New to the Drum World

Hi Everyone,

The band doesn't matter that much, well it'd be cool, but I'm 18. I have a starter's kit. Pulse. Two Toms, Bass, Floor Tom, and Snare, and the standard 3 pc cymbal set that came with it, it sounds real good for costing only $600. But I really want to get better. And so far it's been really frustrating not being able to do what I want to do with drums. Any tips to getting better, efficiently. If I can get really good at drums in the next 3-6 years, it would probably be my career. Otherwise, I work my way up in my dad's company. But I love drums and I love drumming.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
1. This is not a career any more.
2. This will never be a career again, probably.
3. do this for personal growth, socializing with others, and the sheer love of music and drumming

Once we are 100% clear on those, the rest is easier. In my humble opinion
 
Try different teachers and get the best one you can find. A good teacher knows what matters and how to get there. Becoming good enough to make it a career or at least being very good in 3 years is very ambitious. Not saying that it can't be done, but I say just get a teacher and practice and play with others as much as possible. "Worst case scenario": You'll choose a different profession but you'll be able to make music with other people.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
If you want to grow rapidly as a drummer and be able to communicate the ideas in your head through your hands and feet to your kit you need a teacher. A good teacher will help you with technique. A good teacher will also teach you rudiments. Rudiments are pattern based exercises that help you develop independence between your limbs. You can study these on your own, but if your technique is bad you won't progress at the rate you would like, and can possibly injure yourself. Learning to read is a good skill to have also, but not necessary if you want to be in an original band. If you want to be a teacher, part of an orchestra, a studio musician, a backing musician, a cruise ship drummer, etc. then learning to read is a must. It's a good skill to have anyhow.

You can have a career in drumming. It's not what you think though. The days of making millions and touring the world are over for the most part. If you want to make money as a drummer you seriously need to consider one of the reading options above. Or just keep it as a hobby and be a weekend warrior with a real job as most people do.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
When I worked at a medical college I was amazed how many physicians were musically inclined- I think one of Dixie Dregs attended there. My point lots of people love music but also seek another profession-which doesn’t have to be medicine. Athletes often do same. But it’s great to take up a musical instrument for life long enjoyment and nothing wrong with having ambition to be a musician or athlete but be smart in weighing your options.
 

Jml

Senior Member
Nothing wrong with loving music, studying music and playing music. Making it a career is a different animal. I would say the vast majority of people on this site play drums for fun or, at most, some pocket change in weekly gigs. I’m totally happy making a living with my day job, and then playing drums when I want with my band for some cash.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Drop any time limits while you're at it. It's in your best interest to think of learning this instrument as a lifetime endeavor.

But hey, if you can do it in 3 to 6 years, more power to you. It's for sure against the odds these days.
 
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No Way Jose

Silver Member
Pulse kits are good. Get some good cymbals and you'll be fine. Play along with your favorite recordings. You don't have to play fancy to gig. Basic grooves are often good enough for gigging. Save and invest your money and possibly one day you won't need a job, you can play drums instead.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
Hi Everyone,

The band doesn't matter that much, well it'd be cool, but I'm 18. I have a starter's kit. Pulse. Two Toms, Bass, Floor Tom, and Snare, and the standard 3 pc cymbal set that came with it, it sounds real good for costing only $600. But I really want to get better. And so far it's been really frustrating not being able to do what I want to do with drums. Any tips to getting better, efficiently. If I can get really good at drums in the next 3-6 years, it would probably be my career. Otherwise, I work my way up in my dad's company. But I love drums and I love drumming.
Only take advice from people who are making a career out of drumming and music if you want to have a career in drumming and music.
That means you pretty much ignore 99% of what's said here. Don't listen to others who tell you your dreams aren't achievable.
Best of luck to you.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I just read a post on another forum where the person had the opportunity to hang out with Chad Wackerman after a gig and asked him what's the best way to get better. He wrote, and I quote, "He looked at me and said "practice"." That's the only way to get better. If you are new to the drum world that means you haven't been playing very long. Were you expecting to be Vinnie Colaiuta right away? And it's not just practicing. It's the right kind of practicing. Rudiments are essential. Lessons are also essential. You have it a lot easier than many people. First of all, $600 is a decent amount of money for a first drum set. Second, you don't have to worry how your rent will get paid and how you will get your next meal. The option of working for your father is something you should not take for granted. Clearly the money is there to be able to take lessons. Find a good teacher and take in as much as you can, practicing as much as you can and listening to as much music as you can. Eventually you'll get better. @danondrums is right in that negativity is unhealthy. But if you really want to make music your career, it pretty much takes hours and hours of practice, much of it alone. It's not going to come easily. You have to work at it. Only you know if you want it bad enough.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
Practice alone isn't going to do it nor are messages on an internet forum so I'll only leave the following advice.
Get with a pro teacher. They are all so accessible now and you can connect with amazing players on skype from all over the world.
Get with cover bands as soon as possible. Don't bother with original music. Those who do the original music path are depending a lot more on luck than skill and they are spending less time playing songs and feeling music than those who play covers. Take the time to learn the covers note for note (or as close as you can get) and learn discipline nice and early.
Start studying and playing jazz immediately.

I'm not a pro, but have lots of contact with pros regularly who are helping me develop my own skills. The above is what I've taken from their tutelage regarding approaching the craft to achieve as much as you possibly can.

Again. Good luck and anyone who says your dream is impossible should be dismissed immediately from your life. And if anyone gives advice without their resume, or you don't know their skill level, don't take it seriously at all.
 

force3005

Silver Member
Hi Lawrence11 and welcome to DW. IMO find a instructor that you can relate to and they can show you what you want. Stay working at you father's company. You will have a cash flow coming in then practice two or more hours a night, start going to auditions and open jam nights. As others have said meet talk with local musicians. Bottom line is have fun with this.
 
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Frank

Gold Member
Believe in any dreams you have. It is Entirely up to - You.

But 4 elements are non negotiable, and the extent of these depend on just how far you want to go:

1. Getting to work - practicing a great deal - over a significant period of time.

2. Studying with a pro teacher.

3. Tons of listening to past greats.

4. Force yourself into as many collaborative/live/band playing situations as you can.
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
You can still make money playing the drums, just not like you used to.

At least in my town, musicals still pay decently. I'm just starting to get into it but I get about $80 a night on average. You can't sustain yourself on that, so you will need a day job, but they're fun, steady for the 2+ weeks the musical runs, and gets you some nice extra cash.

If you hate musicals or think you're too good for them, then sorry. There's no money anymore :p
 
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