Need Opinion on Equipment

Papa G

Junior Member
I'm 40 years old and have never been involved with any musical instruments....ever! I was the Jock you all probably hated in school. I'm not sure if I have an ounce of musical ability but I always have been curious about the drums and now have some time to dedicate to learning. Ran across this listing on CL but I have no idea if it's a decent set or if the price is right. Any feedback would greatly be appreciated.

http://fayar.craigslist.org/msd/5751325957.html
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
It depends on what shape they are in. It also depends on what kind of cymbals they are. Buying all of that hardware, pedals, cymbal stands etc. and drums and cymbals new, would cost you more than what they are asking. I say the price is fair. There are a lot of drums there!
It's a pawn shop. Try to get the price down. Offer $600 and see if they offer to lower the price. Walk away. Come back make another offer, etc.


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opentune

Platinum Member
If just starting I would not really recommend that set. Its not a super bad deal with all those cymbals and stands, but its almost too big and has too many components for distraction of a new drummer.
if you were to buy just set up the bass drum, snare, high hat cymbal, ride cymbal and maybe a couple toms and get going with some simple beats....for months.
Put the extra bass drum, extra toms and many cymbals in a closet until you have some basics down.
You could even just offer to buy half that set, it appears it is two Pearl sets put together.
 

Papa G

Junior Member
Thank Jim, Yeah I'm not in a rush at all but seen that set and was curious. That's just it I don't know what I'm looking at and I hate that feeling. Price wise yeah no doubt I would absolutely offer less.
 

Papa G

Junior Member
Called to find out what manufacture the symbols are and someone just put it on lay-a-way. Did not know lay-a-way was still around.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Yes I agree with opentune. You need less drums. Find a really small inexpensive set. I hope you enjoy playing the drums and stick with it.
But just in case you don't, you don't want to invest too much $$$.

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KamaK

Platinum Member
I'm not sure if I have an ounce of musical ability but I always have been curious about the drums and now have some time to dedicate to learning.
The line that I give almost everyone looking to get their first kit is:

Yamaha Stage Custom
Zildjian A box set (A391)
Yamaha 7 series hardware.

The biggest difference between buying new/used is the dent in your wallet. You're looking at about $1200 new and $750 used. You're also set for a fairly easy/quick resale should it not pan out for you.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Good price, but since you're asking.....

are you sure about the setup?

What sort of stuff do you want to play?

Is it just for some fun bashing or do you really want to learn?
 

bonerpizza

Silver Member
If you feel like you're going to stick with drums and want to make the purchase then you're more than welcome to do so but having that many drums when you're first starting out is 150% overkill, all you need at first is a bass drum, snare drum and some hi hats, you need to get the coordination and muscle memory down first before you can start putting toms and other cymbals into the mix.
That being said if you got that kit and you start gigging you could always use it as two separate kits and have one at home and to practice on and one that you gig with or however you want to work the bullshit out!
 

Papa G

Junior Member
I appreciate all the feedback guys. If i decide to take on a challenge I commit to it 100%. I actually want to learn how to play. As far as what type of music that is kind of complicated. I like classic rock, metal, and country so I would like to be able to play a little of everything down the road. I know that's a weird mix but I listen to about everything.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Wouldn't go as far as saying toms are not needed. Though you can do without if forced, many basic grooves require some tom work. I also use the whole kit creatively with young kids, especially if the school lacks choices in other percussion equipment. It's fun.

It stands though that you don't need that much stuff. When buying a package like that, you probably will develop different tastes than what it offers. Decent snare, hats, ride and crash is pretty much a drum kit. It's also important that the throne is a type that fits you and the pedals work well.

Nothing wrong with two bass drums per se, but it should be for a reason. They're a pain to carry around and unless the looks are really important to you, or you need the open Simon Phillips sound, most of us are quite happy with a modern double pedal.

I see nothing wrong with learning to move around the toms with your first basic fills. Moving around the kit and making melodic choices is part of the job. NO time like the present. Really, I see nothing wrong for a grown up starting with double bass either. Just keep the prioities straight. Keep things balanced and learn the basics really well including playing real music.
 
M

Matt Bo Eder

Guest
Beginner? I usually say "get whatever floats your boat", however, for those who know (and are willing to admit) they know absolutely nothing, I would suggest just four drums, a couple of cymbals and hi-hats to start.

Take a trip to a Guitar Center or Sam Ash, or whatever local music store you have near you to see their kit offerings. There are lots of deals on basic 4-piece kits with hardware and a cymbal pack, and of course, you will need a good throne to sit on, so budget $120 for that, since you're the heaviest part of the kit!

There's alot of music that can be played with a small kit, and it will allow you to focus on the drums' most important function which is to provide solid time for the band. Ringo played a small 4-piece with the Beatles, and Bonham played a big 4-piece with Zeppelin, with an extra floor tom. David Garibaldi actually used a small 4-piece with Tower of Power in their heyday, and Dave Grohl played a 4-piece with Nirvana. If you're into jazz, then lots of the masters played 4-piece kits too. So I would start there - it's about playing and making music, and not necessarily on how big your drumset is.
 

Wave Deckel

Gold Member
To be honest: I recommend to buy NO drums now. First go to a drumteacher, take some lessons, so you can try the instrument with a teacher by your side and see, if you can actually play the drums. Maybe you think you can do it but in reality don't have the musicality that it requires. Really, take a lesson first. If you feel uncomfortable, then you know, that it's not for you and you have not invested a buck in a drumset that you will need to sell again. If you (and the teacher) think, you could drum okay, THEN you should check the market for buying a used drumset.
 

picodon

Silver Member
The line that I give almost everyone looking to get their first kit is:

Yamaha Stage Custom
Zildjian A box set (A391)
Yamaha 7 series hardware.

The biggest difference between buying new/used is the dent in your wallet. You're looking at about $1200 new and $750 used. You're also set for a fairly easy/quick resale should it not pan out for you.
Good stuff. Buy something like that and learn on the fly. Don't waste time. I bought my SC at 40, 44 now and a decent (not in the least sophisticated) drummer. I'm loving it. You might get a cancer at 41. Do it now.
 

Papa G

Junior Member
To be honest: I recommend to buy NO drums now. First go to a drumteacher, take some lessons, so you can try the instrument with a teacher by your side and see, if you can actually play the drums. Maybe you think you can do it but in reality don't have the musicality that it requires. Really, take a lesson first. If you feel uncomfortable, then you know, that it's not for you and you have not invested a buck in a drumset that you will need to sell again. If you (and the teacher) think, you could drum okay, THEN you should check the market for buying a used drumset.
Wave I have thought about that idea as well. I live in Northeast Oklahoma in the middle of nowhere. Very little options with out driving over and hour each direction to get to a bigger city. I'm still exploring those options though.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Here's the best advice you will ever get about getting into drums at minimum cost while still buying good gear:

1) Drumset: Find a USED set of Pacific CX Maples. They were made of premium maple wood in a brand new DW factory in Mexico using the exact same machines and wood supplier as in the California DWs. You will hear no difference between the CX drums and the standard maple Collectors drums. The CX series sell very cheap. Most of the time the hardware is included in the sale. $250 - 450 depending on number of drums and condition.

2)Cymbals: Buy used on ebay the following cymbals: Zildjian A 20" medium ride. Don't worry how it looks. They clean up perfectly. Zildjian A 18" medium-thin or thin crash. Finally, one set of Zildjian A 14" hi hats. New Beat, Quick Beat, or Mastersound series are fine. Again, the best bargains in cymbals, and top professional quality. Ride: $100-125; crash: $60-70; hi hats: $125-150/pr.

3) The best darn drum throne you can afford. $150 for a med duty saddle and tripod; $300 for a throne you will cherish for a long, long, time.

Good luck. Write to me if you need specific questions answered.

GeeDeeEmm
 
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