Not enough channels

carolkett

New member
My band is wanting to downsize from a Soundcraft Signature 22 to something easier to transport. We potentially need 8 channels for drum mics, 5 vocals, we occasionally mic guitar amp, and we have two keyboards. I’m no audio engineer and could use some suggestions on what size board to get. We want analog. I have an 8 channel stage box but it’s still 8 channels. Should I get a separate mixer if we get a 12 channel board? And how does it connect to main mixer?
 

calan

Silver Member
You need the amount of channels you need. I don't think anybody here is going to advocate sub mixing as permanent option, and it's counter intuitive anyway.

If you're looking for easier transport, running an analog mixer into another is a lateral move at best.

You're probably better off looking at digital mixers.
 

carolkett

New member
We had a Behringer X32 which was great when we hired a soundman, but terrible when we tried to run it ourselves. No one was willing to learn how to use it.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
Analogue-wise this form factor already is the smallest option since knobs and faders come with a physical size and the board only has 16 mic ins. There's not much groups in the console and the master section isn't that wide, too. 8 + 5 + guitar amps already is close to 16 mic ins, so no chance for a significantly smaller option here if it has to be analogue with AUX/FX busses and EQ.
 

calan

Silver Member
No one was willing to learn how to use it.
Seems you've found the most direct solution to the problem. Too bad you already moved to another board and are contemplating yet another move.

I am sympathetic that the digital interface can be daunting at first, but it's just a hump. In the long term, creating using a pre set for your group that will just require tweaks for the venue is going to save time and reduce stress.
 

carolkett

New member
I’m still confused—can one analog board hook up to another to result in more channels? Or to result in a separate mix added? Or something like that? :) Or none of the above lol? The Behringer XR18 was recently recommended. Digital, but smaller and maybe we could buckle down.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
The Behringer X18 only has 16 mic ins plus a (unbalanced?) stereo input, so no second keyboard without a sub-mixer. Carrying around two consoles to me doesn't look like reduction. Also there's no way to "join" or share a mix between both, you can only hand over a sub-mix from one console into the other. In that case: what about FX and what about AUX channels? If the Behringer X18 concept is okay for you, take a look at the Soundcraft UI24R, this would then be a perfect match, also sounding way better.
 

calan

Silver Member
Yes, you *can* run your main or aux outs into another board. You could run that into another board, and so on ad infinitum.

The child board doesn't bequeath more channels to the parent board in the literal sense, but it can be a method of increasing the amount of available mic preamps.

It can also introduce more headaches and make the signal chain more difficult to troubleshoot.
 

calan

Silver Member
take a look at the Soundcraft UI24R, this would then be a perfect match, also sounding way better.
Pictured is my UI24r setup. The touchscreen monitor is my own addition, of course.

FWIW, I find the GUI on the soundcraft to be a bit more intuitive than the X series, as well as a bit more responsive.
 

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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
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I use this Yamaha TF rack digital console with add-on TIO-1608-D stage box. The TF itself has 16 inputs and 16 outputs, and the TIO box adds an additional 16 inputs and another 8 outputs. So in a 6-space rack, I’m running a 32-input/24-output board.

it’s a shame you want to stay analog because once you cross the digital bridge you’ll wonder why you hadn’t done it sooner. In my Devo tribute band, everything is running through the console and we have our own in-ear monitor mixes, then I give the venue sound guy a stereo feed and a sub feed and hand him the iPad to mix front of house.

but the bigger selling point is the optional input presets, and save able scenes. This means I can hire out to other bands, create their mix, and save it. So my Devo mix is saved while I work with other bands. My sound checks hardly ever last more than 15 minutes.
 

rebonn

Senior Member
Pictured is my UI24r setup. The touchscreen monitor is my own addition, of course.

FWIW, I find the GUI on the soundcraft to be a bit more intuitive than the X series, as well as a bit more responsive.

THIS
 

rebonn

Senior Member
I was hell-bent on never using a digital board. The Behringer X32 is so complicated. This right here is simple and sounds amazing.

This seems like something I would of liked, simple, compact, (no tablet required) (no rack required) and was runner up when I was shopping for a mixer. However it's twice as much as the Ui24R. The 8 and 16 version didn't do it for me so I got the Soundcraft and it's at least easy to use.
 

KEEF

Senior Member
I was hell-bent on never using a digital board. The Behringer X32 is so complicated. This right here is simple and sounds amazing.

We have the Touchmix (16) - fantastic bit of kit, loads of top end features but very easy to navigate and no bigger than a laptop
 

Fred D

Pioneer Member
I've had a Touch Mix 30 pro for 2 years now. Great board. I use it every day. Tons of top end features. It records really well. I do everything on it. Don't use or need a DAW.
 
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Timmy

Well-known member
I've had a Touch Mix 30 pro for 2 years now. Great board. I use it every day. Tons of top end features. It records really well. I do everything on it. Don't use or need a DAW.
I am soooo close to pulling the trigger on this. I think it's a steal.
 

Fred D

Pioneer Member
I am soooo close to pulling the trigger on this. I think it's a steal.
You should, it's a great mixer. If you plan on recording you'll need an external hard drive. I use a solid state Samsung. They're about a hundred bucks. I use it when soft ware updates become available too, There are a bunch of tutorials on You Tube to help you get started.
 

Timmy

Well-known member
You should, it's a great mixer. If you plan on recording you'll need an external hard drive. I use a solid state Samsung. They're about a hundred bucks. I use it when soft ware updates become available too, There are a bunch of tutorials on You Tube to help you get started.
I have a Samsung SSD as well (2 TB, T3). Yes, I have already started watching the tutorials. Thing is amazing. You can be the soundguy when need be as well. I will probably get their amped speakers/PAs as well. Trying to figure how big I want to go. lol (Buy once cry once).
 
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