Next move after a string of bad luck with breaking my Paiste 2002s

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Ghostnote

Guest
I was using a 16 and 3/8ths long version of the Vic Firth Rock model that I got Straightsticks to make me, but the weight was too far forward and I would pit my heads very quickly and I dented the bells on my 24" GB Multi, my 24" Big Ride, and my 20" Novo China. The long taper and elongated tip of the Abe Laboriel stick really work well and I haven't had any problems with heads or cymbals since I switched. I'm looking for a company to make me a 16 and 5/8ths long version, but have yet to find one that'll make them for me.
 

Brian

Gold Member
Bummer, man. I hope the Z's or whatever you pick up, work out for you.

My only experience with Paste was a 15" 2002 crash I had from the 80s. It was med weight and very bright and loud. My first crash cymbal and I bashed it for 20 years before selling it. It was quite durable. Have a 602 splash but rarely play it.

Now I recently purchased 2002 SE hats and are on layaway, so I am curious about these durability claims.

I've also never heard of denting ride cymbal bells...that must be some hard hitting.
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
I am still running all Paiste cymbals on the kit for now. I have quite a few Zildjians as backup.

I think the 2002 SE hats should be fine most normal playing. I was mainly referencing that most Zildjian hats are a good nit heavier overall when compared to Paiste hats.

And I have never dented a bell of any cymbal. Occasionally you come across this phenomenon, but I have to imagine it is due to something other than playing that does the damage. Now, I have heard quite a bit about people denting the edge of their Paiste Big Beat cymbals.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
Only down side is thinner cymbals tend not to project as well. When I saw Black Sabbath last month, their drummer (can't remember his name, but he was a stellar choice (Bill who? Haha)) used larger, thinner Meinls and honestly, they were the only part of the kit that didn't make it through the mix. So I'd be careful about how thin you go if you go that route.
I heard that Brad Wilk (RATM), was playing the new sabbath stuff with them.

On-topic, it is weird how thinner b20 can last longer than the heavier stuff, but they really do build earthquake-resistant buildings on the same premise. The more flexible, the more it can stand before the break-point.

Also be careful how you treat them and store them when not on the kit. Dropping a pie on the edge once has been the slow death of many cymbals. The cracks are tiny at first and get bigger with play. don't store them on edge, also if the bottom surface is hard like a concrete floor.
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
I generally don't tighten down my wing nuts a ton, just enough to keep the ride from moving around, but yes, I dented the bells with just a drumstick. Like I said previously, I was using big, heavy sticks and hitting hard. Not that I was trying to hit as hard as I could, but after playing for years I've developed a very relaxed and efficient technique and I can hit a lot harder than I even realise at times, thus the need for the change in sticks.
 

StaggerLee

Silver Member
My usual immediate response is "technique" but i somehow doubt that is the issue here. Im someone else who hasnt broken a cymbal so not quite sure what to say with it. I will say that i find the thinner the cymbal the rarer i see it crack (as weird as this sounds). Partly due to how well it absorbs the impact i guess, so best bet maybe try some of those?
 

Road Bull

Silver Member
I am trying to be more critical of my own practices. For instance, I think you can be utilizing proper technique, but also be using too much force.

I always play with hearing protection, (foam plugs). I also play in a loud band. I think that it becomes easy to loose perspective on just how hard you are hitting when you have dulled the high end frequency out a bit.

I have been taking my shooting muffs off at home for a few minutes here and there after I have been playing for a bit. Granted, I am playing in a smaller wood floored room without having to compete with amps, but I am surprised at just how much volume I am producing. So it might come down to perceived dynamics.

I plan to do a bit of recording over the next few practices. I will vary, and back off how hard I am playing to try to get a better idea of my "sweet spot" for volume produced vs. Intensity played.
 
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Ghostnote

Guest
There is definitely a point where hitting any harder doesn't change the volume, it only changes the sound of your cymbals, so try to keep that in mind. Of course, it's hard to do that sometimes when the adrenaline is flowing and you're in the heat of the moment. Sound and volume-wise, aything past a solid, grazing blow to your cymbals is pointless. Same with drums- anything past a good, solid rim shot is just wasted energy and needless stress on the body.
 

Fresh

Senior Member
Alphas are quite durable but the sound is definitely a step down from the 2002s. I'd probably suggest (funds allowing), you keep your 2002s for gigs and recording and switching over to a set of alphas for practice purposes.
 

Pylot

Senior Member
I am a bit of a noob here and just recently back into drumming. So forgive my impertinence.

But I have to ask, what are you doing cracking a ride? Especially one that big.

Sorry but it just seems completely wrong. You saying that when it was well excited as you made it shimmer it cracked or you whacked it and broke it?
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I use slick nuts on my cymbal stands and it is almost impossible to put them on too tight. They just slip on.
 

Stroman

Platinum Member
I am a bit of a noob here and just recently back into drumming. So forgive my impertinence.

But I have to ask, what are you doing cracking a ride? Especially one that big.

Sorry but it just seems completely wrong. You saying that when it was well excited as you made it shimmer it cracked or you whacked it and broke it?
Certain types of music call for crashing on the ride, or crash-riding. It's certainly possible to crack a ride.

If all you ever do is play spang spang-a-lang with the tip of the stick on the bow of the cymbal (an oversimplification), you aren't likely to break one. Dig in with the shoulder of the stick, though, and it can happen.
 
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