New Year/New Instructional DVD/Book Stanoch's Table of Time

denisri

Silver Member
I study and do one DVD per year. 2010 was Tommy Igoe's Great Hands for a Lifetime.Fro 2011 I'm considering doing David Stanoch's Mastering the Tables of Time. Does anyone have any comments and feedback regarding David's book. TX Denis
 

brady

Platinum Member
I study and do one DVD per year. 2010 was Tommy Igoe's Great Hands for a Lifetime.Fro 2011 I'm considering doing David Stanoch's Mastering the Tables of Time. Does anyone have any comments and feedback regarding David's book. TX Denis
You really do an entire DVD in a year? That's pretty impressive, especially if it's one like Great Hands for a Lifetime.

Did you take the routine all the way up to the advanced tempo? How long did it take?
 

denisri

Silver Member
Hi
Been playing for playing for 40 years. I have the advanced at 135 BPM...from here on out is just time and development. I'll use that for my warm up every day...and let the tempo development.
Been doing one book or one DVD for years. Then incorprate high points into my practice routine. this allows for casual development. Denis
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
I study and do one DVD per year. 2010 was Tommy Igoe's Great Hands for a Lifetime.Fro 2011 I'm considering doing David Stanoch's Mastering the Tables of Time. Does anyone have any comments and feedback regarding David's book. TX Denis
David's book is great. I think the real power in it is that it opens up a world of possibilities using a very simple, but very powerful method. For instance, take a simple idea, say 2 notes with an accent on the first note. Play it using single strokes, i.e. RLRL...

Now, learn to play that through every division/subdivision you can. Half notes, 1/4-notes, 1/4-note triplets, 1/8th notes, etc., etc. etc. Through this process, you're working on your technical ability AND your sense of time and rhythm - i.e. control of the Table of Time. How you apply those two notes is up to you. Any combination of sounds and/or limbs is available to you. There's tonnes of ideas for soloing, fills and grooves just on the first page if you simply set your mind to it.

There's an entire section on rudiments that works in the same way. Take a Single-Stroke 4/4-Stroke Ruff, for example, and apply that through all the various meters mentioned before. Mix and match sounds and limbs and instantly you've got a way of applying a simple rudiment in a myriad of ways. Once you can hear how the sticking works through various meters, it's really easy to call on it in various circumstances.

I like the book in that it is a little bit of a return to the style of books we used to see like Stick Control, and 4-Way Coordination (David studied with the latter's authors...) where the honus is on the user to develop and apply ideas generated by the material, rather than the ideas being laid out for you or restricted by genre. No matter what kind of music you're playing, you can find ways to apply the stuff to develop a number of important aspects of your playing: Time, Groove, Technique, Coordination, but ALL in the context of mastering rhythm and the relationships between rhythms. I have to admit this appeals to me as a student of another teacher (Jim Blackley) who takes a similar approach - i.e. all technique, coordination, etc. is learned in the context of simultaneously learning rhythm.

For the record, I have nothing against the context-based stuff that dominates the market today (I think Tommy Igoe's Groove Essentials is amazing, for instance). It's just that I think it's important that we also learn how to take a simple thing and use it through our own creativity and exploration, rather than have it written out in front of us by someone else (not that Tommy's book discourages that....) Enough disclaimers... ;) In fact, the first thing I do once I've gotten a handle on one of the ideas generated by Dave's material is apply it in context with tracks and recordings to see how I can make it work.

I know David lurks around here from time to time but isn't a member, and perhaps if you have any really serious questions about the book, you could post them here, or drop him a line by email. He's asked me to post stuff here on his behalf before, in fact. He's incredibly open about answering questions and trying to help people understand his stuff, which is another reason I really dig his whole thing. He's had the great fortune to work with and know a lot of really heavy cats (from Max to Purdie) and though he'd say he isn't a heavy cat himself, I think he's managed to absorb an amazing amount from those guys and that knowledge and understanding deeply informs his approach. He's also been guinea-pigging the stuff on unsuspecting college students for a long while, and has tweaked the stuff through a lot of trial and error.

Anyway, to sum up: I don't think you can go wrong purchasing this book and working through it diligently. I've benefited very much from the book as have some of my students who I've used the material with.
 
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jivadayadasa

Senior Member
Reading these comments and checking out clips on the VF website has convinced me to buy this too. Does it really come with a dvd or do you have to access the video segments online?

Seeing these concepts demonstrated has opened my eyes once again and shown me just how much of a beginner I am. But I guess it's "better late than never" to catch on to these fundamentals, right?

Denis, your one-a-year is inspiring me to try the same this new year. Thanks!

Jiva
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Reading these comments and checking out clips on the VF website has convinced me to buy this too. Does it really come with a dvd or do you have to access the video segments online?

Seeing these concepts demonstrated has opened my eyes once again and shown me just how much of a beginner I am. But I guess it's "better late than never" to catch on to these fundamentals, right?

Denis, your one-a-year is inspiring me to try the same this new year. Thanks!

Jiva
The online videos are a companion and there is no DVD with the book - or at least there wasn't when I got my copy.
 

jivadayadasa

Senior Member
The online videos are a companion and there is no DVD with the book - or at least there wasn't when I got my copy.
Gotcha. Thanks for the info. I think this might be suited to when I am back at lessons so an instructor can make sure I am playing these correctly. Not sure I can do this on my own.
 

denisri

Silver Member
Hi Guys
Tx's. Boomka,great info. I agree with your assessment.
Jiva,one book/DVD allows for a slow digestion of the material over time(a year)...Then,I keep what I want in my practice schedule, use some info on my students and more on...Once again! Tx's. Denis
 

brady

Platinum Member
Hi
Been playing for playing for 40 years. I have the advanced at 135 BPM...from here on out is just time and development. I'll use that for my warm up every day...and let the tempo development.
Been doing one book or one DVD for years. Then incorprate high points into my practice routine. this allows for casual development. Denis
That's actually a great idea. Stupid me. I've worked on some sections of the advanced, trying to work it up to tempo. It may be better to complete the whole thing at whatever tempo I can perform it.
Thanks.
 

BillBachman

Gold Member
Thanks for the review on David's book! I have a copy and it's on my list. I just need more time in the day to practice, I'm working through 2 right now and have multiple others on the waiting list.
 
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