Neil Peart

Edgecrusher

Junior Member
I am very ignorant about Neil Peart. I have only heard the Rush song and his solo which are on this site and I quite liked what I heard, but I wasn't blown away. It said on his bio that he is "the most popular drummer today", but I'm not sure why after what I heard. I can understand why people love Steve Gadd, but to me Neil Peart isn't that great judging from what I've heard so far. Why is he so popular?

In his solo, he didn't do any beats which I found very interesting or which really grooved and had a good feel to them (IMO), at least not compared to Gadd, or Vinnie. He kept the bass on 1 and 3 for the most part (I think). Does he ever do linear beats?

If the samples on this site are good examples of his style, then I guess I don't like his style, but that's not to say it's "bad"... just my humble opinion.
 

Zardoz

Member
I think we should change the name of the website to "EveryPostMustContainASteveGaddReference.com" ;-)

Just like another member mentioned on here, Peart and my father are my 2 main influences for picking up drumsticks. As far as rock drummers go, he is the greatest ever and arguably behind Rich and Krupa.....one the most influential drummers ever. Also, there are very few drummers that you can listen to for a few seconds and go "yeah that's so-and-so playing", Peart is one of them.

Edgecrusher (cool FF song btw), he's been in a little band called Rush for about 30 years now. If your only exposure to him is from this website, then I will first be more than happy explaining to you what a snare drum is ***i'm kidding!*** and then make you some Rush compilations. ;-) ;-) ;-)

Those few small clips of a legend like Peart on here are just like most clips on here.....not the best way to totally soak in the artist and his/her style. I think of them as "teaser trailers".

His solo differs from about 90% of other big-named drummers in that, he's not just hamming it up and showing off his chops. It's an actual composition, which is different then the token "wow that dude is da fastest!" drum solo types. The man can sit down and explain the reason for every note he plays, which makes it more interesting.

The complaint that I hear most about Peart's playing is that he "overplays everything", but many other big-name drummers (which I won't name because I'm not turning this into a war), play over-the-top for the music they're propelling or following, but with Rush his style fits perfectly. This guy rarely plays a bad beat. When people say "they don't groove" are missing the point of their music. Rush's music is pure energy and that's it.

And whatever ignorant person said the guy must have an ego. While I'm sure he does just like most musicians (why does that need to be expained???) there are many interviews where he shuns off any pioneering things people have pointed out him doing and also telling people to "if you want to really listen to guys who play, listen to Bruford, Bozzio," and lists a few others.....so, if you call that "ego", then you're probably just some disgruntled drummer who throws a temper tantrum because you still can't play 'Tom Sawyer' after all these years of practicing in your mum's basement. ;-)

In closing, I would highly suggest picking up his dvd's, even if you don't like the Rush-sound or whatever, because the man's philosophy about music will blow your mind. He has some of the best speaking parts in any "instructional" videos I've ever seen. The dude knows his sh*t moreso than most professional musicians.
 

Zumba_Zumba

Senior Member
I know. I just came to after passing out reading that post. Seriously in all fairness to edgecrusher, this website has opened me up to new drummers I might have heard about but never heard play or seen play. Some of them I was disappointed and others I was blown away. That's the beauty of drumming and music for that matter. Discovery is always going to occur. Believe it or not, there are people out there that don't find Steve Gadd to be all that great (very small minority but still).

Anyway, edgecrusher, check him out. I hear Rush is releasing the Exit...Stage Left DVD soon and that contains arguably some of Neil's best work.

And another note for everyone: Nutha Jason mentioned in a nutha thread that copying a drum part and composing a drum part are very different. So remember, people may be able to "copy" his stuff and then turn around and say he's not all that great, but I bet they couldn't come up with those beats.
 
F

foghorn2

Guest
King Crimson said:
Just when you think you've heard it all........wow.
I'm beginning to think that some us drummers are a bit too critical.
When any of us has reached the level of success and the abilities of Neil Peart, then we shall be able to come here and criticize him. If you want to say you don't like his style thats one thing, but if you start to say that he sucks or anything like that, you'll have to deal with me after I hear what YOU have posted in the "your place, your playing" section on this board.
 

Bernhard

Founder Drummerworld
Staff member
Fact is, that the Neil Peart Page is the most visited gallery-page at Drummerworld every month for six years now.

Followed by the always changing Travis Barker and Joey Jordison.

Then come the heavy-weight champions Buddy Rich, Steve Gadd, Dennis Chambers.

Bernhard
 

tambian89

Senior Member
Bernhard said:
Fact is, that the Neil Peart Page is the most visited gallery-page at Drummerworld every month for six years now.

Followed by the always changing Travis Barker and Joey Jordison.

Then come the heavy-weight champions Buddy Rich, Steve Gadd, Dennis Chambers.

Bernhard
Personally, I think Neil Peart is the most influencial Rock drummer next to Bonham and Bill Ward (Sabbath). He is really one of the best, and many people identify with him, and strive to drum like him (like me).

- Marc
 

Zardoz

Member
It's kind of funny how things work out. Their music was better in the 70's, but some of his fantasy/sci-fi lyrical content wasn't the greatest. Then, they tone-down their music in the 80's, yet his lyrics were superior.

I get a kick out of whoever made that comment about Peart being an awful lyricist overall. Every lyricist from Dylan to Johnny Cash to Neil Young have had their run of poor lyrics. It's like once someone writes one poor song lyrically, their outcasts for it and can never recover from that. Give me a break.......
 

photon

Senior Member
Neil was a huge influence on me in the late 70's when I was a major Rush fan. As I matured I lost interest in the band as I found their music to be somewhat pretentious. To put it in perspective the last album of theirs I purchased and loved was Farewell to Kings. I saw them about 5 times in the late 70's and Neil was of course amazing.

That being said I recently purchased Anatomy of a Drum Solo and you know what?....the solo really didn't blow me away. I mean Neil still has those blinding chops but I found it to be too robotic and save for the electronic additions to his kit it could have been 1979 all over again...personally I don't see a lot of growth here.

I know I'm going to get killed for this but that's my personal take on it.
 

Anduin

Pioneer Member
photon said:
Neil was a huge influence on me in the late 70's when I was a major Rush fan. As I matured I lost interest in the band as I found their music to be somewhat pretentious. To put it in perspective the last album of theirs I purchased and loved was Farewell to Kings. I saw them about 5 times in the late 70's and Neil was of course amazing.
Dude, are you my long-lost twin? Did you see all those New Years Eve shows at Maple Leaf Gardens like I did?
 
G

Guinness

Guest
Rush is an extremely polarizing band. I'm probably the biggest Rush fan in the world and realize that a lot of people hate them. For me it's the whole package, Geddy, Alex and Peart. I don't think that any three guys could ever compliment one another in such a way as to make the beautiful music that they do so well. Peart's lyrics hit a personal note with me like it does many others. Every time I listen to their music it's like coming home. Like a great piece of art can effect you profoundly, so is Rush to me.
 

photon

Senior Member
No Anduin....I saw all those shows in Winnipeg....one of the best was with Max Webster warming up...it was the All the Worlds a Stage Tour.............they just blew my head off because it was in a small theatre.....
 

Zardoz

Member
photon said:
I recently purchased Anatomy of a Drum Solo and you know what?....the solo really didn't blow me away. I mean Neil still has those blinding chops but I found it to be too robotic and save for the electronic additions to his kit it could have been 1979 all over again...personally I don't see a lot of growth here.
No, you're not going to get burned at the steak for your opinion. However, I got so sick to my stomach after reading your post that I threw-up my dinner (just kidding!).

Although he is one of my main influences, I was also getting bored listening to his last 2 solos, mainly because he uses elements I've heard since the All The World's A Stage live album. Then, my bud who's a guitarist made a very simple, yet obvious point "He can use some of those parts again & again over a 30 year period because they're that cool-sounding." That quickly made me rethink what I previously stated.

Peart's solos differ from many pro drummers in that, it's not all about chops, playing 1,000 m.p.h. or blatantly showing off. His are more of a composition than anything. I love that "big-band" ending he uses, you don't see too much of that anymore, especially in a rock setting.

On the other hand, I've heard quite a few .mp3's of him warming up on the kit before a show and.....wow.....totally different than his drum solo. A total sonic assault and blazingly fast, especially for a dude who's in his 50's.
 

photon

Senior Member
Hey Zardoz I agree...the big band thing was the best part.. you just gotta love that swing....threw in a little homage to Buddy there too...
 

timebandit

Silver Member
DogBreath said:
I've been a fan of opera my whole life. One of my favorites is The Marriage of Figaro (Le Nozze di Figaro). I’ve listened to it so many times over the years on tape that I know almost every note by heart. One year for my birthday, my girlfriend bought tickets for us to see The Marriage of Figaro at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion is Los Angeles. We were young, and not rich, and we were probably the only couple there who didn't drive up in a luxury car. The place was beautiful, and the seats were great. The lights dimmed, the music started, and I was transported.



The opening scene takes place in the bedroom that will be shared by Figaro and Sussana after their wedding. Figaro is on his knees measuring the space that will be occupied by the nuptial bed. He calls out the numbers "Cinque... dieci.... venti... trenta!" exactly as I had heard them hundreds of times before, and I felt a thrill seeing the expression on his face while the familiar words were called out.



On and on the evening went, all the words exactly as I knew they would be, but now living things; all of the notes perfectly played by the orchestra. When the curtain fell for the last time the crowd was on its feet. This classic piece of musical theater had been executed faultlessly by a group of talented artists who realized that perfection is sometimes best expressed through perfect reproduction.



When I saw Rush in concert many years ago, the songs were performed with amazing precision. I was astounded at how closely the music matched the memories I had of all of times I had listened to the albums and heard the singles on the radio. Many bands riff and vamp. Many bands actually suck live and only achieve greatness through digital manipulation and post-production editing. Lightening, it is said, cannot strike the same place twice. Rush can strike home, with laser-like accuracy, over and over. Not all art is made better through riffing and improv. Some art is perfect just the way it is. I am thankful that Neil Peart has the ability to play my thoughts and memories just the way they are in my mind and heart.
I could not of said it better myself, that was beautiful! As for Stu you can't say you are, or were a true RUSH fan @ any time. A true RUSH fan changed as the years and music, changed and matured.Neil Peart could do 2&4 for the rest of his life, and he will always get the upmost respect from me !!!!! Sure there are other great drummers, more complex, faster, more indepent. I.E, Marco minnemann, Akira Jimbo, ect. But from Neil you get the whole package, take a listen to Hemisheres or NaturalScience, I say to you STU, name another drummer who could write, compose & play as well!!!
 

screaming muffin

Junior Member
i hate rush. And i hate neil pearts drumming. I'm not saying it's crap, i just hate it.

he has a weak drum sound, his fills are boring and repetitive, he doesn't groove, he uses electronics - which i hate because they sound cheesy and weak... he's technically great, or at least to me he is, but he isn't very creative. At least, not compared to Ringo, or Vinnie, or Tim Alexander (3 of my faves)

his double bass stuff is pretty boring, too

but i guess i'm biased because i hate rush and their over the top cheese flavoured sound... i prefer the cheese you can eat, not the stuff you can listen to, like rush.

I really hate that song The Trees, i hate the metaphor... they take themselves way too seriously, especially in that song (a song like that shouldn't be serious)

And Bravado is another one that rates highly on the suckiness scale to my ears

hahaha

and they have such a crap, CRAP name!! "Rush" ..?!??!?!!
not that it matters, but still

oh and btw... that's all IMO, so don't call me "wrong"

:D
 

DogBreath

Administrator Emeritus
screaming muffin said:
i hate rush. And i hate neil pearts drumming. I'm not saying it's crap, i just hate it.

he has a weak drum sound, his fills are boring and repetitive, he doesn't groove, he uses electronics - which i hate because they sound cheesy and weak... he's technically great, or at least to me he is, but he isn't very creative. At least, not compared to Ringo, or Vinnie, or Tim Alexander (3 of my faves)

his double bass stuff is pretty boring, too

but i guess i'm biased because i hate rush and their over the top cheese flavoured sound... i prefer the cheese you can eat, not the stuff you can listen to, like rush.

I really hate that song The Trees, i hate the metaphor... they take themselves way too seriously, especially in that song (a song like that shouldn't be serious)

And Bravado is another one that rates highly on the suckiness scale to my ears

hahaha

and they have such a crap, CRAP name!! "Rush" ..?!??!?!!
not that it matters, but still

oh and btw... that's all IMO, so don't call me "wrong"

:D
I wouldn't say that you're wrong, just somewhat limited in your ability to express your thoughts. It's a rare post in this forum that needs to use the word "hate" seven times while discussing a single subject. Oh, plus three uses each of "crap" and "cheese," and one reference to your "suckiness scale." Wow. You're really exposed me to a new way of looking at Neil Peart.
 
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ZDrums24

Senior Member
Bonham to the moon said:
thats why i dislike him, its like why would you want to go to a concert and listen to the SAME thing you would hear on the CD, i dunno, its kinda boring.
actually, lately hes been improvising a little more live, there are now whole sections of his solos where he take an idea and improvises over it.
 

cdawg_2010

Gold Member
i enjoy pearts playing, and hes one of my favorite rock drummers ever. but i also enjoy his big band video on here that from his dvd. i think he has great grooves and an even betetr set
 
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