My Music City Custom Snare Verdict

s1212z

Silver Member
You make some valid points. But Pearl isn't the only one doing things similar to your point #6.
Are they solid shells? I know you can buy a raw solid shell and finish it your self…seems to be suppliers in US and Europe and then sell it off. But these are small shops, not Pearl size. I don’t claim to be an expert or builder, just what I’m seeing. And I see many will use a select craftsman for their expertise in certain materials. But top of my head for solid shells for in-house shells I believe (please correct me if wrong):

N&C
Craviotto
A&F
DW (PureTimber LLC)
Tama
Longo
Gretsch
Tree House
Unix
Doc Sweeney
Woodland Perc
Summit
Antonio

Not sure on Dunnett. I believe Canopus partnered with master craftsmen at Antonio drums in Italy for their solids (soft maple) but do others in-house I believe…they may go to select builders for certain things. Ford drums, not sure. They are many more, I don’t know them all. I made a mistake on N&C only doing same species rings, it appears they do both (maple or same). I will credit Pearl that at least they said they have a single source builder, I feel that is important. I see Johnny Craviotto built snares (by him) have gone up in value since his passing, not sure if this reasonable or not but I guess these things are bound to happen. But something to be said about experience IMO.
 

someguy01

Platinum Member
Too much semantics.
That's a real purty drum you dun got yerself there Mr. Jones! I hope it brings you all the joy you could ask and then some.
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
Too much semantics.
That's a real purty drum you dun got yerself there Mr. Jones! I hope it brings you all the joy you could ask and then some.
Thanks so much, man. And yeah, the "semantics" are mostly rubbish to me. In my mind, this drum is about heritage and symbolism, not factory specs. Its sound is of central importance, of course, but it has allegorical implications that supersede the tedium of market forces. I'll be taking this shell to the afterlife if I can find a way to sneak it in.
 

dwsabianguy

Senior Member
(please correct me if wrong):

Gretsch

I would be very surprised if Gretsch made their solid shells in house. Everything else made in SC has Keller shells. And I have seen one or two Gretsch snares with Craviotto shells...

I'd also be surprised if Ronn Dunnett was putting his name on shells he wasn't making in-house. He's got the George Way name for drums that are made under his supervision, but with shells not actually made by him (and whatever employees he has).
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
1) N&C has a custom brass throw off, Craviotto has a really nice throw-off as well. Some else stated the PMC is a $30 throw off and quite frankly, that looks about right. If it functions, great but we are talking $1k here to be spoiled with best possible.

2) Tube lugs make sense to me here. When you have them them split, you put tension on edge as opposed to a tube lug design that distributes this tension off the shell. Plus it's a lot less hardware attached to the shell compared to individual lugs. Whether the tension theory has a sonic difference is arguable (but puts less tension on a shell like an SS which makes sense for longevity or stressing in moisture conditions). Certainly less hardware on shell has a sonic effect

3) 100% brass lugs are are more costly but I'm an absolute proponent and make more sense from a sonic perspective as a so called "resonating alloy". Plus they have their 'nodal point' mounting which makes sense to me as well. These are the appointments I want on a high-end drum. I believe Craviotto's are brass as well (just plated)

4) N&C makes all their re-enforcement rings to match the species of the wood shell. I prefer this both conceptually and aesthetically; especially when isolating for so called 'sonic purity' here. The other side of the argument is that historically, un-matched rings happened all the time and Craviotto does the same. But I have no doubt this is more costly and labor intensive on N&C opposed to having a line of maple rings ready for mass production. Does this actually have a sonic influence....I've asked this before and remains a mystery. But I believe enough small details add up to a major detail.

5) Oil finishes are usually cheaper, Pearl could have cut a bit here just on this alone. I happen to prefer oil and their inlays are nice so this is really minor and a choice.

6) And finally, we know N&C and Craviotto are making their shells in-house; they are responsible from point A to Z in the process, US made guaranteed. I don't know where PMC shell is coming from but all signs point to Taiwan. N&C are not paying a worker overseas a fraction of labor cost, sticking the customer a US/Japan/German price and then putting a big US flag as a campaign trickery punchline to justify a boutique price. If you don't read between the lines, you may think this is 100% US made (it's just assembled). I have nothing against Taiwan, they make many great drums as well but we know it's cheaper....I'm sorry but I find this a bit sleazy. Again, they are great sounding drums (at least on video) but if they are saving significant overhead then unfair to stick it on the customer here....just drop the price to make it fair.



Thank you, but I have no issue if someone opposing views on my gear choices. I've learned alot reading on boards just to hear what people play, what they like, what they don't like. In the end, it's a personal thing so it's only a discussion in the end and never right or wrong. I honestly never thought this would rain on the parade, CMJ seems beyond overjoyed with a great drum to play that it would be impossible but if by some slim chance you enjoy your drum less due to this discussion, my apologies.

I actually that N&C makes literally some of the best snares that exist. I'm obviously hardcore Gretsch but even I have the "One Headlight" N&C snare.

However - none of that matters all because this is CM's thread about his new snare and I don't find comparing it to other snares, etc. particularly tasteful or useful.
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
Congrats!!! Beautiful snare!!
Thanks, Freddy. I also appreciate the comment you made in my initial thread on this snare. You explained that you've read a lot of my posts in this forum and that, based upon my preferred snare characteristics, you thought walnut would be the better choice for me. As it turns out, you were right.
 

s1212z

Silver Member
I would be very surprised if Gretsch made their solid shells in house. Everything else made in SC has Keller shells. And I have seen one or two Gretsch snares with Craviotto shells...
They claim made at their Ridgeland plant in SC for their current solids (USA made). But if it's back when they made Stanton Moore sigs, then they may be Vaugncraft....so maybe both?

I'd also be surprised if Ronn Dunnett was putting his name on shells he wasn't making in-house. He's got the George Way name for drums that are made under his supervision, but with shells not actually made by him (and whatever employees he has).

I'd be surprised too.

However - none of that matters all because this is CM's thread about his new snare and I don't find comparing it to other snares, etc. particularly tasteful or useful.

Well, Larry asked where my perspective was coming from on my '5 points' so I gave it. I can't be asked an opinion then be accused of being distasteful in a fact driven response.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I'm a little late to the party and when I first clicked in this thread it was already at six pages, which I just figured must be filled with happy chatter about what I'm sure is an awesome snare drum.

Well, I guess it mostly is, but...um, wow.

What makes the whole side topic so much more ironic is this email...

Dear (Winston_Wolf)
Thank you for your email. The MCC USA Made Solid shell snare drums are manufactured and steam bent here in the US. That is why the line carries Made in the USA on the tags.
Hope this answers your question

Your Pearl Corporation Team,
Support Department

So if it matters, there you have it.
 

s1212z

Silver Member
So if it matters, there you have it.
So what was your original question? Sounds like you just happened to be asking the exact same question I was. Guessing because it's not entirely clear since the Music City is made in the Masterworks facility overseas while carrying a Nashville TN tag; so sort of a snarky response saying it's on the tag. Nonetheless, thanks for clarifying (y)
 

C.M. Jones

Diamond Member
Dear (Winston_Wolf)
Thank you for your email. The MCC USA Made Solid shell snare drums are manufactured and steam bent here in the US. That is why the line carries Made in the USA on the tags.
Hope this answers your question

Your Pearl Corporation Team,
Support Department

So if it matters, there you have it.
Thanks for providing the definitive point of origin, Mr. Wolf. This should bring a close to peripheral pettiness. My Music City Custom snare was born and bred in Nashville, USA. Now we can all get some sleep tonight. :)
 
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