MOST UNIQUE CUSTOM SNARE EVER!!

axisT6

Senior Member
...in my opinion anyway! LOL.

Here is an experiment that turned out awesome. The top shell was made from Schedule 40 Stainless Steel industrial pipe (3/8” thick). The wood insert is a ½” thick bubinga stave piece. All of this is fitted into a Pearl Free Floating Chassis. This drum is a little over 8 inches deep, and sort of borrows from the design of DW Edge snares, but there is a slight twist. The bubinga shell protrudes into the stainless shell a bit, providing a register fit. The fit itself is an INTERFERENCE FIT. What this means is that the OD of the portion of the bubinga shell that fits inside the stainless shell is slightly larger than the ID of the stainless shell. To fit them together, the stainless shell needed to be heated up a little bit, and dead blow hammer was used to carefully finish the assembly. This tight fit reinforces the stave shell just like the metal bands do on the actual stave barrels, and when you strike the shell, both pieces resonate in unity, making a very unique sound. This is my new favorite snare at the moment.

Cool story. The drummer for the “The Devil Wears Prada” saw this drum on IG and loved it. He ended up taking it on a recent tour!


 

barryabko

Senior Member
Wow - very unique! How is the upper bearing edge accomplished? Is the polished thin metal between the SS and bubinga shells a band? How is it held in place? Does it have a joint and if so, how is it tightened?
 

cutaway79

Silver Member
Wow - very unique! How is the upper bearing edge accomplished? Is the polished thin metal between the SS and bubinga shells a band? How is it held in place? Does it have a joint and if so, how is it tightened?
I think the whole top section is one polished SS piece with a strip of wrap or metal around its center. That's what it looks like to me anyway. Seems that the top of the bubinga shell is slightly smaller in diameter, and pressure fitted into the bottom of the SS shell section. At least, that's my understanding of it.
 

axisT6

Senior Member
Wow - very unique! How is the upper bearing edge accomplished? Is the polished thin metal between the SS and bubinga shells a band? How is it held in place? Does it have a joint and if so, how is it tightened?
The joint is a register fit. There are no bands. The top piece is solid stainless. Here is a quick picture of the fit:




The batter bearing edge is a rounded single 45.
 

SYMBOLIC DEATH

Senior Member
I really like the looks of your snare. I remember the one that you did with just the pipe, which got me looking into having one made for my Pearl ff.
What are the two polished areas above and below the "brushed" area of the steel shell. Did you machine those polished areas into the shell?
What would you charge for a shell insert to make a 5.5 free floater?
 

axisT6

Senior Member
I really like the looks of your snare. I remember the one that you did with just the pipe, which got me looking into having one made for my Pearl ff.
What are the two polished areas above and below the "brushed" area of the steel shell. Did you machine those polished areas into the shell?
What would you charge for a shell insert to make a 5.5 free floater?
Schedule 40 pipe is 14” OD. For the shell shown, I needed to have one end turned down to 13-7/8” for the head, and the other end turned down to 13-15/16” to fit snug in the free floating chassis. The Machinist hit the unmachined diameter with a grinder while it was still in the lathe. That is why it has that cool looking swirl look. I am really not the one to go through to get a shell made as this was kind of a one-off deal for me.
 
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