More evidence that drumming is good for your brain

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
So I have a mild disability regarding recognizing people by their face, or differentiating similar objects in a group. Normally I can barely tell people apart if they look similar at all, unless I know them really well.

However, drumming makes this magically go away. I heard Dennis Chambers say that people mix up him and Carter Beauford all the time. I don’t even think they look alike, and can very easily tell them apart. If they weren’t drummers, I would almost certainly mix them up too.

Anybody else experience this?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
So I have a mild disability regarding recognizing people by their face, or differentiating similar objects in a group. Normally I can barely tell people apart if they look similar at all, unless I know them really well.

However, drumming makes this magically go away. I heard Dennis Chambers say that people mix up him and Carter Beauford all the time. I don’t even think they look alike, and can very easily tell them apart. If they weren’t drummers, I would almost certainly mix them up too.

Anybody else experience this?
I think I'm opposite. Everyone looks familiar to me. I'm constantly asking my wife "isn't that so and so?". It usually isn't, just someone who looks like them.

Do you have eye contact issues? I do, and I think that might be why. Dont quite take in all the details or something when looking at people.

Drummers, and people in photos are different. I can absolutely recognize folks whose picture I can study. It's the whole in person thing that gets me.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I think I'm opposite. Everyone looks familiar to me. I'm constantly asking my wife "isn't that so and so?". It usually isn't, just someone who looks like them.

Do you have eye contact issues? I do, and I think that might be why. Dont quite take in all the details or something when looking at people.

Drummers, and people in photos are different. I can absolutely recognize folks whose picture I can study. It's the whole in person thing that gets me.
I think sometimes I avoid looking at people for fear of provoking them. That might be part of it. Plus, most people kind of bore me. I mostly ignore most people. That’s definitely part of it too.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I’m visual to so faces I recognize but names forget about it. What's odd though when I converse with people I often avoid eye contact and look off. It generally drives people crazy thinking I'm rude and not interested but actually I am and listening. Use to drive my Profs crazy asking me was I listening to them-which I was just thinking about what they were saying. When I look at people I get distracted from what they are saying noticing things about their face.
Actually there are neuroscientist who don’t recognize dyslexia nor a bunch of learning difficulties. Not that it isn’t a measureable difference (hypoactivation of some pathways, hyperactivation of other, difference in parietal lobes, thalamus, and cerebellum) but a third of everyone has cognitive, anatomical, and neurophysiological differences and most go unrecognized. So what do the differences really mean. Just normal biological variances is the idea -just standards of education are for the majority in a standard curve-so some ahead of curve and some behind=those behind labeled a problem. You should actually expect such variance in a biological population.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I think sometimes I avoid looking at people for fear of provoking them. That might be part of it. Plus, most people kind of bore me. I mostly ignore most people. That’s definitely part of it too.
I look at their mouth when talking. Like I hear the words and see them so I can take in what they are saying. If I look into their eyes, I get so caught up in making sure I maintain eye contact that I lose focus on the conversation. I feel rude about it sometimes, but I dont know if one can tell I'm looking at their mouth and not their eyes.

My kid is high functioning autistic. Anyone she doesnt know she wont look at when talking. She stares at the floor. She likes talking to people though, its weird.

curve-so some ahead of curve and some behind=those behind labeled a problem.
Art, do you think the ones ahead of the curve are the ones who label those behind a problem? Or is it the median group that decides?
 

Yamaha Rider

Well-known member
I think I'm opposite. Everyone looks familiar to me. I'm constantly asking my wife "isn't that so and so?". It usually isn't, just someone who looks like them.

Do you have eye contact issues? I do, and I think that might be why. Dont quite take in all the details or something when looking at people.

Drummers, and people in photos are different. I can absolutely recognize folks whose picture I can study. It's the whole in person thing that gets me.
I don't mind initial eye contact - but as a conversation goes on I find it more and more disconcerting and stressful. People generally find me distant and hard to engage with for more than short periods. Some level of autism I've been told. I'm sure I compensate through music as an alternative form of communication.
Hey how about a new thread - Does anyone NOT have personality 'issues' - and don't you feel left out?
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Drumming is unique in its incorporation of both hemispheres of the brain. It equally engages the logical and creative machinery at once. This ignites a cognitive synergy that grants drummers enhanced powers of analysis and insight. If you think you're the smartest person you've ever met, it's probably because you're a drummer.
 
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Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Drumming is unique in its incorporation of both hemispheres of the brain. It equally engages the logical and creative machinery at once. This ignites a cognitive synergy that grants drummers enhanced powers of analysis and insight. If you think you're the smartest person you've ever met, it's probably because your a drummer.
I’ve been drumming and singing simultaneously for about 6 months with my little band that I started. We’re on hold now due to the lockdown, but I have found that it definitely adds another level of difficulty.

It’s actually not hard to sing in time with the drums. It’s harder to sing a very different rhythm than what you’re playing, but it just takes practice. The REALLY hard thing is to play on the beat while singing BEHIND the beat, like Sinatra loved to do so much. It’s not too bad if you’re just playing a simple money beat with just the hands, but trying to add in the feet, ESPECIALLY if the kick is doing anything complex,,,,WOW.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Funny my neighbors comment on my music and drumming-they seem to enjoy it. Lately I've been singing along and drumming, and just the other day saw one my neighbors and her daughter and we were talking about my moving and they told me they'd miss my music (as well as just being a good neighbor -I cleaned out behind our houses so we have a great view of woods now-the developers left a shit hole) LOL. Her daughter sheepishly asked do I ever sing while drumming-and I had to admit yes but don't shoot me for it I just get carried away with a song sometimes. Pretty funny-reminds me of my daughters when they were growing up when I'd break out in song-'NO DADDY-NO DADDY!!!!" LOL. I don't think I could drum and sing every song but some songs are like peas and carrots.
 
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