Need a more "rock" setup for a project, is this idea insane or what?

BradGunnerSGT

Silver Member
I'm auditioning for a band playing much harder rock than I've been playing recently. The last few years, I've been playing in a country/rock/pop type of band, in a standard 1-up 1-down config with a single crash on the left side and a ride and a second crash on the right, with sometimes an extra crash or china on the right for flavor. With this new band, I will need to expand on what I normally bring to a gig, so I'll add a second floor tom (12/14F/16F). I'll also have my normal hi-hat and crash on the left, with a ride, crash, a set of hats on the right to use for when I play double bass (not blast beats, but there are some songs the need it), and a china on the right. Maybe another smaller crash on the far left, too.

I have a full setup of Yamaha 700 stands, but over the last few years ended up leaving them set up on my practice kit and taking out my Gibraltar flat-based stands instead. The flat-based stands are great for a simple 4 cymbal hats/crash/ride/crash setup and are much easier to haul around.

I will probably start with my Yamaha stands for this audition and the first few practices, but I know that I will want to start thinking about cutting down the weight and also about making it quick and easy to set up and tear down. I thought about the Gibraltar Stealth rack since I could leave it mostly set up and just put it in the back of the van all ready to go (maybe take off a boom or two and use the Yamaha memory locks on the boom arms).

So I had a wild thought over the weekend. Has anyone tried using the upper portions of any of the flat-based hardware and adding them to something like the Gibraltar Stealth side rack? I don't need the upper portions to be crazy heavy duty, as long as the base is stable. I also like that the upper tubes are smaller on the flat based stands so they "get out of the way" visually.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I'm auditioning for a band playing much harder rock than I've been playing recently. The last few years, I've been playing in a country/rock/pop type of band, in a standard 1-up 1-down config with a single crash on the left side and a ride and a second crash on the right, with sometimes an extra crash or china on the right for flavor. With this new band, I will need to expand on what I normally bring to a gig, so I'll add a second floor tom (12/14F/16F). I'll also have my normal hi-hat and crash on the left, with a ride, crash, a set of hats on the right to use for when I play double bass (not blast beats, but there are some songs the need it), and a china on the right. Maybe another smaller crash on the far left, too.

I have a full setup of Yamaha 700 stands, but over the last few years ended up leaving them set up on my practice kit and taking out my Gibraltar flat-based stands instead. The flat-based stands are great for a simple 4 cymbal hats/crash/ride/crash setup and are much easier to haul around.

I will probably start with my Yamaha stands for this audition and the first few practices, but I know that I will want to start thinking about cutting down the weight and also about making it quick and easy to set up and tear down. I thought about the Gibraltar Stealth rack since I could leave it mostly set up and just put it in the back of the van all ready to go (maybe take off a boom or two and use the Yamaha memory locks on the boom arms).

So I had a wild thought over the weekend. Has anyone tried using the upper portions of any of the flat-based hardware and adding them to something like the Gibraltar Stealth side rack? I don't need the upper portions to be crazy heavy duty, as long as the base is stable. I also like that the upper tubes are smaller on the flat based stands so they "get out of the way" visually.
The stealth rack is essentially just a low-slung standard Gibraltar rack, so in theory everything should fit together just fine. The physics of having the stand bits clamped to a low rack, however, may mean a larger-than-usual amount of torque applied at the clamp.

Think of the force with which you hit certain parts of your kit; the upper part of the stand acts like a lever. You apply force to one end (smacking a cymbal) and the other end wants to move it the other direction. In the worst two cases, the rack may start to wander along the floor, and/or the cymbal arm starts to rotate around the rack tube because the clamping pressure can't overcome the torque.

Having said that, it's done all the time, and maybe just one or two memory locks next to the rack clamps will keep there from being any problem. Just make sure it's all snug and that you're able to play in such a way that it doesn't stress the gear unduly.
 
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