life. A few days later I found myself in a boat with 8 others (coxswain counts!) on Lake Cachuma amidst all the beauty I‘d seen in those photos. I was hooked. A few days later I was running six miles. I quit smoking pot that day. And I learned that six miles is nothing to those who run. It’s a 30-minute break. I’d never run farther than 400 meters and I had to be taught “how to run” so that I wouldn’t trash my knees.

Rowing is unlike any other team sport. While racing, everyone does the same thing, at the same time. There is no glory-guy. Narcissists are never found on an established crew team. They leave as soon as they realize no one is special in the sport. Another attribute: team mates are there to help other team mates improve their strength, skill set, endurance, power, etc. When one man improves, the boat goes faster, so accountability and teamwork are critical to success.

A typical 2 kilometer race lasts about 6 minutes. A typical college crew team races 10–15 times per year. That’s 90 minutes of racing. Training is 2 hours on the water and an hour in the weight room or on the running trail. Every day. That’s ~720 hours of training for 90 minutes of racing. That statistic alone weeds out many people.
 

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
@cbphoto I grew up in coastal(ish) town and played a lot of Rugby. A lot. I would train two or three times a week and play two games at the weekend when it was at its peak for me and I wouldn't think anything of doing 80 minutes each game. When I was 16, I saw the end of the season approaching and decided to try something else - so I went down to the local rowing club (which was on the Thames) and tried it. I did it for about six months and had a great time - learning in a 2-man tub, moving up to a fine 4 (the club didn't have any heavy 8s and I was 16 stone then) and going up and down the river with the container ships occasionally rocking us with their wakes. It was heavily tidal too - so you'd row three miles with the tide then suddenly realise on the way back that you were barely making anything each stroke. I even enjoyed the indoor Concept 2 machines and would happily do 10K without thinking. Obviously after such a short time doing it my technique needed work but my peak output was always decent (I have legs like absolute tree trunks - I'm physically built as a rower, probably due to my Rugby playing position at Second Row for many years).

I never liked running but I did like rowing. Unfortunately shortly afterwards I ended up having some serious mental health issues and never managed to get back into it. It's something that I regret and at some point I'd like to get a second-hand indoor machine to get my basic fitness back to a level where I could give it another go.

Always in awe at those that put the kind of effort into it like you have. It's just a different way of life.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Was mates at University with a girl whose Dad who competed in the rowing at multiple Olympics (and World Championships
That's pretty cool. I used to work with an Olympic middle distance runner:


We both played on our companies flag football team. I could outrun him for about 25 yards. Once he caught me, dude was gone.

A typical 2 kilometer race lasts about 6 minutes. A typical college crew team races 10–15 times per year. That’s 90 minutes of racing. Training is 2 hours on the water and an hour in the weight room or on the running trail. Every day. That’s ~720 hours of training for 90 minutes of racing. That statistic alone weeds out many people.
This is right in line with my daily routine when I was gigging. 2-3 hours daily of running my feet and going fast. Made a 45 minute show a breeze.
 

wraub

Well-known member
I saw some of the opening ceremony- I quite liked some of the stadium-sized visuals, when the tv director was nice enough to show them instead of closeups of the performers. As usual, tv tends to minimize the best and maximize the worst of almost any event. The lack of spectators was somewhat jarring.

I've been aware of the darker side of the IOC for some time now, and aware that there are two Olympics- the actual athletics, and activities for those who use the games to travel a bit, exploit new things and cultures, appreciate young fit people, and launder money.

It can make it hard to enjoy the games, but the athleticism always wins me over. The years of effort, the heartbreak of a stumble, the elation on a winner's face... the real stuff is still real. I like that.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I only joined in because I thought this was a discussion about 1960s and 70s Premier made drums 😉
Unfortunately no. In my 45 years on the planet, I have never seen in person ANY Premier set. The only Olympics I know of are the games.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
Unfortunately no. In my 45 years on the planet, I have never seen in person ANY Premier set. The only Olympics I know of are the games.
This is sad to hear Mr Insane Polack especially as I've owned 2 made in England sets (one of them twice) and 2 of their later Asian made Genista reissues. This thread has only strengthened my efforts to buy a UK made Genista if I get the chance, but only if it's got a floor tom as opposed to a 14" hanging tom , which covers the majority of what I've seen locally for sale.
 
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