My humble take on good drummers and OK drummers

Drumlove65

Senior Member
So many drummers who've enjoyed some success seem to rely on a whole lot of flash and little substance. I don't give a hoot if someone can play a million miles an hour with a 20 piece set. I would much rather listen to a drummer who with a basic 4 piece set up make the drums metaphorically come alive. I would watch Gergo Borlai with his Mapex bop kit before I would spend a considerable amount of time ferreting out the flash of a Mike Mangini or Mike Portnoy. I don't want to convey that people shouldn't have their own taste in drumming technique of course listen to Dream Theater till your ears bleed if you like but I guess in my older years I appreciate more what drummers do with less than with more.

I will of course invite contrary views.
 

ncc

Silver Member
I think there are also a lot of drummers with both a whole lot of flash and a whole lot of substance. :) It really depends on what you are playing, right? It is very hard to play R&R and New Country covers without a fairly full kit. But if you are playing jazz or MOR stuff a small kit is perfect. I agree I would like to listen to a really good drummer with a small kit then one with a big kit that simply overplays. However, it the large flash kit is played tastefully, you will hear a lot of nice tones. The 2 best drummers I ever heard (live) were Gene Krupa (snare tom bass) and Carmine Appice (too many drums to count). Ok, this dates me I know. :)
 

Arky

Platinum Member
My humble take is that I will of course invite using the search function.
Yes, this forum has seen a few similar threads before... sigh.
 

Pocket-full-of-gold

Platinum Member
Ah, two birds with one stone. Chops vs groove and big kit vs small kits all rolled into one thread.

My humble opinion. A good drummer is not determined by the size of their kit or how many (or how little) notes they play. They are determined by what they say on that kit and how those notes place within the context of their music.

I get equal amounts of joy listening to Danny Carey or Nicko McBrain as I do listening to Steve Jordan or Steve Gadd. Just for different reasons........because of their different musical interpretations, rather than in spite of them.

Context is everything. Without it, the world gets tainted with a "one size fits all" broad stroke........and a "good" musician knows the world just doesn't work that way.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
I recently came back to the sport of drumming after a long long time of not playing.
I have been involved in open mic nights and jam nights for the last 9 months.
Of course I have been evaluating other drummers to find out where I fit in.

Frankly, I am sick and tired of evaluating and rating other drummers.
And I am sick and tired of rating myself.

Over the last few weeks I have been simply forgetting all of that stuff and I'm just having fun playing.


.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
So many drummers who've enjoyed some success seem to rely on a whole lot of flash and little substance. I don't give a hoot if someone can play a million miles an hour with a 20 piece set.

I will of course invite contrary views.
I'll just throw a name here: Simon Phillips...

... and that would be my contrary view :)

It covers many topics at once, small vs big kits, open handed drumming, double bass kits, playing for the songs, chops vs groove, less is more, overplaying, how to be musical, odd time signatures, speed, control, techniques, versatility, consistency, polyrhythms, interdependence... many topics found on hundred of threads with just one guy.

Like PFOG said, context is everything and some drummers seems to master all contexts...
 
W

wy yung

Guest
So many drummers who've enjoyed some success seem to rely on a whole lot of flash and little substance. I don't give a hoot if someone can play a million miles an hour with a 20 piece set. I would much rather listen to a drummer who with a basic 4 piece set up make the drums metaphorically come alive. I would watch Gergo Borlai with his Mapex bop kit before I would spend a considerable amount of time ferreting out the flash of a Mike Mangini or Mike Portnoy. I don't want to convey that people shouldn't have their own taste in drumming technique of course listen to Dream Theater till your ears bleed if you like but I guess in my older years I appreciate more what drummers do with less than with more.

I will of course invite contrary views.

Troll alert.



.....................................
 

PQleyR

Platinum Member
Alright guys, this is just my opinion...but I think it's a good idea to drive on the left hand side of the road.


I will of course invite contrary views.
 

Mad About Drums

Pollyanna's Agent
Alright guys, this is just my opinion...but I think it's a good idea to drive on the left hand side of the road.


I will of course invite contrary views.
We could have a lengthy discussion on this very important topic Ben...

Which is better?

Driving on the left in a right handed steering wheel car?

Driving on the left in a left handed steering wheel car?

Driving on the right in a right handed steering wheel car?

Driving on the right in a left handed steering wheel car?

Should we have a car with two steering wheels and six pedals?

How does this affect us when riding a motorbike?

How does this affect us when driving outside the UK?
 

Jeff Almeyda

Senior Consultant
No offense but why should we care about your personal taste in music and drummers?

Also, you sound out of touch. If you think that Dream Theater "makes your ears bleed", then you should listen to Meshuggah.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
The clutch is that pedal on the left that most Euro's ride all of the time wearing out the clutch plate. The ones with out the clutch rest their foot on the brake constantly leaving the brake light on. This is mostly the Canadians that visit our lovely state .
 

loki03xlh

Senior Member
So many drummers who've enjoyed some success seem to rely on a whole lot of flash and little substance. I don't give a hoot if someone can play a million miles an hour with a 20 piece set. I would much rather listen to a drummer who with a basic 4 piece set up make the drums metaphorically come alive. I would watch Gergo Borlai with his Mapex bop kit before I would spend a considerable amount of time ferreting out the flash of a Mike Mangini or Mike Portnoy. I don't want to convey that people shouldn't have their own taste in drumming technique of course listen to Dream Theater till your ears bleed if you like but I guess in my older years I appreciate more what drummers do with less than with more.

I will of course invite contrary views.
I assume you also think the Mona Lisa would look much better if it was just a black and white sketch on the back of a cocktail napkin. Within the context and style of music you play, more drums, cymbals, etc. are just added colors available for the drummer to paint his art with.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
you have a point ;)

TBH, yes. Always thought she was a bit of a minger! ;)
My first two cars had a clutch,and NYPD 3 wheel scooters have a clutch as well.I drove a Triumph TR-4 for around a year,and a Chevy Malibu 4 speed for two years.

I've actually been to the Louve and saw the Mona Lisa.It's a lot smaller than most think.Still,an impressive piece of work.

Steve B
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
I'd just like to point out that resting the left foot on the clutch pedal will only wear out the clutch plate (friction disc) if the clutch is partially disengaged.

More likely is that the clutch release bearing will get worn.
 

Drumlove65

Senior Member
No offense but why should we care about your personal taste in music and drummers?

Also, you sound out of touch. If you think that Dream Theater "makes your ears bleed", then you should listen to Meshuggah.
Well I thought this forum invited all views not just ones with which you agree. I guess you're worldview would best belong in some totalitarian state. I guess you're on side with Putin

I assume you also think the Mona Lisa would look much better if it was just a black and white sketch on the back of a cocktail napkin. Within the context and style of music you play, more drums, cymbals, etc. are just added colors available for the drummer to paint his art with.
You've missed my point completely. I think Gergo Borlai with 4 drums is the real Mona Lisa and the rest are glam posers
 
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