Music that doesn't stand the test of time for you

petrez

Senior Member
System Of A Down. Loved the originality of them, up until the mid-2000's. Now I just get really tired of listening to it, and this coming from a guy that love thrash metal above all else.

Dream Theater. A lot of the same reasons as mentioned Loved them in the early to mid-2000's, went to some concerts, learned to play A Change Of Seasons front to back. I kind of lost them after discovering even more "edgy" progressive metal, namely Opeth, and also getting more into the thrash bands of the 80's. Suddenly DT sounded way too clean and polished for me, incredible musicians no doubt, but it sounds very sterile, too calculated, if you will.
 
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Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
@petrez completely with you on Opeth. They're a fairly recent discovery for me. The only thing that's dated is the production on their first few albums, which were obviously recorded on a budget. I love 'Morningrise' and 'My Arms, Your Hearse' in particular. If they had been released a week ago with slightly better production, they would still stand up-to-date. 'Blackwater Park' is obviously a masterpiece.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
System Of A Down. Loved the originality of them, up until the mid-2000's. Now I just get really tired of listening to it, and this coming from a guy that love thrash metal above all else.

Dream Theater. A lot of the same reasons as mentioned Loved them in the early to mid-2000's, went to some concerts, learned to play A Change Of Seasons front to back. I kind of lost them after discovering even more "edgy" progressive metal, namely Opeth, and also getting more into the thrash bands of the 80's. Suddenly DT sounded way too clean and polished for me, incredible musicians no doubt, but it sounds very sterile, too calculated, if you will.

the other thing getting in my way of really latching on to Dream Theater was:

Fates Warning

they are my bellwether for prog metal, and not many touch them in my eyes.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
Cool, I'm going to check out FW, don't think I've heard of them before. 🤔

start with Awaken The Guardian - it is a pioneering album in prog metal; came out in 85 alongside Queensryche's The Warning and the first Watchtower album

then do Inside Out <--- my personal fave

then do Perfect Symmetry

then do Theories of Flight to get a taste o recent stuff

pretty much every prog metal band owes their sound to (early) Queensrychhe, Maiden, Watchtower, Fates Warning, Pink Floyd, Rush and Budgie in mmy eyes
 

pgm554

Platinum Member
I used to love Rick Wakeman’s first two solo albums. Played them about 10 years ago and turned each off within minutes. Tons of respect for the guy but no thx unless he’s with Yes.
Which ones?
I thought Criminal Record was cool.
 

iCe

Silver Member
System Of A Down. Loved the originality of them, up until the mid-2000's. Now I just get really tired of listening to it, and this coming from a guy that love thrash metal above all else.

Dream Theater. A lot of the same reasons as mentioned Loved them in the early to mid-2000's, went to some concerts, learned to play A Change Of Seasons front to back. I kind of lost them after discovering even more "edgy" progressive metal, namely Opeth, and also getting more into the thrash bands of the 80's. Suddenly DT sounded way too clean and polished for me, incredible musicians no doubt, but it sounds very sterile, too calculated, if you will.
@petrez completely with you on Opeth. They're a fairly recent discovery for me. The only thing that's dated is the production on their first few albums, which were obviously recorded on a budget. I love 'Morningrise' and 'My Arms, Your Hearse' in particular. If they had been released a week ago with slightly better production, they would still stand up-to-date. 'Blackwater Park' is obviously a masterpiece.

Reading this i need to check out the early work of Opeth too. I have 'Deliverance' on cd and the track with the same name is just pure gold. Also really like The Lotus Eater.
Having said that, Mikael Akerfeldt is hilarious!

 

petrez

Senior Member
Yeah, Deliverance is probably my favorite song from them, that last piece with the weird rythmic part really caught me off guard back then, had to listen to it over and over. I also covered that track with some friends when I went to music class in 2007, had it for my final exam actually. I remember the rest of the pop/country heads in my class was blown to pieces after that performance :LOL: . Jaws literally on the floor. I didn't feel I nailed it perfectly back then, but at least it was something else compared to what the others where doing that day...

Mikael is a really funny dude, I saw a clip of him eating a Big Mac in-between songs, somebody in the audience threw one up on stage when he said he was hungry earlier on. That's when you know you own the audience and pretty much get away with anything :LOL:
 

JimmyM

Platinum Member
Which ones?
I thought Criminal Record was cool.
Six Wives of Henry VIII and Journey to the Center of the Earth. I also bought the King Arthur album but hated most of it back then, too ;)
 

iCe

Silver Member
Mikael is a really funny dude, I saw a clip of him eating a Big Mac in-between songs, somebody in the audience threw one up on stage when he said he was hungry earlier on.

Funny that you mention that, because i was looking for a clip and came across that one too hahaha
Some friends and me wanted to do the outro of Deliverance too, but never got around too it. But it is one of the most epic outros of all time IMO. When it comes on in the car the volume always goes up to 11.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Portnoy moving on was the final nail in the coffin for me but even the couple albums leading up to that point you sensed they were getting redundant and repetitive and running out of creative juice. Jordan Rudess is an insanely talented musician but I feel he pushed them too far into endless crazy solos/odd times and they lost the ability to write solid melodies.
100% agree. I really think the decision to add Jordan ruined the band.

I actually liked Falling Into Finity. But unlike most DT fans who think Scenes from Memory was the band's pinnacle of greatness, I thought it was awful. I really did like Train of Thought and Ocatavarium at the time. After that, ugh. Systematic Chaos should have been called Systematic Crap. Black Clouds contained no Silver Linings.

I tried again with Mangini and did go see them with Mangini (He's amazing live). But musically, forget it. They had long stopped writing songs.


I remember the discussions that we had about Dream Theater when you were a fairly new member! I think you were still very much a fan back then. Personally I've never been particularly enamoured.

As a teenager, I really liked Rush. Then one day I just stopped liking them. Probably around the same time I really got into King Crimson - who I still love.
The weird thing is:

OK I've had a falling out with a band before. I stopped listening to U2 after Rattle and Hum. I have zero interest in their albums after that. I saw them on the Zoo tour (I got a free ticket) and they were awful. But I still worship those 1st 4 albums. and I like the 5th one. I've never stopped being a fan of their early work.

Queensryche, love, love their early albums, nothing passed Promise Land is worth buying. I've tried, but eventually, I just stopped buying their albums and going to shows. But I never stopped enjoying the albums I originally loved.

Rush, OK, I thought their final 3 albums or so were pretty forgettable. But I still love the band as a whole.

With Dream Theater, I didn't just stop listening to their new stuff, I stopped listening to the past albums I had originally liked. I fell out of love with most of their entire catalog. There are a few songs that I still sort of enjoy here and there, but I have no desire to listen to most of the albums I used to like.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I'm going to go for it and say that Rush's 'Power Windows' has aged horribly. At least in terms of production.
Part of me thinks them is fighting words! I love that album! And I think it contains two songs in particular that are among Rush's better songs;
"Emotional Detector" and "Middle Town Dreams".

But alas, I have to agree the production is the equivalent of pastel parachute pants. Everything is drenched in so much 80's reverb, the production stands out like a sore thumb.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I'm finding that as I get older I'm liking more extreme metal than I did as a teenager. Funny really, always liked metal but couldn't stand growls. Love them now...
It took until my mid-40s.

I still don't love them, but I don't turn them off, and admit they are part of some of my favorite bands now.

I dunno, most bands mellow as they age. I figured I'd mellow with too. Nope, now I'm into way more heavier bands than I would even consider listening to 20-30 years ago.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
100% agree. I really think the decision to add Jordan ruined the band.

I actually liked Falling Into Finity. But unlike most DT fans who think Scenes from Memory was the band's pinnacle of greatness, I thought it was awful. I really did like Train of Thought and Ocatavarium at the time. After that, ugh. Systematic Chaos should have been called Systematic Crap. Black Clouds contained no Silver Linings.

I tried again with Mangini and did go see them with Mangini (He's amazing live). But musically, forget it. They had long stopped writing songs.

same re Falling Into Infinity and Scenes From A Memory. I think SFAM was the end for me. It just meandered.

The weird thing is:

OK I've had a falling out with a band before. I stopped listening to U2 after Rattle and Hum. I have zero interest in their albums after that. I saw them on the Zoo tour (I got a free ticket) and they were awful. But I still worship those 1st 4 albums. and I like the 5th one. I've never stopped being a fan of their early work.

this is the same with Metallica for me. After the Black album, I was out. I could not ame a song off of fany album after the Black album

Queensryche, love, love their early albums, nothing passed Promise Land is worth buying. I've tried, but eventually, I just stopped buying their albums and going to shows. But I never stopped enjoying the albums I originally loved.

dude....are you my long lost twin?

Rush, OK, I thought their final 3 albums or so were pretty forgettable. But I still love the band as a whole.

I only agree about Snakes and Arrows. I just can't get into that album. Other than that, Rush can do no wrong in my life
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
Part of me thinks them is fighting words! I love that album! And I think it contains two songs in particular that are among Rush's better songs;
"Emotional Detector" and "Middle Town Dreams".

dude.seriously....you are my twin. The run of Middletown Dreams to Emotion Detector to Mystic Rhythms is one of my all time favorite things to play drums and bass to. All just brilliant. And I will still posit that the wole album is Geddy's best bass playing

But alas, I have to agree the production is the equivalent of pastel parachute pants. Everything is drenched in so much 80's reverb, the production stands out like a sore thumb.

the production does not bother me b/c it is what was first imprinted on my brain, ,and fits the era. I don't think I could hear those songs produced any diferent
 

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
@DrumEatDrum I remember liking a couple of Dream Theater songs as a teenager but by the time I heard them, they had already given up songwriting for showing off (the 'Rudess Problem'). 'The Dance of Eternity' is - being honest - not a song, it's a bunch of people showing off. It has no direction, no coherence and the whole thing just sounds like a bunch of keyboards and drums falling down the stairs. And I say that as a massive fan of Merzbow (who I have seen live).

I think I just 'missed' the early albums because that was my impression of Dream Theater early on. After that I had no interest. 'Under a Glass Moon'? Fine. But just fine - but it's all too clean and precise.

My minor obsession with King Crimson (who can also sound like they're falling down the stairs) is that there's aggression and risk to it. Even with the studio albums you feel like it might all come apart at the seams at any time. I love that. And every album is different and sometimes, it's just a different band. I never got that feeling with Dream Theater. Other than indulging their worst tendencies for the last 20-odd years, I don't see any growth at all.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
same re Falling Into Infinity and Scenes From A Memory. I think SFAM was the end for me. It just meandered.
Agreed. And I should have gotten off the bandwagon then, but I was in denial. I really did like the songs on Train of Thought, but I think the album would have been better if they had cut out the long meandering solos in the middle of every song. Also, they started just repeating themselves.

When Kevin Moore left the band, he criticized where he thought the band was going. And although it took another album, in the end, he was right. It became too easy for the band just to just write stuff for the sake of being complicated and forget the harder part of writing songs that were memorable.

this is the same with Metallica for me. After the Black album, I was out. I could not ame a song off of fany album after the Black album
Agreed. I bought Load, I can't tell you a song on it. I stupidly bought St Anger. I am still waiting for my money back.

dude.seriously....you are my twin.
haha....maybe. We seem to have similar opinions on a lot of bands. lol

@DrumEatDrum I remember liking a couple of Dream Theater songs as a teenager but by the time I heard them, they had already given up songwriting for showing off (the 'Rudess Problem'). 'The Dance of Eternity' is - being honest - not a song, it's a bunch of people showing off.
You're quite right.

and the whole thing just sounds like a bunch of keyboards and drums falling down the stairs

"insert me rolling on the floor laughing". Yeah, that is an accurate description.

The odd thing is I still love Fated Warning, a band I would have never gotten into if not for Dream Theater.
But Fates Warning never stopped writing from the heart, and generally kept soloing to a minimum. But also, Fates Warning doesn't tour or put out albums on the scale of DT either. But they still indulge in odd times, complex syncopation, and such.
 

Mediocrefunkybeat

Platinum Member
To me it's whether or not the band has anything to say. Other than 'look at how much complex stuff we can cram in'. Even virtuosity can have some depth, though.

As I've said countless times before (and even in this thread) I'm a massive King Crimson fan. Fripp is my favourite guitarist, bar none. He wrote 'Fracture' as an exercise to see if he could play it. The difference is that (when he played it in standard tuning) he failed sometimes. It fell apart live on stage. It was always a risk and Fripp has said that it's 'impossible' to play - i.e. impossible for him to play perfectly. Other than the guitar part, the rest of it quite loose and the band have creative input around the central part. Sure, it's Fripp writing something difficult for the sake of it but it's not him showing off, it's him taking a risk and flying by the seat of his pants every single night, hoping it's going to stay together. It's an exciting, wild ride.

It's a completely different era to Dream Theater and the two aren't really directly comparable but I've never watched a live performance of Dream Theater and got that sense of excitement and risk. Just clinical perfection - which isn't what I'm interested in. Unless you're James DeBrie and struggling to stay in tune, in which case it can fall apart any second but not in an exciting way...

Even the versions of Fracture that have been released commercially aren't perfect. The original recording was a mostly-live one and there are definitely bum notes in there. I like that. It shows humanity.
 
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