Newer Trixon Snare Drums

while trying to research what vintage Trixon kits are worth I stumbled upon these newer snares from them. there was an older thread on here which states they're knockoffs (that thread is locked), but according to the Trixon USA website the guy making them now gained control of the company in 2000 and began producing drums in 2007.

all the snares are reasonably priced and look good. shame there's no videos. these ones caught my eye specifically:



has anyone seen or heard these before?
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I wish I had some first hand experience to share but I've never pulled the trigger on one. The hammered copper snare really appeals to me but every time I've been close to getting one I've decided on something else.

I suppose to some degree I'm put off by the overly jargon-heavy ad copy on these and it makes me wary it's covering up shortcomings in the drums, but they seem to be decent drums if the pics match what you get.
 
I wish I had some first hand experience to share but I've never pulled the trigger on one. The hammered copper snare really appeals to me but every time I've been close to getting one I've decided on something else.

I suppose to some degree I'm put off by the overly jargon-heavy ad copy on these and it makes me wary it's covering up shortcomings in the drums, but they seem to be decent drums if the pics match what you get.
yeah, that's a good point. I'm not in the market for another snare drum, but they're pretty intriguing. I just wonder how a company like that even sells drums? I never saw those marketed. there's no video demos or anything.
 
I bought one of the birch 5.5x14 snares with the wood hoops. It is built really well, plus it looks and sounds great. Quality construction, smooth and solid edges, great hardware. The only shortcoming I saw was the Remo UT head that is came with.
oh yeah! I remember seeing that snare in one of your pictures on the Crush drums post. I saw it on their website too. looks like a solid snare for under $200.

I reached out to the owner to see if he has any demo videos of those copper snares. interested in what they sound like.
 

single-ply

Senior Member
I know they are also making concert percussion instruments like marimbas, etc. The consensus from those types of players is that Trixon quality is the bottom of the barrel, hence the low prices. I'm talking about their concert stuff, but I would assume the philosophy carries over to their snares and drum sets.
 

markdrum

Silver Member
I made the mistake of buying one of the copper ones a few years back and it was so bad I couldn't even bring myself to sell it. I didn't want to do that to someone. When it came it was immediately obvious that they had hammered the shell and THEN crimped the bearing edges! The bearing edge looked like a moonscape. I sent it back and they sent me another one with a Gibraltar knock-off strainer. It failed after about a month. I can't speak for any of the other drums but the copper one from Jim Laabs music is pure garbage.
 
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Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I made the mistake of buying one of the copper ones a few years back and it was so bad I could even bring myself to sell it. I didn't want to do that to someone. When it came it was immediately obvious that they had hammered the shell and THEN crimped the bearing edges! The bearing edge looked like a moonscape. I sent it back and they sent me another one with a Gibralter knock-off strainer. It failed after about a month. I can't speak for any of the other drums but the copper one from Jim Laabs music is pure garbage.
😳

Note to self: do NOT ever buy a Trixon drum.
 
I made the mistake of buying one of the copper ones a few years back and it was so bad I could even bring myself to sell it. I didn't want to do that to someone. When it came it was immediately obvious that they had hammered the shell and THEN crimped the bearing edges! The bearing edge looked like a moonscape. I sent it back and they sent me another one with a Gibralter knock-off strainer. It failed after about a month. I can't speak for any of the other drums but the copper one from Jim Laabs music is pure garbage.
I don't think I would have sprung for one anyway, but now I definitely won't. what did you end up doing with it?
 

markdrum

Silver Member
I don't think I would have sprung for one anyway, but now I definitely won't. what did you end up doing with it?
The top bearing edge on the replacement snare wasn't too bad so I use the drum as a copper timbale. I took off the junk snare strainer and made a microphone mount to match the hole spacing.
 
The top bearing edge on the replacement snare wasn't too bad so I use the drum as a copper timbale. I took off the junk snare strainer and made a microphone mount to match the hole spacing.
nice you were able to salvage some of it at least. I actually messaged them on Reverb, when I first posted this, asking if they have any sound files/video demos. they never replied...
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
I bought a Trixon popcorn snare last year. You can find a horrible pic on their website--I bought the black sparkle. Sounds great. LOUD for an 8x5.5. Made very well.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
Since Premier went in and out of business several times, sold their iconic plant in Leicester, and are now a company selling kits, albeit of excellent quality, built by "other companies" in the Far East with a Premier badge affixed to their shells, I have a healthy suspicion of "brands". A real Trixon, a Trixon that makes drummers who know a little bit about these things get excited, was built somewhere between the late 50's and early 70's and may well have had a funky ovalised bass drum. Reading the company history on their own website I see a disconnect between 1974 and 2000 and there doesn't appear to be any continuity in location or tooling.
So any new Trixon snare drum to me would be judged on its' own merits although to be fair the Trixon logo on them still looks fabulous, very 60's, space age and Sputnik.
However having looked at the kits in the Trixon store and the fact that not one of them is set up in an attractive manner and many sport "Pearl-Style" tom arms, and then gone on to look at all of the other products they offer I'm left feeling that this is more an exercise in badge engineering of generic Far Eastern products. I've seen pretty much everything they sell elsewhere with different labels on. I'm not saying this means they're inherently bad but they're at a price point that the big companies also inhabit and that I'd feel far safer in making a purchase from.




Still love that Trixon badge though.
 
However having looked at the kits in the Trixon store and the fact that not one of them is set up in an attractive manner and many sport "Pearl-Style" tom arms, and then gone on to look at all of the other products they offer I'm left feeling that this is more an exercise in badge engineering of generic Far Eastern products. I've seen pretty much everything they sell elsewhere with different labels on. I'm not saying this means they're inherently bad but they're at a price point that the big companies also inhabit and that I'd feel far safer in making a purchase from.




Still love that Trixon badge though.
they have so many set options, it's kinda crazy. I wonder how they sell? I've never seen their stuff advertised anywhere either.

I think the badge is really cool too and love the look of that copper snare. a bit surprised they never responded to my Reverb message. probably not the best business practice to ignore potential customers.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
they have so many set options, it's kinda crazy. I wonder how they sell? I've never seen their stuff advertised anywhere either.

I think the badge is really cool too and love the look of that copper snare. a bit surprised they never responded to my Reverb message. probably not the best business practice to ignore potential customers.
Yes, so many different lines and no easy way to differentiate where each sits in terms of performance and price. Also no common visual ties such as shell hardware and tom mounts to give the lines a family identity.
 
Yes, so many different lines and no easy way to differentiate where each sits in terms of performance and price. Also no common visual ties such as shell hardware and tom mounts to give the lines a family identity.
their pictures are all pretty bad too.

these lugs are huge! they make DW's look small.
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