New wood snare options

rmac86

Member
Hi all,

Haven’t had a proper wood snare for a while and have played a few that I liked. Basically I need one for mic’d shows and recording work, choices are:

Mapex MPX 14x7 maple
Pearl modern utility maple 14x8
Tama Soundworks 13x7 kapur
Tama S’works 14x6.5 maple

I prefer low tuning for a powerful, low thud sound so which would you guys go for? Heads are going to be Remo CS over Ambassador snare side and wires will be PS Blasters.

Thanks,

R
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Based on your statement, "I prefer low tuning for a powerful, low thud sound . . . ," the logical choice would seem to be the Pearl Modern Utility Maple 8X14. I'd totally agree with your choice of reso head and snares, but I suspect that you will need to do some trial and error on the batter head. I never thought I'd be saying this, but I'm wondering whether that "low thud" sound might be achieved with . . . yes . . . an Evans Hydraulic head. Earlier in the year I tapped around on a new set of some brand equipped with new Hydraulics and I was amazed at how much better they sounded than in the early years. You might give that a try. Or not.

GeeDeeEmm

 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
My inner smartass wants to say that "powerful" and "low thud" rarely happen together in real life, and if that's the sound you actually want, it probably doesn't really matter which drum you choose.

In my experience deep drums don't handle low tunings well. Deep drums tuned low just tend to sound sloppy and require a lot of extra muffling to trim out all the extra honk and rattle. I'd look to something 6.5" deep, maybe even 5". I'm not sure if I'd go full-on Hydraulic but I do think an Emperor or something with dry vents (and preferably two-ply) would be a better batter head choice.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
If the drum is mic'd, construction type aside, I'd go for the 13" x 7" every time. I know the smaller size is counter intuitive, but I find you can get a low tuning with much better control in a deeper 13" compared to a 14".

Example - (13" x 7" snare with kit clip) - no EQ / processing. Low tuning. One piece of moon gel.

 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Based on your statement, "I prefer low tuning for a powerful, low thud sound . . . ," the logical choice would seem to be the Pearl Modern Utility Maple 8X14. I'd totally agree with your choice of reso head and snares, but I suspect that you will need to do some trial and error on the batter head. I never thought I'd be saying this, but I'm wondering whether that "low thud" sound might be achieved with . . . yes . . . an Evans Hydraulic head. Earlier in the year I tapped around on a new set of some brand equipped with new Hydraulics and I was amazed at how much better they sounded than in the early years. You might give that a try. Or not.

GeeDeeEmm

Yes, you can definitely manipulate the sound a lot with a head like a hydraulic. On my build I did recently, I put a clear gray colortone Remo on the drum. It's a totally different monster than a coated head. FAT, deep. . .It's a 14X6 7/8" maple keller shell.
 

rmac86

Member
Based on your statement, "I prefer low tuning for a powerful, low thud sound . . . ," the logical choice would seem to be the Pearl Modern Utility Maple 8X14. I'd totally agree with your choice of reso head and snares, but I suspect that you will need to do some trial and error on the batter head. I never thought I'd be saying this, but I'm wondering whether that "low thud" sound might be achieved with . . . yes . . . an Evans Hydraulic head. Earlier in the year I tapped around on a new set of some brand equipped with new Hydraulics and I was amazed at how much better they sounded than in the early years. You might give that a try. Or not.

GeeDeeEmm

Interesting, I’ve been using the Remo CS on a WorldMax 14x6.5 black brass snare. Tuned low it is pretty ringy but this is tamed with 2-3 moongels.

Would it be worth trying the Pearl 14x8 with an Emperor or Emperor X? Haven’t had the best of luck with Evans heads in the past. They do seem to tune up quickly but lose this tuning faster than Remos. On the other hand most all Remo IMO take a while to seat properly but when they do they seem to hold their tuning consistently.

Though having said that I did hear a great (un-mic’d) shallow nondescript mapex stock wood snare. Drummer was using a 300 snare side with a coated Genera Dry and it sounded immense playing metal and heavy rock.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I recently got a 6x14 maple dw collectors. 10+6
I find it great for the purpose you list.
It's a bit drier than I expected it to be, but that's probably a good thing for what you're after.
I like keeping my snare depth range between 5-6.5" for anything that I consider to be a workhorse drum (a drum that will work in most musical situations in any room.) Too deep of a drum can get lost with the other musicians and to shallow of a drum can sound weak.

I usually do a Remo CS, but with this snare I went right back to the ambassador since it played so well tuned low to medium and was already quite dry sounding without many overtones. It lost a bit of its attack when it had the CS on it.
 

rmac86

Member
Hi all,

Just to update you guys I ended up getting the Pearl Modern Utility 14x8 in stunning red and black finish, pictures to follow!

I played it with the stock Remo UT batter and reso heads and the sound was ok, but then swapped these out for an ambassador hazy reso and Evans Genera Dry. The Evans was a weird choice for me as I was gonna go with standard Remo CS but guys here seem to suggest that wouldn’t be enough.

Question is I have a show to do this weekend that will be in-mic’d so am wondering will the Evans be enough in a smallish venue when it’s tuned low and thuddy? I have a Genera dry HD as well- would that be a better option, or maybe a Remo PS3?

Thanks,

R
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I'd try both of the Dry options. In the end you'll probably get a little more attack with the 1-ply, and a little more overtone control with the HD.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
Deep wooden snares tuned low sound like bad toms that have a sympathetic buzz.

My inner smartass wants to say that "powerful" and "low thud" rarely happen together in real life, and if that's the sound you actually want, it probably doesn't really matter which drum you choose.

In my experience deep drums don't handle low tunings well. Deep drums tuned low just tend to sound sloppy and require a lot of extra muffling to trim out all the extra honk and rattle. I'd look to something 6.5" deep, maybe even 5". I'm not sure if I'd go full-on Hydraulic but I do think an Emperor or something with dry vents (and preferably two-ply) would be a better batter head choice.
 
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