Old Gretsch snare drum

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
I did some research this morning to find out exactly what age my Gretsch SD is. Turns out they changed badges from round to "stop sign #1" in 1971. The serial number is "00286" and for the model it just has a handwritten "8T" so I assume it's the 4108 model standard aluminum shell 8-lug SD. I guessing that this is a drum from 1971 or perhaps 1972 considering the fact that the serial number is so low. The problem is, it's really beat-up and scratched and it has a Ludwig strainer instead of the original Gretsch.

Funny thing is, I actually lost this drum for a year or so. I forgot it at a practice studio, went back the next day and asked about it. Nobody knew anything about it. About a year later, maybe more, I rented some time at the studio with a band and decided to just use the house drum-set. I get into the room and see that my snare drum has been there the whole time being used with their house kit (they have several). Luckily, they were nice enough to give it back.

Anybody know what this thing is worth? It isn't in pristine shape by any stretch of the imagination, but it's functional and sounds good.



 
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tamadrm

Platinum Member
That drum was Gretsch's answer to the Lugwig acrolite.In that condition with a non original Ludwig P-85 strainer.....not much.You might be lucky to get 100 for it.Most will agree that those drums don't sound as good as the acrolite.I would keep it as a backup snare.Change the heads,and ditch the duct tape.

Steve B
 

opentune

Platinum Member
That drums a keeper and actually kind of rare. Not too many kicking around on auctions.
The drum will also sound much better, or at least sound like a snare, with a new head, ...and of course without the duct tape.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
That drum was Gretsch's answer to the Lugwig acrolite.In that condition with a non original Ludwig P-85 strainer.....not much.You might be lucky to get 100 for it.Most will agree that those drums don't sound as good as the acrolite.I would keep it as a backup snare.Change the heads,and ditch the duct tape.

Steve B
-- It's been my back-up snare for awhile. I was just curious how collectible it is. The crazy thing about this drum is how hard it is to change the heads. They are so incredibly tight that I have to use a screwdriver and a hammer to chisel it off. It has many gashes on the edge near the rim from doing this. I used to have a thin muffling ring but I lost it and that's why the duct tape is there. Thanks for the advice. I think you're right.

That drums a keeper and actually kind of rare. Not too many kicking around on auctions.
The drum will also sound much better, or at least sound like a snare, with a new head, ...and of course without the duct tape.
--The only place I found it was in a 1971 online catalog from the Gretsch drums website. It was part of a drum kit. I know, I need to get a new head on it. I didn't know it was so rare. It's probably almost impossible to find that original strainer assembly.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
You guys have any idea where I can get an original type strainer for this drum? It still sits around, without the duct tape on it. I put an Evans HD Dry on it with a Diplomat snare side. Seems to have tamed it quite well.

I'm thinking of bringing it to Professional Drum Shop someday and maybe just get some advice there. Maybe the guy there can work his magic on it like he did with my Acrolite. Sure, it's rare, but it's all ugly and scratched up. Nostalgia binds me to it though because I got it with the first drum deal I ever made when I started playing at 12 years old. It still sounds great and it doesn't matter on a recording how it looks.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I see parts all of the time on Ebay when I search for Gretsch snares. On the filter, click Least Expensive first and it will list parts normally.
 
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