New drummer with no musical talent what so ever.

beatdat

Senior Member
So the question is, what’s the hardest thing to master on drums?

1. Buzz roll

2. Fast linear drumming

3. Deep pocket/groove/feel

4. Something else?
Well, I don't think any of that is easy at all, and none of it is something a beginning drummer will be able to do right away unless they were blessed with an innate gift.

But, I think one of the hardest things to master on the drums is developing consistency in being able to control the sticks and pedals so that you are in full control of whatever you play each and every time.

In essence, I find the difference between being "good" and "great" lies in another saying, that "amateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until they can't get it wrong."

I'm still dumbfounded in how I can be pleased with my playing one day and the next day feel like I'm picking up the sticks for the first time.
 
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johnwesley

Silver Member
BEATDAT.....is dead on in everything he's posted. Lot's of wanna be guitarists who find out how difficult is is to master fingerings and picking resort to drums thinking it's just a matter of hitting them. WRONG. Way more than that. Four limbs keeping in step with each other while all doing separate things. Almost like you need 4 brains.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Controlling your volume, playing consistently, and being able to play well on any drum kit just sitting in are all barriers one learns to master. I think there is a general misunderstanding that you "beat" drums. Now sure you can but really it's what, where, how you stroke/finesse musicality out of an instrument that isn't "noted/pitched" with a musical scale like piano, marimba, guitar, etc.
 

campy

Junior Member
BEATDAT.....is dead on in everything he's posted. Lot's of wanna be guitarists who find out how difficult is is to master fingerings and picking resort to drums thinking it's just a matter of hitting them. WRONG. Way more than that. Four limbs keeping in step with each other while all doing separate things. Almost like you need 4 brains.
I am learning that now trying to hit the snare on beat 2 and the base pedal on 3 and snare on 4 and keep it going without screwing up and try to get faster at it.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
I am learning that now trying to hit the snare on beat 2 and the base pedal on 3 and snare on 4 and keep it going without screwing up and try to get faster at it.
Don't worry about the speed. That'll come soon enough. Keep concentrating on keeping everything nice and even. Take it slow and once you're comfortable pick up the pace. Read what GetAgrippa said above. Drumming is more than just hitting the drums. There are a lot of dynamics involved. Probably one of the hardest is learning how to play quietly since drums are inherently loud. Let us know how you're progressing. Have fun.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
So the question is, what’s the hardest thing to master on drums?

1. Buzz roll

2. Fast linear drumming

3. Deep pocket/groove/feel

4. Something else?
Hardest thing to master on drums is also the only thing that really matters at the end of the night. Being a musician.

People get caught up in the techniques, grooves, speeds and fancy footwork and sometimes forget that you're there to make music. It's not really about the drums. If more people would think bigger then all that other stuff comes along for the ride anyway... In the order that you actually need it.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Good to see you back, campy. Even better that you got your kit and started playing it.

You've been given some solid advice so far, and I hope you take the time to read through the thread again, ask any questions you may have, and benefit from what's been said.

If you're serious about learning how to drum, do take some lessons. Without any, chances are you'll either hinder your ability to develop in short order or injure yourself in due time. There is a wrong way to play the drums that is not only unmusical, but of little help in developing your playing. Unfortunately, bad drumming habits are easy to develop, and sometimes harder to break. A good teacher will make sure you don't develop them from the start. As Odd-Arne said, there is no substitute for lessons. And please, please, as johnweasly said, do not worry about speed. Focusing on speed off the bat is a great way to quickly develop those habits. Like he said, take it (actually, take everything you learn) slow, and concentrate on "keeping everything nice and even". Speed will come, it's a natural by-product of proper control.

If you can't take lessons, I recommend you get Tommy Igoe's Great Hands for a Lifetime and spend a few months studying and working through the first chapter "Basics" alone. I also recommend you get George Marsh's Inner Drumming - it's more of a conceptual approach to playing the drums, but having made some assumptions based on what you've posted, I think it may be well suited for you. Of course, do get some more formal learning material on how to play the kit. You could do worse than the books in the Alfred's drumset method series, so perhaps start with those. Also, always practice to a click or music with a solid rhythm section.

You're going to get more good advice, so don't hesitate to ask questions - they're bound to arise, and the folks on here are here to answer them. And I think we're all in agreement that, above all, have fun. Truly. Drums are a blast to play, and even more of a blast once you start to really get it. Just take your time and do it the right way. I assure you, you'll get better faster that way.

And don't worry about speed.



People get caught up in the techniques, grooves, speeds and fancy footwork and sometimes forget that you're there to make music.
Something my last teacher tried to teach me during my first lesson. Took a lot longer than it should have for me to learn it.
 
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