Not sure what the money beat is?

Hewitt2

Senior Member
In my early days as a drummer, when my lessons moved beyond the practice pad alone to incorporate kit training, AC/DC was among the first bands I practiced to. I've always seen Phil Rudd as a backbeat master. His judgement is superb, and he executes rather complex timing with the greatest of facility. His work is really quite misleading. Some claim he oversimplifies, but that charge is itself a grave oversimplification.

Yessir. It's no coincidence that Back in Black went something like 25x platinum in the US. The drumming on that album is damn near perfect with not a note out of place and the dynamics perfectly suited to the songs. It takes real skill to nail that aggressive feel but maintain a sense of swing.

He's kind of like the hard rock Ringo (albeit more straight ahead)...
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Yessir. It's no coincidence that Back in Black went something like 25x platinum in the US. The drumming on that album is damn near perfect with not a note out of place and the dynamics perfectly suited to the songs. It takes real skill to nail that aggressive feel but maintain a sense of swing.

He's kind of like the hard rock Ringo (albeit more straight ahead)...

If I were to select a single term to describe his body of work, I'd choose "disciplined." You're dead on about his notes never being out of place. It would be quite tempting to embellish some of those parts, but he always takes the sensible route and plays exactly what needs to be played. His style results from a keen comprehension of what matters and what doesn't behind a drum kit. There are drummers out there with incredible technical still who don't have an inkling of Rudd's compositional acumen.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
I mostly play progressive rock, jazz fusion and straight-ahead jazz. The "money beat" for the most part doesn't even exist in these genres. But I agree that if you're playing music that calls for the money beat, then you should just play the money beat. If you want to liven it up a little, that's probably okay as long as we're talking just a pinch of salt or a dash of pepper. Not a flaming béchamel with caviar and a truffle purée.
 
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Hewitt2

Senior Member
I mostly play progressive rock, jazz fusion and straight-ahead jazz. The "money beat" for the most part doesn't even exist in these genres. But I agree that if you're playing music that calls for the money beat, then you should just play the money beat.

What? A swinging ride pattern wouldn't be considered a money beat in straight-ahead jazz? To me that is the quintessential money beat and all over recordings from the swing and bop eras. That beat practically defines those eras along with a walking bass pattern.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
What? A swinging ride pattern wouldn't be considered a money beat in straight-ahead jazz? To me that is the quintessential money beat and all over recordings from the swing and bop eras. That beat practically defines those eras along with a walking bass pattern.
I suppose that depends on your definition of "money beat". I took it to mean the typical Boom BAP Boom-Boom BAP groove (or similar) you hear all over standard rock. But yes, to your point, a typical swinging ride pattern could be considered the jazz equivalent of the money beat.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I’m not surprised some people aren’t getting this. Heck, 86 posts in a little over a day. Can I bring it or what? ?
<sigh>

@Bo Eder please post a video of you playing the money beat. I have no idea what you mean.
 

doggyd69b

Well-known member
AC DC going platinum means nothing, Justin Beiber went platinum just because an artist goes platinum does not make them good musicians it just makes them rich. In Mexico for example there are bands that literally play only one note the whole song and they have over 40 albums released.. They both have written some of the stupidest music ever.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
AC DC going platinum means nothing, Justin Beiber went platinum just because an artist goes platinum does not make them good musicians it just makes them rich. In Mexico for example there are bands that literally play only one note the whole song and they have over 40 albums released.. They both have written some of the stupidest music ever.

Back in black is rightly revered as a hard rock classic and I and many others believe that the drumming on that album elevated the music and made it sound great.

So I don’t understand why you are bringing up Justin bieber or Mexican one note bands?

Unless you feel ac/dc also makes “some of the stupidest music ever?”
 

felonious69

Well-known member
If the drummer who recorded a given song doesn't play it the exact same way in every live performance, why should I aspire to a standard he ignores? It's like joining a cult that not even the leader takes seriously.

This note-for-note-replication-of-fills business is an issue that means a lot more to drummers than it does to anyone else. What's important is maintaining the groove and timing of a song. Your doing a fill on your snare that the original drummer did on a tom is a trivial deviation that has little meaning in the practical world. I have never been told, "Dude, that fill should have been on your 12" tom, not on your snare." C'mon, people. Let's all get real.
If I go to a concert and it all sounds "just like the album" I could have saved myself some dollars, because I already own the album. LOTS of dollars these days!
 
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