Musical heirlooms

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
There are certain pieces of gear I own that once I pass, they will go specific individuals. Nearly all of them are pieces that I use, with a few exceptions. For example: I have a guitar that I sold to a friend, who sold it to another mutual friend, then was owned by other friends, and finally made its way back to me. It's earmarked to go to a specific friend in the previous chain of ownership.

I've also noted (in my will) that specific cymbals, snares, and drum sets, will go to specific people w/ notes and info as to why to me, it's important they receive the specific piece.

I kick myself for at the age of 13, selling off the 60s sunburst bass guitar my dad had given me. It was his as a teen and I just wanted to play drums. My hope is that those who get some of my stuff will eventually pass them along to their heirs/beneficiaries.

And to be clear: some gear I own merely serves a purpose right now and I don't exactly think I'll keep some of it forever (til death).

Edited to add: So how about it? Do you have pieces of gear you've inherited or plan to pass along?
 
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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I have great respect for your wishes and instructions in this context, but I harbor no such designs myself. I don't retain equipment unless I'm using it. When I'm ready for a new set of cymbals, all my current cymbals go bye-bye. The same is true for drums and hardware. I'm completely utilitarian in the gear column. It's my ability to drum, intrinsic only to myself, that I cherish like the Holy Grail. Upon my expiration, it will retire with me. Perhaps I'll be able transfer that capacity to some other realm, but the specifics of that proposition remain unknown. In the meantime, I'll drum until nature determines otherwise.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I want to be cremated and sealed in a drum with enough room for my wife. That's the only piece of musical equipment I care about surviving after I expire.

I look at it like this. I have my own stuff. I dont want my parents stuff, its theirs. And I doubt my kid wants my stuff. She has her own stuff and plays no music.
 
I suppose it'll all depend on if my kids decide to play drums or not. Currently my son is 3 and he likes to bang around on them occasionally, so hopefully that'll turn into something. If so, I'd like for him to use some of the gear I have acquired if he wishes and eventually keep it down the line. If not him, maybe the next kid will. I guess it'll also depend on how long I live because it could all potentially be pretty useless come then. I think I have some sweet stuff though, so I hope they keep it haha.

I think about this now with my Dad as well. He's only in his early 60's so I'm hoping he sticks around for a long while still, but I'd probably keep his cymbals and hardware and sell his Catalina Maple kits as they aren't all that special.
 

DrummerJustLikeDad

Active member
Despite my screen name, my dad’s real instrument was the piano. He taught piano lessons, played Chopin vigorously and Debussy beautifully, and for years played the pipe organ at his church. For all that, when I once asked his favorite piano music of all, his answered tickled me. “Scott Joplin’s ragtime.” Did I mention he conducted school band early in his career.

By the age of 13, both his parents were suddenly gone, and he was taken into the home of an older, childless couple who owned their own dairy farm. To us, these were our grandparents. Their farmhouse always seemed simple and spartan, just as it had been during the depression when they had welcomed my orphaned father into their home. To us, it was simply accepted that a baby grand piano sat in their parlor where it had apparently been for decades.

It was only after my father was gone that we finally pieced together what a bold gesture of extravagance this had been from this pennywise couple trying to survive the 1930s. That piano was their way of saying, “We've heard you’ve had a pretty tough life, and we’ve also heard you like to play. Please let this be your home now.”

Today my father’s boyhood piano sits, pride of place, in our own living room. I don’t begin to play like he did, but I do sit down to it every single day.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
As far as heirlooms I have are the bass drum, snare and hats that were my Dad's when he was a kid in the 1940's. The only person these things have meaning to are me. They will be hopefully be disposed of in the manner I have in the legal docs.

For my drum stuff...after discussions with my wife.. My legal docs upon the time of my death does list my gear in general and my wishes for disposal. My child gets first choice. The remaining will be donated to a local music college. No hassles of selling for the people left behind. I keep an up-to-date list with what I have and where to find it. I even update approx. street value for each item every couple of years.

For me, the goal is to remove much of the gear from the equation as possible to avoid extra work for those who have to do the work. If my child doesn't have any attachment in terms of 'heirloom'.. No one else will care.

After riding the G.A.S. wave to the top for a couple of years, I decided what I really want to keep for the remainder of my playing years. The rest of it has been almost 100% sold off at this point. Every time I think I am done selling, I look at something and ask why I am keeping it.

Once again, I think I am there so hopefully by the end of this year, it will be 100% done and will be at the bottom of the G.A.S. wave.

At the end of the day, it's just stuff.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
After my parents (divorced) passed, I was left with their clothes, books, boxes of papers and photos. My father’s clothes went to a Veteran’s charity, my mother’s cashmere sweaters went to her sister. The only books I kept were their high school yearbooks. The only papers I kept were the armed services records of my dad (he was captured by the Nazi at the Battle of the Bulge) and poetry my mother had written. I kept all the photos, which tell me the story of their lives. Furniture? There was one table my uncle built for my mother that I ate at for years, but my mother’s widower really needed it, so it’s with him.

When I die, it’s important for my spawn to get all the photos of my life and of their ancestors, and all the music I’ve recorded. If there’s a musical instrument they want, it’s theirs. Otherwise, it’s a burden. And I’m not into burdens.

Exhibit A: my maternal grandfather, a colonel In radio communications (foreground, looking away from camera) with one of his squads of Navajo Code Talkers, at a South Pacific island. He maintained his connections with them long after the war via HAM radio.

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Super Phil

Senior Member
I own a lot of stuff (guitars and drums) and there will definitely be certain instruments going to certain people for different reasons.
 

roncadillac

Member
I don't have anyone to pass anything too unfortunately. If I ever have a kid I'm going to be one of those parents who forces them to play piano so they'll probably hate any memory of instruments in relation to me haha.

On the other hand, right before my wedding I was given my great grandfather's cufflinks that he wore while drumming in swing and big bands back in the 40's touring the North Eastern USA. Those are extremely special to me.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I have some really cool gear, but maybe one of my kids shows a vague interest in music at best. Mostly, they really don't care. I'm sure all of my stuff will go to my wife, and then to my kids. I told her to feel free to build a shrine of me, donate it all to a local church, give it away, keep it in storage with the thought that maybe grand kids would care, sell it, or whatever. I don't care. I'm one of those "The earth is not my home" sorts of people, so I have nothing I remotely want family members to hang onto. They are free to do whatever with it. It won't hurt my feelings.
 

roncadillac

Member
I have some really cool gear, but maybe one of my kids shows a vague interest in music at best. Mostly, they really don't care. I'm sure all of my stuff will go to my wife, and then to my kids. I told her to feel free to build a shrine of me, donate it all to a local church, give it away, keep it in storage with the thought that maybe grand kids would care, sell it, or whatever. I don't care. I'm one of those "The earth is not my home" sorts of people, so I have nothing I remotely want family members to hang onto. They are free to do whatever with it. It won't hurt my feelings.
Well said, couldn't agree more.
 
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