NARD Snare Solo Play through

Pass.of.E.r.a.

Gold Member
Hey everyone!

My drum teacher has me working through the NARD Snare Solos book because he knows how much I hate this kind of thing. And latin grooves, but I digress...
I'm expanding my repertoire and strengthening my grasp of the rudiments, and I thought it might be fun to film some of it for youtube and get some feedback from other drummers too!

So far I've done two songs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGJJLP7ayKc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyExXGik1pI

Speed-wise they're not where I'd like them, but I'm more interested in technique and keeping my stick height as low as possible but still playing dynamically which uses a different group of muscles than I'm used to using.

All feedback welcome (two the three or four people who actually read this thread. Maybe I should re-name it "Supraphoinc Demo").

-Jonathan
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I'm not sure what the speed should be but what I'm hearing seems to be at a tempo that one could march to. I played snare in school and we did a lot of marches and i marched in the Army so I have a good idea of the tempo. I'm not sure if these exercises are meant to be that but they sound great from here. For some reason most of the Your Playing threads get a lot of views but not many responses. Just keep doing what you are doing.
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
One thing I noticed is that you have great tap heights. Just a couple inches off the drum. Something I've been working on for 15 years.

I love rudimental drumming, but then again I was in competitive high school marching band and did drumline for several years (snare, tenors, and bass), so its awesome to see more people getting to it.

Going between 16th note and triplet stuff is something a lot of people can't grasp, so really dug that you nailed it.
 

STXBob

Gold Member
I think you're looking good. I can't see your left hand, but the little fingers of the right hand are staying on the stick, providing control. Your tempo is very consistent.

I *do* have two tiny quibbles, since you asked. :)

First, your double-stroke rolls are wonderfully even, but I can detect pulsing with the right hand. In other words, your right-hand double-stroke taps are ever so slightly stronger. ONE-E-and-a TWO-E-and-a, kind of thing. I'd feel confident in diagnosing you're right-side dominant.

Second, your flams sound great, but the grace/pickup note could be less strong. The main stroke is fine in both hands. If you were my student I'd have you practice keeping the grace note stroke more subdued. I like the grace note stroke to be very subtle, starting no more than 1-2 inches off the head. The lower the dynamic, the lower the grace-note stroke.

Neither of these things are obvious! They're very slight. But they're something to polish.

Great job and good luck getting through those books!
 

Pass.of.E.r.a.

Gold Member
I'm not sure what the speed should be but what I'm hearing seems to be at a tempo that one could march to. I played snare in school and we did a lot of marches and i marched in the Army so I have a good idea of the tempo. I'm not sure if these exercises are meant to be that but they sound great from here. For some reason most of the Your Playing threads get a lot of views but not many responses. Just keep doing what you are doing.
Thank you for responding! I hadn't thought of it from a marching perspective but that makes total sense. It's easy to get caught up in that youtube drumming/sensationalist mentality of playing fast for the sake of playing fast.

One thing I noticed is that you have great tap heights. Just a couple inches off the drum. Something I've been working on for 15 years.

I love rudimental drumming, but then again I was in competitive high school marching band and did drumline for several years (snare, tenors, and bass), so its awesome to see more people getting to it.

Going between 16th note and triplet stuff is something a lot of people can't grasp, so really dug that you nailed it.
Thank you very much for watching and commenting, I appreciate it!
A few years back my instructor had me spend 6 months on getting comfortable playing and hearing groupings of 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 & 9 and be able to play them, both with and without dynamics, and on more than just the snare. That was very challenging, but I see the benefits now.

Good stuff Jonathan. How's the band stuff doing?
Thank you Andy, not so great actually, but it's giving me time to focus on my playing.

I think you're looking good. I can't see your left hand, but the little fingers of the right hand are staying on the stick, providing control. Your tempo is very consistent.

I *do* have two tiny quibbles, since you asked. :)

First, your double-stroke rolls are wonderfully even, but I can detect pulsing with the right hand. In other words, your right-hand double-stroke taps are ever so slightly stronger. ONE-E-and-a TWO-E-and-a, kind of thing. I'd feel confident in diagnosing you're right-side dominant.

Second, your flams sound great, but the grace/pickup note could be less strong. The main stroke is fine in both hands. If you were my student I'd have you practice keeping the grace note stroke more subdued. I like the grace note stroke to be very subtle, starting no more than 1-2 inches off the head. The lower the dynamic, the lower the grace-note stroke.

Neither of these things are obvious! They're very slight. But they're something to polish.

Great job and good luck getting through those books!
YES!! Thank you for pointing that out! My doubles have always suffered from that, and as much as I practice left hand led doubles accenting the second note, I can get my doubles sounding even when they're on their own, but not in context. Back to the practice pad for me.

Bob, what are your thoughts on the crescendo snare roll in the second piece?

Haha, with the grace note, that must be my rock drummer tendencies poking through. I'll keep that in mind with my next play through.

-Jonathan
 

STXBob

Gold Member
YES!! Thank you for pointing that out! My doubles have always suffered from that, and as much as I practice left hand led doubles accenting the second note, I can get my doubles sounding even when they're on their own, but not in context. Back to the practice pad for me.
I found that doing with my left hand everything I usually do with my right hand immeasurably helped my left rise to the same level. From opening doors to answering the phone. Yes, the practice pad helps. But sometimes just using disused muscles helps, too. YMMV. ;-)

Bob, what are your thoughts on the crescendo snare roll in the second piece?
I thought the doubles were ever so slightly uneven.

Emmanuelle Caplette has a diddle control exercise video on her Facebook page that might help you: https://www.facebook.com/EmmanuelleCapletteDrummer/?fref=ts Unfortunately I can't figure out how to link it directly. But it's a real treat to work the diddles, if you play it at P then MF then F.

Haha, with the grace note, that must be my rock drummer tendencies poking through. I'll keep that in mind with my next play through.
Good idea. ;-) Your flams in the first video more often than not resemble double-stops. It's something to work in front of a mirror.
 
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