New drummer with no musical talent what so ever.

campy

Junior Member
I'm going to be 69 next month and tried learning guitar but my fingers and hand are small and not as flexible as they use to be, so my kids wanted to know what I wanted for Christmas so I told them the Alesis Nito Mesh kit. Now what do I do?
 

crash

Member
You need a good set of headphones, to start, probably with a 1/4 plug to fit into the Alesis brain. You will need a kick peddle and a stool to sit on. You can check out how to set it up online to see how people set it up. And a pair of sticks. Smaller and lighter works well on the pads. I use a 7A size.
Dialing in the pads can be a bit tricky, as you have to set them by ear. Maybe get advice from someone who has a similar kit. Good Luck! Have Fun!
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I recommend getting a practice pad as well. Start out with very slow alternating single strokes, with really big motions. Try to get your left and right hand strokes to sound the same.
 

Advinghelli

Member
With about a year under my belt I'm nothing to write home about either. I use songsterr and youtube to learn and progress. YouTube has "drumless tracks". They help me calibrate my rhythm, expand genres, and most importantly are fun. Then again, I'm no expert by any means.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Do your kids play instruments? Just being able to jam with your kids or grandkids is precious, even if you are just beginning on drums.
Yes, how fun?! That would be great. I'll add finding a local teacher to maybe give you some groundwork. The vids are awesome too as GruntersDad mentioned.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
I don't think you have to worry about setting up the Alesis kit. It comes out of the box ready to play. Just scroll through the kit sounds and find one you like. As pointed out, you'll need a bass drum pedal (anything inexpensive by any of the major players: Yamaha; Tama; DW; PDP; Gibraltar), a seat (throne), and a set of 5AN nylon-tipped sticks (ProMark; Vic Firth; Regal; Zildjian; etc.).

Once you are making noise, go to YouTube and find videos for beginning drummers.

Finally, have the fun of your life.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Pretty much anyone can find enjoyment in playing.

Talent is really just a different word for interest and ability to focus.

Get some lessons. There is no real substitute.

If you're serious about technique you want a pad as well. It's just handy, quiet and mobile

Going through a basic method of reading is good. If you already know how to read, it will be very helpsful

In addition, just learn the most basic versions of grooves you want to play, focus on listening and structures of songs and just go for it. There's no reason to go super complex. You need to play, play music, and then just slowly add elements as desired or comfortable.
 

rustyfingers

Senior Member
1. Take a couple of lesson on how to hold the sticks and some beginning exercises. Two or three should get you started and will make such a huge difference in the long run. I'm 60 and I spent my first few drumming years using/learning traditional grip (don't do that) and wasted a lot of time that I really didn't have. Went back to match and worked with a teaching friend and have made tremendous strides over the last couple of months.

2. Stretch before you practice. This is especially important for us older players and helps loosen you up and that's the key to everything. Loose... Loose... Relax...
 

campy

Junior Member
I bought one of the electronic practice set ups a while back just to play around with. My nearly 3 year old grand daughter loves to play with it and also my guitar. I will have many hours of enjoyment with her and a full set of drums. I also bought her a cheap Ukelele to play with and we both can learn to play it together and I don't have to worry about her snapping metal strings.
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
Do you love playing drums? I'll never forget the words of Joseph Shabalala who formed the African musical group Ladysmith Black Mambazo who appeared with Paul Simon on the Graceland album. "To be a member of this group you don't need to know how to sing. You just need to love to sing."
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
1. Take a couple of lesson on how to hold the sticks and some beginning exercises. Two or three should get you started and will make such a huge difference in the long run. I'm 60 and I spent my first few drumming years using/learning traditional grip (don't do that) and wasted a lot of time that I really didn't have. Went back to match and worked with a teaching friend and have made tremendous strides over the last couple of months.
YES. This is good advice. After a few lessons and some playing along with music, if you find that you don't enjoy playing the drums, sell the drums ASAP and buy something you will enjoy. Why do I say this? Because now you are under the gun. Your kids will expect you to play for them. The key is, make sure you enjoy playing.

.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well depends on what you want to get out of it-like anything what you get out depends on what you put in. If for fun well I'd just wing it and have fun-watch some videos and play along to music you enjoy. If higher expectations then come up with a plan-a strategy to achieve your goals in an efficient and timely manner, which would involve a teacher. You can go to Vic Firth site for all the 40 rudiments-which I'd focus on single, double, triple stroke rolls, paradiddle variations and go from there with others. Most beginners state they got it in their head just they can't do it with their hands-that's because you haven't connected them-which rudiments really helps to plug the two together in agility and dexterity (you'll see it playing anything after the rudiment practice).
 

jansara

Junior Member
I'm going to be 69 next month and tried learning guitar but my fingers and hand are small and not as flexible as they use to be, so my kids wanted to know what I wanted for Christmas so I told them the Alesis Nito Mesh kit. Now what do I do?
You "have no musical talent whatsoever" and you want to play drums.

From what I've seen, that hasn't stopped thousands of hackers from debasing the instrument.

Go for it. You'll be in good company.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
Do you love playing drums? I'll never forget the words of Joseph Shabalala who formed the African musical group Ladysmith Black Mambazo who appeared with Paul Simon on the Graceland album. "To be a member of this group you don't need to know how to sing. You just need to love to sing."
I like that, it reminds me of the old African proverb that says, "if you can walk you can dance, if you can talk you can sing."

So, to the OP I would say, don't worry about having little talent now, because if you can clap, you can play drums.

Just keep it mind that, while drums may be the easiest instrument to hack away on, it's the hardest one to master.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I like that, it reminds me of the old African proverb that says, "if you can walk you can dance, if you can talk you can sing."

So, to the OP I would say, don't worry about having little talent now, because if you can clap, you can play drums.

Just keep it mind that, while drums may be the easiest instrument to hack away on, it's the hardest one to master.
So the question is, what’s the hardest thing to master on drums?

1. Buzz roll

2. Fast linear drumming

3. Deep pocket/groove/feel

4. Something else?
 
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