Need help practicing?

Hi everyone, I’m a New drummer who’s just got a practice pad. I’m self taught for the minute but I’m not sure if I can find a good drum teacher in my area.

I’ve been setting myself goals and working on my techniques with a metronome. My Daily Practice would consist of warming up each hand then after that single stroke rolls with a metronome for about 10 minutes then I’ll move on to finger technique.

My question is as I’ve got no teacher I’m struggling in seeing if this is the right way to practice. I know everyone’s different in there own ways. I would say my goals are increasing speed and playing the songs I want to etc greenday, foo fighters and eventually joining a band. Obviously I’m really enjoying drumming I just want to keep progressing and completing my goals but I’m struggling where to start. Could anyone help me out on explaining how they practice and with a metronome aswell put in prospective cheers.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Do a DW search for metronome use, good drum books, and specific threads of your interest. There's a ton of info already gone over, but I'm sure plenty will give you guidance directly here-first most will say get a teacher.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
This becomes a very general and wide question.

If you want to be your own teacher and can handle it, make a list of goals and keep a log.

When learning songs, if some of it is beyond your understanding or capabilites, focus on learning and understanding the structure of the songs first.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
pas-drum-rudiments-2018dcccc96de1726e19ba7fff00008669d1.pdf

Copy the above link into your browser. It is a .pdf of 40 Percussive Arts Society Rudiments. I keep it on my phone for reference. I really don't know why, most of them are committed to memory at this point.

The ones with an asterisk (*) are the original 26 American Standard.

The stickings are shown on most. For the doubles, it shows you what hand the pattern starts and ends on. The number above the note tells you how many total strokes if you want to read the music notation. The 10 stroke roll is the odd duck. It's the 9, a rest (not notated, that's different), then the 10th stroke.

You can learn them in any order you want, but for me I find it makes more sense to learn singles, doubles, the flam, and the drag first. The rest are basically composed of these, and it makes them easier to understand and play correctly.

And here is a video of the standard 26, slowly first then at speed.


EDIT: the 6 stroke roll is similar to the 10, only its first note, rest, then the 5 stroke roll. So R (rest) LLRRL. I always forget something ☹
 
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beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
I made these a few years back but they are the most used rudiments in my playing. To be honest half of the "40 rudiments" are not going to be used in your day to day playing. It is still good to learn them for control, but get an A+ on a few rather than a D on all of them. Once you can nail one move on.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
Learn to count. 1-2-3-4. Play single strokes. Then learn to count eighth notes 1-an-2-an-3-an-4-an. When you feel bored try 3/4 time 1-2-3. It is a waltz. Try adding eighth notes 1-an-2-an-3-an.

You don't have to count everything, but it is a skill that I keep using. When I hear a drummer do something on a recording, if I want to learn it, I count out the rhythm.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
pas-drum-rudiments-2018dcccc96de1726e19ba7fff00008669d1.pdf

Copy the above link into your browser. It is a .pdf of 40 Percussive Arts Society Rudiments. I keep it on my phone for reference. I really don't know why, most of them are committed to memory at this point.

The ones with an asterisk (*) are the original 26 American Standard.

The stickings are shown on most. For the doubles, it shows you what hand the pattern starts and ends on. The number above the note tells you how many total strokes if you want to read the music notation. The 10 stroke roll is the odd duck. It's the 9, a rest (not notated, that's different), then the 10th stroke.

You can learn them in any order you want, but for me I find it makes more sense to learn singles, doubles, the flam, and the drag first. The rest are basically composed of these, and it makes them easier to understand and play correctly.

And here is a video of the standard 26, slowly first then at speed.


EDIT: the 6 stroke roll is similar to the 10, only its first note, rest, then the 5 stroke roll. So R (rest) LLRRL. I always forget something ☹
There is a rudiment app available thru IOS, I rarely use it. But, there is one available.


I never had a drum teacher. I learned some from the "music teachers" or "band directors" while in school. I learned more from other drummers than anything. But, if you can find a teacher, DO THAT! Even an online course. It will give you a good base from which to start, or progress.

Do you have access to any drums at all?
 
pas-drum-rudiments-2018dcccc96de1726e19ba7fff00008669d1.pdf

Copy the above link into your browser. It is a .pdf of 40 Percussive Arts Society Rudiments. I keep it on my phone for reference. I really don't know why, most of them are committed to memory at this point.

The ones with an asterisk (*) are the original 26 American Standard.

The stickings are shown on most. For the doubles, it shows you what hand the pattern starts and ends on. The number above the note tells you how many total strokes if you want to read the music notation. The 10 stroke roll is the odd duck. It's the 9, a rest (not notated, that's different), then the 10th stroke.

You can learn them in any order you want, but for me I find it makes more sense to learn singles, doubles, the flam, and the drag first. The rest are basically composed of these, and it makes them easier to understand and play correctly.

And here is a video of the standard 26, slowly first then at speed.


EDIT: the 6 stroke roll is similar to the 10, only its first note, rest, then the 5 stroke roll. So R (rest) LLRRL. I always forget something ☹
Cheers for the reply I’ll start learning these rudiments. When you say slow then fast, do you mean like start the metronome at 60 play it for a couple minutes or so then bump it up like 65BPM?
 
You could also use these:


But don't stress out too much about it. Don't force reaching a higher number if you're not comfortable with it too much. I think that some of the "lower level" speeds on the Vic Firth site are already quite high if you don't know the rudiment yet.
Yeah I’ll try that. Think because I wanna learn green day songs there pretty quick so i wanna get fast with different rudiments but I wanna practice the right way you know
 
I made these a few years back but they are the most used rudiments in my playing. To be honest half of the "40 rudiments" are not going to be used in your day to day playing. It is still good to learn them for control, but get an A+ on a few rather than a D on all of them. Once you can nail one move on.
say I start slow at 60BPM at 8th notes, how long should I stay at that tempo for before I say “okay I’m happy to move to 65” that’s the problem I’m struggling with dunno when I should move on I keep second guessing my self thanks for answering
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Cheers for the reply I’ll start learning these rudiments. When you say slow then fast, do you mean like start the metronome at 60 play it for a couple minutes or so then bump it up like 65BPM?
You need to have them committed to muscle memory. The idea is to play them until you don't have to think about it. Once you are comfortable and can play them clean and even, then move it up. There is no time frame, everyone progresses at different rates. Also, when I say comfortable, clean, and even, that doesn't mean like 15 seconds. Try 5 minutes and see how well you can keep it together. There needs to be a time goal as well. If 5 minutes is no big deal, move it up. If 5 minutes is too much, slow it down. Don't get frustrated with it, you can always try again tomorrow. It's okay to move on to another rudiment if you want.

You won't be able to play them all at the same speed. Theoretically you should be able to, but this is almost never the case. Some will just get you hung up, and some will feel completely natural.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
When I learn new stuff I don't even use a metronome for the first bit. Get the pattern down. It's stressfull if you keep missing the mark. Once you have it memorized, say Rlrr Lrll for a paradiddle you can start using a metronome. Slow would be at a speed where it feels slow, and you are playing it tight. It is different for everyone. As you improve just bump it up a few bpm when it feels relaxed and easy..... If you do 1 a day you will find a day that you can't increase it. That is your max. (and playing for 20 seconds doesn't count, no bursts of cheating)

I usually start about 70 % of my max and jump up 5-10 bpm every few minutes but it honestly depends on what I am trying to achieve.

Use a metronome 100%.. If you are just starting, singles, doubles, paradiddle, and inverted paradiddle should take you a very long time before moving on.
 
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