Name vs. title

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
From the history of Zildjian cymbals on their website:

While Avedis’s craft certainly earned himself a name, it was the Sultan Osman II the Young who granted Avedis the Zildjian (Zildjian, meaning "cymbal smith" in Armenian, with zil being Turkish for "cymbal," ci meaning "maker", and ian being the Armenian suffix meaning "son of") title in 1623, along with the freedom to set out making cymbals beyond the walls of the Ottoman palace.

If I’m to read this right, Avedis’ family name isn’t known since Zildjian is a title, not a name. Or at least the site doesn’t give it.

Anyone have a follow up on what his family name really is? Or is it one of those things that was abandoned when his offspring came over to America and they just used the title?
 

bongoman

Junior Member
He may not have had a second name. Or he may have had one like “of Suchandsuch Town” or “son of Dadsname”, both super common surname formats, both easily replaced by “Careername”.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Who knows. My last name translates to either Son of Martin, or Martinson. Half the alphabet for nothing. My stepfather's last name translates to MF'er. All of it is lost over time, no one knows who Martin was. No one knows who the original MF'er was either.

It doesnt matter anymore. Smith's dont make anything, Butchers dont cut meat, Johnsons dont have a father named John.

For all we know Avedis' last name could have been Williams and its Armenian translation is "killer of dragons, keeper of salt".
 

buddhadrummer

Junior Member
I know one thing. Ever since I learned that fact, whenever I accidentally whack my finger with a hammer, it's followed by my muttering the words "sonova cymbalsmith!"
 
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tfgretsch

Junior Member
From the history of Zildjian cymbals on their website:

While Avedis’s craft certainly earned himself a name, it was the Sultan Osman II the Young who granted Avedis the Zildjian (Zildjian, meaning "cymbal smith" in Armenian, with zil being Turkish for "cymbal," ci meaning "maker", and ian being the Armenian suffix meaning "son of") title in 1623, along with the freedom to set out making cymbals beyond the walls of the Ottoman palace.

If I’m to read this right, Avedis’ family name isn’t known since Zildjian is a title, not a name. Or at least the site doesn’t give it.

Anyone have a follow up on what his family name really is? Or is it one of those things that was abandoned when his offspring came over to America and they just used the title?
according to Matt Brennan's book kick it ,in 1905 in Turkey,armenians in turkey faced ethnic persecution , due to the family involvement with the resistance efforts, this caused the head of the Zildjian family Aram to flee . in 1909 his nephew Avedis Zildjian the 3rd, immigrated to boston usa, started a candy manufacturing business, then in 1929 Aram sought out avedis, to offer him family secerets to making cymbals. From this info it appears the name Zildjian is Real ? Maybe aram zildjian used another name when he fled turkey and came to the usa ?
 

johnwesley

Silver Member
If I remember correctly, it was Nathan Goldstein who was given the honor of Zildjian by the sultan. Goldstein became known or at least thought of as having the last name Zildjian because of the sign hanging outside his shop which read. "ZILDJIAN Cymbals. Please, come in and judge for yourself. Open daily 8-5. Closed Saturday."
 

Peedy

Senior Member
If I remember correctly, it was Nathan Goldstein who was given the honor of Zildjian by the sultan. Goldstein became known or at least thought of as having the last name Zildjian because of the sign hanging outside his shop which read. "ZILDJIAN Cymbals. Please, come in and judge for yourself. Open daily 8-5. Closed Saturday."
Ah, generational humor.
 
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