My new cymbals

Hey guys, this is my first time writing a post here, but i really need some advice. My parents gave me new cymbals for Christmas. They are the Meinl MCS series and i got the 16' crash, 14' hi-hat and 20' ride. I like their sound, but i actually feel bad, because i kinda wanted paiste beacuse i think they are better and most of my favorite drummers use them. One thing that me me feel better is that a lot of young drummers use Meinl and I just started playing in a band with teenagers. I kinda want to stick with Meinl and i don't know what cymbals to buy next. I usually play rock and metal and i want to have 3 crashes 1 ride which i already have a hi-hat which i also have and i want just 2 crash cymbals more. Can you give me some tips on what cymbals to buy? thank you so much
 

brushes

Well-known member
First of all: Meinl makes some superb cymbals, Paiste is not better or worse, neither Sabian or Zildjian or UFIP or Istanbul. They all "taste" a bit different, which ones you prefer in the end, is 100% subjective.

That said, it is hard to give any sound advice as long as you don't say how much money you can/are willing to spend and what kind of sound (high pitched or lower pitched, effect cymbal or not) you are looking after. In any way: Look for cymbals on the used market, it will save you tons of money, if you don't have tons of money. I suggest that you get to kow your cymbals first before considering buying new cymbals. Hint: play those cymbals for now (they are new, decent cymbals for starting), get to know them and while you do so: save up some money, then, some day, buy higher grade cymbals if you can. B8 or B20 bronze cymbals. (Hint: Most turkish brands (Masterwork, Turkish, Anatolian, Agean) will be more affordable and much(!) higher quality than the cheaper stuff from Paiste, Sabian and Zildjian)

Don't stick to a brand because drummer A or B uses those cymbals. The cymbals that you use should reflect YOU not someone else.
 
Well i just want to buy two crashes more and i was think of Meinl classics custom. I don't like dark cymbals so i am looking for bright or medium cymbals. My budget is about 170$ for one crash. Actually i live in Bulgaria and it comes to 280 bgn and i found a cymbal i want which is 300 bucks so i might buy it. Thanks for the tips you gave me. I might even think of checking out some other brands as well before buying new cymbals. Actually can anyone tell me how much money do i need for a decent crash?
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Have a look at the Zildjian S line. Very consistent and very affordable. They are a massive step up from the MCS series.

Don't worry about what gear anyone else is playing, especially your favourite drummers. They're all being endorsed and what you're hearing is all mixed and processed. Plus what gets used in the studio is rarely what gets used on stage.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Try not to hurry. I know that money just burns in your pocket!

I was going to suggest the newer Zlidjian I line. They replaced their entry level stuff with these. And they're quite an upgrade. I think they're also better than the MCS.

And then, just look at used, EVERYTHING. If you like bright, Zildjian A Customs used might be up your alley?

Take your time.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
If you follow your favorite drummers you'll note they will change their cymbals-brands, etc. It's about hunting for a sound-you should do the same. Drumming is like fingers we all have them but we all have different finger prints-we all play drums but we all have small differences (some large). Though high dollar usually equates to better cymbals ,now not so much ,because so many makers and competition you can find excellent cymbals that don't break your piggy bank. Use your ears not your eyes.
 

brushes

Well-known member
What you could do, is to look out of a used Meinl MCS 18" Crash or China for a start. It won't cost much (new, less than 100 Euros, used it should be available for roughly 50 or 60 bucks) and give you some flexibility and time to save some more money in order to get a pro-grade set or cymbals. And it will fit with your existing cymals.

Rule of thumb: If possible don't buy cheap after buying that first set of cymbals, because you will buy at least twice then - which means you will burn more money than buying once "right".

You could e.g. look out later (once you are more experienced) for a used set of Zildjian A's or Sabian AA's. Those are usually halfway affordable, quite versatile and can be widely found. Once you know exactly what kind of cymbals you want (which will(!) take some time), you can sell those cymbals without much financial loss and buy the ones that exactly resemble your sound ideals (this is when you start to go after special cymbals). Once you want to buy high-end cymbals, prepare to spend LOTS of money. A really good ride usually costs between 300 and 550 Euros.
 
Since Bulgaria is part of the European Union, you can just check out ebay - shipping won't be too high and no customs. Mixing cymbals isn't really a problem and you can get some experience what you like. Another advantage of used cymbals: if you break them, it's not the end of the world. Not saying that you will break a cymbal (do you have a teacher to help preventing that?) but you wouldn't be the first young Metal fan who does that. :)
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
Can you give me some tips on what cymbals to buy? thank you so much
If there's a used cymbal market where you are .... look into that. Your money will go a lot farther. If Paiste is where your heart is ..... nothing wrong with that. They make excellent cymbals. And if you like brighter cymbals .... they do bright. 2002's are premium grade .... have stood the test of time ..... and still going strong. If the 2002 line is too heavy a lift, cost wise ..... look into PST7's.

If you want to stick with Meinl ..... look into the Generation X perhaps. Also Classics Custom Brilliant.
 

iCe

Senior Member
My 2 cents...
Determine your budget and how much you're willing to spend. The great thing about cymbal packs is value; you get a free cymbal most of the time. The downside is that you're stuck with predetermined cymbals that might not entirely fit your taste. Having said that; if you're new to cymbals it's quite a task to figure out your sound, because there are so many different sounds that i suggest to pick a pack and after a few years reflect on your taste to see if it changed.
I'm all for working your way up from beginner to semi-pro to pro cymbals. That way you can crack and bust the cheaper ones before your technique is adequate and you know what sounds you like.

On Thomann.de it's quite easy to select cymbal packs and set a max budget. Filter through them and pick a set you like best.
 
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Actually i got into somthing
If there's a used cymbal market where you are .... look into that. Your money will go a lot farther. If Paiste is where your heart is ..... nothing wrong with that. They make excellent cymbals. And if you like brighter cymbals .... they do bright. 2002's are premium grade .... have stood the test of time ..... and still going strong. If the 2002 line is too heavy a lift, cost wise ..... look into PST7's.

If you want to stick with Meinl ..... look into the Generation X perhaps. Also Classics Custom Brilliant.
Thank you so much i actually decided to mix Meinl and Paiste. I will get to PST 7 crashes and i am going to rock. Thank you so much for all of the tips!
 

RickP

Gold Member
Buy what cymbals sound good to your ear . There are no rules when it comes to buying a cymbal . Forget labels and manufacturers . If you play a cymbal and you like it and it fits a need or purpose for you buy it if you can afford it . We all have our brand preferences but that should not limit your cymbal selection parameters - all the cymbal manufacturers make cymbals that sound good , you just need to determine what sounds good to you .
 
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