No Respect

TheDrumster

Senior Member
I was reading this article by Chris Chase on usatoday.com where he berates a kicker for calling Tim Tebow one of the worst quarterbacks he's ever seen. All was well until he tried to compare a kicker on a football team with a drummer in a band...essentially call both the "least respected members" of the group.

http://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/04/tim-tebow-jay-feely-worst-quarterback-ever-seen-jim-rome-clip

Anyway, it got me thinking whether others have experienced such sentiment in real life. Of course there are the jokes, "Q: what do you call someone who likes to hang out with musicians? A: a drummer."

Personally, I have mostly experienced positive vibes from band members and others, but I think there is a feeling among some that drummers do not quite deserve the same level of respect as other musicians....
 

Jhostetler

Senior Member
Interesting article. I've experienced some of that myself. Once, a guy had the nerve to tell me as I was tuning my snare, "Why do you guys bother with tuning your drums? They all sound the same. All you do is hit them... etc." He of course was this "fantastic singer" that knew everything.

But to the point: I do think that most people have the idea that drumming in a band is probably the easiest to do when compared to the rest of the group. My girlfriend is a Music Education major, and is a vocal primary. She's told me that her percussion tech class was the most unexpectedly difficult class to take.

A lot of it has to do with the fact that you usually cannot here a readily discernible melody when standing in front of a drum kit. Basses, Guitars, Singers; you can hear pitches being raised and lowered. Drums, typically you simply hear the rhythm. Thus; the assumption that drums must be easy to play as we are not dealing with discernible pitch.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I don't think it's just about drummers, jabs and jibes are made about singers, bass players, guitar players, and the proverbial trombone player with a beeper. I certainly don't take any of it personally, and none of the perceptions appear to have changed what I do.

Bermuda
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
But to the point: I do think that most people have the idea that drumming in a band is probably the easiest to do when compared to the rest of the group.
That perception may have something to do with the lack of a melodic factor, but I find that most people are quite amazed by the ability to use 4 limbs at once, which I find quite natural. Truly, it's all relative.

Bermuda
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Generally I think drummers get plenty of respect from other musicians. Especially when these other musicians have played for many years and have had to play with bad drummers.

The thing that annoys me, is how little camera coverage drummers get when camera operators (actually production staff) are filming and covering live concerts.

It seems to me that watching drummers play is at least as interesting as watching guitar players play. They usually put the drummer on a riser, but then the camera operator never gets close to the drummer to show close ups of them playing. I watch a lot of music shows on TV and I get really really frustrated about this !



.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
TV coverage of any player usually depends on how camera-friendly they are. If a player looks bored, they probably won't get much screen time (unless they also happen to be singing lead.) Also remember that when someone is singing, or soloing, they tend to get the most coverage because that's where the action is.

Bermuda
 

Jhostetler

Senior Member
It's also interesting for me to see the differences in music genres as far as who gets the most credit. Take for example, the blues. Almost always, the lead guitarist is the one getting the most attention. Move over to jazz, and it's often the saxes or horns. In funk you have the bassist. Granted, these are vague stereotypes, but like Bermuda said, it's all relative.
 

tcspears

Gold Member
I got this one recently:
Q: What's the difference between a drummer and a pizza?
A: A pizza can actually feed a family of four

Anyways... I think all musicians have their stereotypes. Drummers don't have any personality and just hit things, lead guitartists just do whatever they want, singers are all nazis, trumpet players are all coke heads, et cetera...

I think they are pretty light hearted stereotypes and never take them personally. We might not have to worry about key changes, but we do have to worry about dynamics, interplay, rhythm, and melody just like everyone else.

I will say that you see this a little less in jazz, where the drummer has a more equal part in the interplay of a song, but it's still there.
 

Acidline303

Senior Member
As a drummer raised near Cleveland OH, I can tell you, you just have to take jabs made from widespread social stereotypes with ten pounds of salt.
 

Acidline303

Senior Member
Also...when it comes to "no respect" Chris Chase has ZERO room to dole out insults to anyone. If you follow the internet meme train of people bagging on his yahoo career, or just google "chris chase sucks" you'll see what i mean.
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Chris Chase is a "Sports Blog Editor".... It challenges my imagination to try to understand why this man's opinion would be of any consequence.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
After spending a lot of time recently on a bass player forum, I notice that a certain core of them spend A LOT of time tearing down drummers for being ham-fisted half-wits, keyboard players' left hands for hogging their precious sonic space, guitar players (aka, "guitards") for being wanky show-off hacks, and clueless diva singers ... as if bass players are some secret society of unsung heroes and music's only saving grace.

I really hate that sort of thing.

Why would anyone want to be a musician if they can't conjure the respect for anyone else in the band or the roles their instruments play? I suspect the most vocal of them don't play out much and probably wouldn't have anything interesting to contribute, anyway.

I'm really glad the culture of this forum doesn't seem terribly interested in tearing apart every other band member like that. I'm hard-pressed to imagine a more unhealthy attitude to bring into a band.

Not to rag on bass players (being one myself), but I just can't get my head around that.

Probably worth pointing out that they don't all do that (far from it) but to see it at all, and going unchecked, seems like madness.
 
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Blisco

Senior Member
I've asked or had the other three members in my band sit behind my kit for a "sound check". I ask them to play hard and hit like I would. The fumbling, limp-wristed attempts at playing a beat are all that needs to be said.

I may not be able to do their job, but they sure as heck can't do mine.

Plus, we have all seen a great band with a weak drummer. And we all know how that translates into our perception of the band. Drummers are the heart and soul. No doubt about it.

This kind of thing and the jokes don't bother me at all. I usually ask the guys to check for drool to verify my riser is level LOL
 

tcspears

Gold Member
Why would anyone want to be a musician if they can't conjure the respect for anyone else in the band or the roles their instruments play?
I've always seen this as "ball busting." It's just a way for profesisonals to tease each other. I worked as a cook for a number of years, and you see this in the restaurant business too. Cooks constantly teasing each other, then turning on the waitstaff. Meanwhile the waitstaff is picking on the kitchen for being too slow or brainless...

I think this sort of harmless teasing is pretty common in most jobs, be it music, or cooking, or construction, et cetera... I'm sure if someone actually had an issue with someone's ability they wouldn't be teasing them, they'd just fire them.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I'm surprised so many in the football world still consider kickers insignificant when so many super bowls have come down to a made or missed FG.

As for drummers, given how much music is made without actual drums these days, it's not surprising drummers are often given little respect
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I think this sort of harmless teasing is pretty common in most jobs, be it music, or cooking, or construction, et cetera... I'm sure if someone actually had an issue with someone's ability they wouldn't be teasing them, they'd just fire them.
I get what you're saying and that sort of teasing definitely exists in my line of work, but there's usually a note of something mean about it that follows the predictable mold of, "if you can't make yourself look good, then take down the ones that do look good." I don't know if it's an American thing, but going for the cheap laugh at someone else's expense is just bad form, IMO. I won't even bother with the courtesy chuckle in those cases - crickets are all you'll get from me.

I wouldn't subject myself to any mean-spirited ball-busting if it smacked of something rude cowardly couched in a "joke".

If someone has a chip on their shoulder regarding drummers, then I ignore them when I can, or if they're someone I play with, I cut and run.

Life's too short to fight against ignorant stereotypes all the time.
 

Acidline303

Senior Member
I'm surprised so many in the football world still consider kickers insignificant when so many super bowls have come down to a made or missed FG.
Five words. NFL All-Time Scoring Leaders

Points Leaders
RK PLAYER PTS
1 Morten Andersen 2,544
2 Gary Anderson 2,434
3 Jason Hanson 2,150
4 ADAM VINATIERI 2,146
5 John Carney 2,062
6 Matt Stover 2,004
7 George Blanda 2,002
8 Jason Elam 1,983
9 John Kasay 1,970
10 Norm Johnson 1,736
11 DAVID AKERS 1,721
12 Nick Lowery 1,711
13 Jan Stenerud 1,699
14 Ryan Longwell 1,687
15 Lou Groza 1,608
16 Eddie Murray 1,594
17 Al Del Greco 1,584
18 SEBASTIAN JANIKOWSKI 1,574
19 Olindo Mare 1,555
20 PHIL DAWSON 1,519
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
My bass player friends makes his own bass guitars and he wants a mural painted on one bass with dead musicians from the 70's. I suggested Bonham and he just scoffed and said, no, no drummers.

A drummer....yeah, right. What was I thinking?
 
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