Music that Improves your senses.

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
This is sort of an aesthetics question. I've been doing photography, something that I do is calibrate my lenses. I use a big black and white chart. The chart has all of these edges.

I found that I kind of like looking at the chart, and seeing how far away I can stand and resolve the edges. I was thinking there must be some art like this. Then this week I was in Santa Fe, and there it was Acoma pottery. Interestingly enough they have been doing this for hundreds of years.



Anyway, I wonder if there is any music out there that is especially good for improving auditory acuity, maybe perception of time or tone.

I find that in general the Acoma pottery works really well with other forms of art.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Very interesting thoughts !

I think that learning to listen to a full orchestra and listen to each individual instrument is the best way to train you ears and mind. When I was young my father taught me how to listen to music. He would have me pick out each instrument in a song. For instance if the band was a four piece band he would have me listen to the song and only concentrate on the bass player for the whole song. Then listen to the whole song again and only concentrate on the piano. And so on for each instrument. Then listen one more time and hear how all of the instruments melded together to create the song. After a while I could do this exercise with a full orchestra.

Doing this allowed me to learn to love and appreciate music. And it helped me immensely in becoming a musician. Now it is very easy for me to do things like listen for vocal ques when I'm playing with a band. Or pick out the drum part in a song so that I can learn it.


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SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Very interesting thoughts !

I think that learning to listen to a full orchestra and listen to each individual instrument is the best way to train you ears and mind. When I was young my father taught me how to listen to music. He would have me pick out each instrument in a song. For instance if the band was a four piece band he would have me listen to the song and only concentrate on the bass player for the whole song. Then listen to the whole song again and only concentrate on the piano. And so on for each instrument. Then listen one more time and hear how all of the instruments melded together to create the song. After a while I could do this exercise with a full orchestra.

Doing this allowed me to learn to love and appreciate music. And it helped me immensely in becoming a musician. Now it is very easy for me to do things like listen for vocal ques when I'm playing with a band. Or pick out the drum part in a song so that I can learn it.


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I once read that the Native Americans were more into continuity, and that many of there songs had slowly descending melodies. Makes me wonder if there isn't some relationship between the slowly converging lines in the pottery, and the gradual melodic approaches.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I'd say the music that plants grow well to may qualify.

Mozart and his ilk.

I wonder if plants would grow good to Motown. Hmmm.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
It's more a way of listening than the actual music. I'd be looking for anything I'm not overly familiar with, that uses the full sonic possibilities of the ensemble, and/or that is narrowly focused on one thing. I'd be thinking Bach, Mahler, Debussy, Strauss, Cage, Reich, Xenakis, Pygmy music, any folkloric African (or African diaspora) music.

Also get the Paul Klee notebooks, which are available free on line. Not music, but related.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
It's more a way of listening than the actual music. I'd be looking for anything I'm not overly familiar with, that uses the full sonic possibilities of the ensemble, and/or that is narrowly focused on one thing. I'd be thinking Bach, Mahler, Debussy, Strauss, Cage, Reich, Xenakis, Pygmy music, any folkloric African (or African diaspora) music.

Also get the Paul Klee notebooks, which are available free on line. Not music, but related.
It probably does have something to do with the way one listens(or participates), but having the right material with which to listen would help. I think anything that splits hairs, would do :)

Maybe those tail gating trombones, with their doo tonguing. I know there is some freaking precise stand up bass out there. Maybe Charles Mingus.
 
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