Nashville's home recording ban

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I don't think it's political more so than business regulatory and city management. If it's just his personal recording studio I see no issue but if he is in realm of business then business regulations apply but I would think getting a business license would meet the standard and then allow some exception for such small businesses like they do traveling food courts.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
FTA:
…the suit is an attempt to protect Nashville's storied music scene from outdated zoning codes that segregate cities into commercial and residential categories while criminalizing the sort of creative spontaneity from which great music is born.
If this kind of law is allowed to stand, Nashville will eliminate any possibility of the birth of a company such as Apple, Qualcomm, or Hewlett-Packard (all started in a garage). So short-sited, all in a effort to protect some dinosaurs.
 

Chollyred

Senior Member
Could be why several people I know with home based studios in the area stay just outside of Nashville proper. I understand the city wanting to have distinct business and residential districts, but this ordinance is too restrictive. I'm guessing some of the old studios/venues in the area were behind the structuring of this in an attempt to develop a limited monopoly. As long as the studio is not creating a nuisance, and the owner has a legitimate business license, these small businesses (not just recording studios) should be ignored by code enforcement.
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
My wife and I moved my parents across country to live in a house across the street from us for the final years of their lives. My Mom decided she wanted to leave us their home to be used for a video production studio/rehearsal studio and for my wife's private therapy sessions. I went down to the City Code Enforcement Office and explained the situation. The City had never dealt with the parameters of our particular requests before but because we worked with them they literally bent over backwards to accommodate us. They created a special permit that when we stopped using the home for our intended purposes and sold the home that it would revert back to a private residence status. Long story short some beneficiaries--despite my mother's final wishes--threw a tantrum and made it known they would sue the family estate if they didn't get their "cut" of the home value that we ultimately dropped the plans to proceed.

The lesson to be learned here is simple: when you go through the proper channels with diplomacy I think most cities Code Enforcement will try to make it happen if at all possible. Sadly the gentleman in the article never pulled a permit. That likely would have changed the outcome of the situation he is facing now.
 

beatdat

Senior Member
This appears to be a zoning issue. There are good reasons why cities are divided into commercial, industrial and residential zones, but this does seem to be a bridge too far. Perhaps he could fare better, at least temporarily, by converting the studio from a business to a "private" club like some establishments did when no-smoking rules were implemented some time ago.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
It is shocking. If not resisted and emasculated, beheaded, drawn and quartered, tarred and feathered, and made to walk the plank...this is one bad precedent that would be set.

They have gone too far with this IMO. People are allowed to have people over even in residential zones. Birthday parties anyone?
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
This is a perfect example of the government butting its ugly head in where it doesn't belong. As long as the home studio is not bothering the neighbors (noise complaints, high traffic, etc), they should be able to do whatever they damn well please in their own home. ESPECIALLY in Nashville, where music is everything.

This is America, dammit!
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
The level of jackassery in the people who actually enforce this stuff is unbelievable, completely leaving aside all issues of whether such extreme zoning restrictions are good. They made him take down his YouTube channel.
They made him take down his YouTube channel.
I’m going to say it again—-city code enforcement MADE HIM take down his YouTube channel.
Now THAT’S some jackassery. Bold as hell. Just so bold.
And not only are they bold jackasses, they are bold jackasses with our tax money. The money we make with the sweat of our brow.
I just...wow.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
it was posted in the spirit of warning others in any city or town to be wary of such zoning regulations that might hinder their creative business.
In the 1990s I owned a very small house with a 4-car garage that I used as a studio. I worked there for almost 10 years, and in 2000 I bought a larger house with a semi-dilapidated garage, thinking I could tear it down and build a killer on-site studio that also functioned as a garage. In addition, the property next door had a 5-car (side-by-side) garage with a killer shop on the second floor. I went to the city zoning dept. and applied for a construction permit and, lo & behold, six months prior to me buying the new house large outbuildings were no longer permitted in the city limits. The reason: people were buying the smaller (1000 sq. ft.) homes for cheap and building outbuildings larger than the house, then providing services like auto body repair and smithing/welding and ruining the neighborhood with noise, traffic, and worse.

So, yeah. Check first.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Everything is regulated now-you practically can't dig a hole without permission. I remember people would dig ponds, lakes, heck one fella a canal from Gulf of Mexico inland (that was a big issue trying to get Florida core of engineers to take it over years later) without any permission, course they had plenty of explosives readily on hand too-that was common to all farmers and rural living as I remember growing up. Dang sort of like growing up in a Million Ways to Die in the West LOL. I'm always on the side of freedom-if it isn't increasing it or maintaining it then going wrong direction. Then too I tend to side with the underdog too-which small business has an even more difficult time to compete nowadays. So seems should be some allowances for small businesses.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
The article mentions a home owners association a bit. There's a big part of the problem. Nosey, snooty people with nothing better to do than stick their noses into other people's business when it doesn't meet their agenda. It's blatent discrimination. It might not be racist, might not be sexist, but it's still discrimination.

Lots of funeral homes are run out of residences. Are funerals illegal in Nashville too? I doubt it.

Our current system is broken.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Never mind the system...I’d just be happy to see that enforcement officer’s life ruined. You don’t make someone take down their YouTube channel because of zoning restrictions. He or she deserves to go be homeless under a bridge for their rest of their life.


I’m for real. Maybe it’s against board rules, but...you have to draw the line SOMEwhere...and my concern is that someone who would do that simply can’t be communicated with. They might as well be on another planet, where good judgment is nonexistent.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
+1 HOA's here in the greater OKC metro will shut down an in-home music teaching studio, recording studio, hair salon - permits required for garage sales etc. We had to be very careful when buying a home.
I bet none of the OKC code enforcers are broken enough people to make someone take down their own YouTube video. LOL
 
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