My first deer!

The Shepherd

Active Member
My wife's weenie dog Otis loves him a squirrel. We would occasionally find him on the porch chewing on a squirrel foot. There is only 1 squirrel left around our house. He is a fat squirrel and Otis sooo wants him.

Right now poor Otis is dealing with physical issues so that squirrel will have to wait. Once he is better though, that squirrel better put his game face back on.
I have a Greyhound. Squirrels at dog parks are used to regular dogs. Bonnie has caught a few lazy ones in her time. They are so much faster than a regular dog, surprisingly so.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I have a Greyhound. Squirrels at dog parks are used to regular dogs. Bonnie has caught a few lazy ones in her time. They are so much faster than a regular dog, surprisingly so.
They are smart too. Squirrels learn tactics and can solve puzzles. They are a formidable adversary for whatever hunts them for sure.

I have a Whippet/Min Pin mix also. She was fast like a greyhound when she was young. She is an old lady now.
 

JackWhite

Member
I'm 57. Retired Army combat veteran. Never been deer hunting. Always wanted to give it a try. The fact that my wife can't eat park or beef (due to allergies) gave me additional incentive.

A few months ago I bought a license and started tip toeing through my woods. No luck. On December 27th my luck changed.

As soon as I hit the woods I saw 4 deer. They saw me but weren't that impressed. Trotted just out of range. I decided to circle around the back of my property hoping to catch them upwind. It worked.

Just as I emerged from the branches,of some white pines, I saw a big doe standing atop a small hitt at a distance of only 50 meters. She was staring at me motionless; a perfect broadside. I braced my shotgun against a tree, aimed carefully and let loose a 12 gauge slug. The deer jumped and disappeared. I racked another round and walked up the hill.

The deer was laying only about 10-15 meters from initial impact. Stone cold dead. It was the cleanest of kills; exactly what I wanted. When I walked up to the animal I felt a tremendous sense of responsibility. I immediately texted all my experienced deer hunter buddies asking for their help in gutting it. No dice. I decided to do or myself, not really knowing what I'm doing and treating it like very big bluegill.

When I arrived at the butcher, he complimented me on the "excellent" job I did cleaning the animal. He was also very pleased that I brought it to him right away. The other big compliment I received was from my neighbor. When hearing that I stalked the deer, he said "you earned that."

It's all in the freezer. About half of it will be be gifts to close friends. The rest will be special meals.
It was actually very interesting to read your story. I congratulate you that it turned out the way you planned. Thanks for sharing. Looking forward to more hunting stories.
 
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NouveauCliche

Senior Member
I'm 57. Retired Army combat veteran. Never been deer hunting. Always wanted to give it a try. The fact that my wife can't eat park or beef (due to allergies) gave me additional incentive.

A few months ago I bought a license and started tip toeing through my woods. No luck. On December 27th my luck changed.

As soon as I hit the woods I saw 4 deer. They saw me but weren't that impressed. Trotted just out of range. I decided to circle around the back of my property hoping to catch them upwind. It worked.

Just as I emerged from the branches,of some white pines, I saw a big doe standing atop a small hitt at a distance of only 50 meters. She was staring at me motionless; a perfect broadside. I braced my shotgun against a tree, aimed carefully and let loose a 12 gauge slug. The deer jumped and disappeared. I racked another round and walked up the hill.

The deer was laying only about 10-15 meters from initial impact. Stone cold dead. It was the cleanest of kills; exactly what I wanted. When I walked up to the animal I felt a tremendous sense of responsibility. I immediately texted all my experienced deer hunter buddies asking for their help in gutting it. No dice. I decided to do or myself, not really knowing what I'm doing and treating it like very big bluegill.

When I arrived at the butcher, he complimented me on the "excellent" job I did cleaning the animal. He was also very pleased that I brought it to him right away. The other big compliment I received was from my neighbor. When hearing that I stalked the deer, he said "you earned that."

It's all in the freezer. About half of it will be be gifts to close friends. The rest will be special meals.

Very cool!

While I'm not a hunter - a lot of my family hunts. Most of them Bow Hunt - which I Really appreciate from a natural/primal perspective.

They do elk and deer out here - great meat!

Congrats!!

(Also my brother has done Oryx, which was a beautiful animal that he mounted, etc.)
 
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And we the humans are hunted by them too! Try as I might, keeping them out of my barn or my house has proved to be a multi-year Sisyphean undertaking. They know how to exploit all the weak points to my various structures.
Any animal I hunt I eat and use from that animal whatever I can . Tanned hides have been used for gloves , clothing and such but main reason is lean animal protein. Northern east coast (and other cold climates) deer have exceptionally thick hides compared to their southern relatives, so much so that I use a square patch as a hoop protector for my pedal.
That being said I don’t hunt squirrel. I have eaten it and it’s not bad at all .I can’t kill any nuisance animal unless I actually eat and use that animal.
Since I have so many squirrels at times and I won’t kill what I don’t eat, I live cage trap them and relocate them.
Anyone doing this keep in mind you must take them at least three ( sometimes 5) miles away or they WILL come back by climbing trees and using landmarks and in the absence of that , like a tree top topography to find their way back . I tested this by spraying a small bit of fluorescent pink or green paint on the tail tip and I’ve had them come back right to my garage from 2-3 miles away . Smart little buggers.
Some years I don’t need to relocate any but other years my neighborhood and surrounding area is completely overrun with them . They chew their way into soffit’s of garages and homes to gain access because the surrounding habitat is saturated with other squirrels.
Also if live trapped, covering the trap with a towel while transporting keeps them calm .
And as always , be careful when trapping , handling, transporting and releasing them .
 
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someguy01

Platinum Member
Ingredients:
1 jar Frank's Red Hot sauce
Tender sized chicken pieces
Flour
Parsley
Crushed red pepper
Heated oil or fryer

Mix dry ingredients in a glass bowl. Parsley and crushed red pepper are for decoration and flavor, add to your liking.
Pour Frank's into another bowl.
Dip the chicken in the Frank's, then the flour mix.
Repeat the above step (double dip).
Drop in fryer until the chicken fully floats.
Remove, eat, never be bored with chicken again. Best fried chicken ever.

If you want an even crispier, lighter crust, use 50/50 mix of flour and self rising flour instead of just flour. Even bester fried chicken ever.
Try brining your chicken in pickle juice first. You'll thank me later.
 

Hewitt2

Senior Member
Since I have so many squirrels at times and I won’t kill what I don’t eat, I live cage trap them and relocate them.
Anyone doing this keep in mind you must take them at least three ( sometimes 5) miles away or they WILL come back by climbing trees and using landmarks and in the absence of that , like a tree top topography to find their way back .
I love this and I have the same mentality. I will always live trap for nuisance animals like squirrels and racoons and relocate appropriately....
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I can’t kill any nuisance animal unless I actually eat and use that animal.
I've only had to kill 2 so far in the 6 years I've been living in the woods. I have 5 dogs, they do a good job of keeping the property clear. There was one whistle pig burrowed under my back porch. His den was causing damage to the porch and the dogs couldn't get into it. He ended up biting one of the dogs so I had to kill it.

The second was a cat under our crawl space pulling out insulation to make a home with. I would have actually been okay with the cat had it not started destroying my house. The dogs couldn't get rid of it, I couldn't catch it.

I love this and I have the same mentality. I will always live trap for nuisance animals like squirrels and racoons and relocate appropriately....
I cant set traps because of the dogs. I get no satisfaction from this other than the problem is solved. I'd much rather the dogs just chase everything off. I feel like twice in 6 years is acceptable.

I do have to set mouse traps. There is way too many of them living out here. During the winter when they try to come in we catch dozens. This I do not feel bad about.
 
I've only had to kill 2 so far in the 6 years I've been living in the woods. I have 5 dogs, they do a good job of keeping the property clear. There was one whistle pig burrowed under my back porch. His den was causing damage to the porch and the dogs couldn't get into it. He ended up biting one of the dogs so I had to kill it.

The second was a cat under our crawl space pulling out insulation to make a home with. I would have actually been okay with the cat had it not started destroying my house. The dogs couldn't get rid of it, I couldn't catch it.


I cant set traps because of the dogs. I get no satisfaction from this other than the problem is solved. I'd much rather the dogs just chase everything off. I feel like twice in 6 years is acceptable.

I do have to set mouse traps. There is way too many of them living out here. During the winter when they try to come in we catch dozens. This I do not feel bad about.
Sometimes it IS a necessary evil .
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
They are smart too. Squirrels learn tactics and can solve puzzles. They are a formidable adversary for whatever hunts them for sure.

I've seen these tactics and problem solving as I try to avoid them in my car;

Left? RIGHT? No wait . . .. Right Left Right Right? . . . Ri . . . . .

Either that or they're fearless.

"Hooold! Hooooold!!"
 

someguy01

Platinum Member
They are smart too. Squirrels learn tactics and can solve puzzles. They are a formidable adversary for whatever hunts them for sure.
Crows can recognize your face. And they remember you.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Crows can recognize your face. And they remember you.
I watched a show on birds. There was a part about how smart crows are. One of the examples was an intersection where the crows had actually learned traffic patterns and the lights and knew when it was safe to go into the road to get food. Impressive to say the least.
 

WallyY

Platinum Member
Most birds can talk, or mimic the sounds of other creatures and things.
Birds are avian dinosaurs, so it leads me to believe that dinosaurs could talk too.
I bet they hid in the bushes and called the other animals to their toothy doom.
 

GetAgrippa

Diamond Member
It’s amazing how intelligent some birds are with what most had considered a more primitive reptilian-like brain - even more so intriguing is the intelligence of fish and then an octopus a dang mollusk. I don’t think we truly understand how intelligence emerges from any animals brain/or ganglia. Even lobsters and crayfish are fairly intelligent.
Humans on the other hand have the intelligence of a frog- no thst insults frogs maybe just above amoeba lol
 
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I watched a show on birds. There was a part about how smart crows are. One of the examples was an intersection where the crows had actually learned traffic patterns and the lights and knew when it was safe to go into the road to get food. Impressive to say the least.
Crows and ravens remember people and are extremely smart problem solvers.






Animals ( like kids) in general are smarter than we Give them credit for .

About 10 years ago while fishing an Adirondack lake a friend and I realized the smallmouths were feeding on crayfish. On our trip the following year we brought snorkeling gear and while collecting crawfish under rocks for bait in 6-10 feet of water , we found ourselves being visited by smallmouths hovering around the rocks we’d be turning over for a free meal . We’d lose between 25-40 percent of the crayfish as they’d dart in fast right in front of our hands to grab them . We were each able to actually hand feed a smallmouth each while snorkeling near the bottom . Was pretty freaking cool !
 
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GetAgrippa

Diamond Member
Man when I was in high school they would have these Raccoon meets which I guess they used CB radios to tell everyone which farm pond usually right beside a highway. I only went to a couple. It was crazy-one thing was put a raccoon in a cage on this trolley that would hover over the water of pond and a pack of dogs would swim after it-which dog fastest, then they had a dog treeing contest which wasn't much harm to raccoon. Well the last event was they put a raccoon in barrel. I was thinking damn poor raccoons don't stand a chance. Then they would set two dogs to fetch it out. I was expecting a carnage but suddenly yelping and dogs all ripped to hell. I couldn't believe it. Every time even if the dogs did manage to get the poor thing out they were still all ripped to hell bleeding everywhere. Raccoons seemed fine- I always wondered what they did with the raccoons. I had no idea they could be so vicious-since generally seem docile and generally scared of people.
 

GetAgrippa

Diamond Member
Dog treeing a raccoon the fastest -but it was actually a pole. They called it Dog treeing which makes perfect sense LOL
 
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