No more tom angles for me!

JT1

Silver Member
Well last night at band practice i thought to myself whilst playing, you know why do my fills feel so difficult to play when i play them and i've had my toms on an angle pretty much during my entire drumming life...until yesterday.

I thought what would it be like to play almost flat but not completely flat and the difference was literally unreal, it feels a bit awkward at first but everything is so much better, the sounds of the toms are instantly better, the rebound feels so much better, and it even feels more comfortable despite it being much flatter. I used to read comments on the tom angles thread about how unnecessary it is having your toms on quite a large angle and used to think well it is necessary for me, if only i had listened and tried this sooner.

I want to thank all players on here that pointed that out, it sure has made a large difference and has made me a lot happier.

I have also started to look at my grip too (thanks to certain posters), as i have a tendency to loose stamina when needing to play quick hi hat patterns and i have realised that my grip has been quite bad and uncomfortable for some time now (it takes me 7 years to realise these things =P) so i really looked in depth at how drum teachers hold their sticks, both on youtube and in real life and it is making a huge difference to my playing.

So thank you drummerworld for inspiring me to sort out my problems and to try something new! =)

JT
 

mrbling

Silver Member
me too i did this about a year ago its another of the things my guitarist hates cos he always does rim shots (I dont :)) it is much better. recently i put my tom on a snare stand well i have my 5.5" snare as low as it can go on my old pearl snare stand and now how my tom as low ass it will go an a tama omniball standlike an inch in hight difference and its so easy to play it meant my hats went further over but not much and its my perfect set up i did this about a month ago and i will never change it !
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
There comes a time for all of us when angles won't cut it anymore.
I played steep angles for many years because I just didn't know better. There was no place like DW when I was younger. I only stopped using angles a few years ago when I got back into drumming after not playing for many years and I found this site.
 

Bernhard

Founder Drummerworld
Staff member
We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

Bernhard
 

eddiehimself

Platinum Member
me too i did this about a year ago its another of the things my guitarist hates cos he always does rim shots (I dont :)) it is much better. recently i put my tom on a snare stand well i have my 5.5" snare as low as it can go on my old pearl snare stand and now how my tom as low ass it will go an a tama omniball standlike an inch in hight difference and its so easy to play it meant my hats went further over but not much and its my perfect set up i did this about a month ago and i will never change it !
what have we told you about listening to that guitar player!? Lolz

My 1 up tom is kind of getting less steep as time goes by, don't know if i'm prepared for totally flat just yet but y'know i reckon i might put it close at least.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
It's a compromise for me because I want my toms as close as possible with without too much tilt. In my Ian Paice-dominated youth I wanted a smooth slope from share to the first mounted tom so I could more readily play those booga-booga-booga-booga fills down the toms.

Now that I'm a slow old biddy I should try harder to flatten them out more. I use sticks with an acorn-shaped bead, so only tilting the toms slightly should result in more of the bead's surface area touching the skin with a natural stroke, and that theoretically gives you a richer tone.

Was Bill B one of the first to have flat toms? He claimed it was better ergonomically than normal configurations. Here's one of the fab Mr B's setup:



Hey bling, that mounted tom looks like hard work to me. You'd really need to lift your elbow or set your stool up high..
 

Fiery

Silver Member
For me it's a state of constant change. Flatter toms sound and rebound better, but after a certain points every hit becomes a rimshot. To make things worse, my angle of approach varies depending on the power of the strokes, so what works when playing soft won't work so well when playing hard and vice versa. And, of course, tom and snare angles are a function of their relative height compared to the sitting height.
All this being said, my toms and snare tend to be flatter and higher than most of the other local drummers I've seen (and I practice at a rehearsal studio so I get to see and try out a lot of other drummers' setups).

Edit: This picture depicts quite well the height and angle my toms tend to be at:
 
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BassDriver

Silver Member
Have you noticed that taller drummers tend to find flatter tom angles more comfortable.

My toms are at quite an angle for most drummers to bear but I don't have much choice in adjusting them, I know I don't have extra deep toms like the drummers in those pics have but the last time I tried to adjust the tom stands ended up hurting my fingers, my back and I just putting the toms back to the way they were before.

I wonder if I placed my med-tom down low and had a 1 up 2 down setup with 10", 12" and 14" toms.

It would enable me to put my 18" crash-ride down lower over my bass drum.

Unfortunately I don't know if that is possible with my tom stands (without buying anything more).
 

Average

Senior Member
Ergonomics works for drumming too! Way to go. I learned almost everything I needed to know about ergonomics from Ed Soph, although I used to angle my snare away from me because I played traditional grip and it was easier. He made fun of me for angling it that way. The other day I saw a video of him and guess how he had his snare set up. HA! Just goes to show you that thinking can change over time.

Well last night at band practice i thought to myself whilst playing, you know why do my fills feel so difficult to play when i play them and i've had my toms on an angle pretty much during my entire drumming life...until yesterday.

I thought what would it be like to play almost flat but not completely flat and the difference was literally unreal, it feels a bit awkward at first but everything is so much better, the sounds of the toms are instantly better, the rebound feels so much better, and it even feels more comfortable despite it being much flatter. I used to read comments on the tom angles thread about how unnecessary it is having your toms on quite a large angle and used to think well it is necessary for me, if only i had listened and tried this sooner.

I want to thank all players on here that pointed that out, it sure has made a large difference and has made me a lot happier.

I have also started to look at my grip too (thanks to certain posters), as i have a tendency to loose stamina when needing to play quick hi hat patterns and i have realised that my grip has been quite bad and uncomfortable for some time now (it takes me 7 years to realise these things =P) so i really looked in depth at how drum teachers hold their sticks, both on youtube and in real life and it is making a huge difference to my playing.

So thank you drummerworld for inspiring me to sort out my problems and to try something new! =)

JT
 

JT1

Silver Member
We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

We need pictures!!!

Bernhard
I will post some pics of my set up lol. Glad to see i am not the only enlightened drummer here =P!
 

joeneau

Member
Surely the toms are easier to strike when they are at an angle?

I always assumed it was just a fasion thing to put them flatter (and consquencially lower to avoid rim shotting) and also miss of the second mounted tom......

It seems like it has little benifit than to make the drummer more visable behind the kit and higher up in relation to it.

it means you can't mount the toms ontop of the bass drum any more....they have to be on separate stands and to the sides to get them low enough....

is it worth it?

=s
 

gusty

Platinum Member
Surely the toms are easier to strike when they are at an angle?

I always assumed it was just a fasion thing to put them flatter (and consquencially lower to avoid rim shotting) and also miss of the second mounted tom......

It seems like it has little benifit than to make the drummer more visable behind the kit and higher up in relation to it.

it means you can't mount the toms ontop of the bass drum any more....they have to be on separate stands and to the sides to get them low enough....

is it worth it?

=s
It's all in relation to the angle you hit them on, which is affected by how tall you are and how high up you sit. Probably other things as well, too tired right now to think much.
 

imispgh

Senior Member
Have you noticed that taller drummers tend to find flatter tom angles more comfortable.

My toms are at quite an angle for most drummers to bear but I don't have much choice in adjusting them, I know I don't have extra deep toms like the drummers in those pics have but the last time I tried to adjust the tom stands ended up hurting my fingers, my back and I just putting the toms back to the way they were before.

I wonder if I placed my med-tom down low and had a 1 up 2 down setup with 10", 12" and 14" toms.

It would enable me to put my 18" crash-ride down lower over my bass drum.

Unfortunately I don't know if that is possible with my tom stands (without buying anything more).

I am 6"6" tall and like everyhting as close as possible (this is why I use an Ultra-Adjust Hi-Hat and a virgin bass set up. I will go to 15" hi-hats soon as well). Due to a back problem I also have a modified throne that lets me lean back a little in the seat. All of this lets me play with minimum movement. Seems to me that if I went with flat tome they would have to go very low and i would have to sit up straight and even lean forward on occassion? isn't the right place for your equipment to be the location you land on playing with no drums? Air drum with sticks and play - where do you tips land?
 

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Fiery

Silver Member
Surely the toms are easier to strike when they are at an angle?
You'll notice that all the setups posted on this thread still have the toms at an angle ;)
Beginner drummers tend to angle the toms a lot so the front of the rims are closer to the snare and it's easier to go from one to another. This might seem more comfortable at first, but the result is that the sticks hit the heads at an angle which diminishes the sound, feel and rebound, and shortens the life of the batter heads.
Toms should be placed at such an angle that the sticks are as close as possible to being parallel to the heads at the point of impact (without striking a rimshot, of course). As gusty pointed out, this is a function of how high the drummer sits in relation to the toms - the higher the toms, the more angled they will be, and vice versa.
 

imispgh

Senior Member
You'll notice that all the setups posted on this thread still have the toms at an angle ;)
Beginner drummers tend to angle the toms a lot so the front of the rims are closer to the snare and it's easier to go from one to another. This might seem more comfortable at first, but the result is that the sticks hit the heads at an angle which diminishes the sound, feel and rebound, and shortens the life of the batter heads.
Toms should be placed at such an angle that the sticks are as close as possible to being parallel to the heads at the point of impact (without striking a rimshot, of course). As gusty pointed out, this is a function of how high the drummer sits in relation to the toms - the higher the toms, the more angled they will be, and vice versa.
Understood but that depends on the angle of the stick correct? If the stick is held at an angle but still somewhat parallel to the head what's the difference?
 

Thunderstix

Senior Member
Well, they can never be completely flat or you'll be hitting the rims all the time. Even my snare needs a small tilt. The higher up, the more tilt. So a large person will need more tilt.

But I agree, too much tilt hampers the rebound.
 
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