Moeller Technique ?

MDslammer

Member
Dug out my Jim Chapin video and was watching him demo the Moeller Tech
as well as viewing the video's here.

I get the individual strokes with 3 beats per hand and can do them pretty well. Then I watch him do the triplets using this technique and he gets them blazing... Is he still utilizing the Moeller technique when he gets up to this speed or?

I get to a medium tempo on the triplet's then the wheels come off....

Other than hours of needed repetition/practice for this technique, is there
something I'm overlooking or not doing for the triplet exercise? Something I should be aware of that I'm missing.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

MDslammer
 

cornelius

Silver Member
If you haven’t done this already, back up a step and 1.) Check your grip 2.) Master the Freestroke.

Check out Jim’s grip - index finger extended... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yNb-kUPwMI
Moeller relies on rebound and letting the sticks do the work. With the Freestroke, you’ll develop the ability to allow the sticks to easily come back so you can get that Moeller pumping motion to work for you.
 

MDslammer

Member
Cornelius,

Thanks for taking time to reply. I will check out the link and
review my grip. Good advice.

Regards.

MDslammer
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I studied Moeller Technique under Malcolm Garrett who is arguably the best drum teacher in Britain and one of the most humble guys I've ever met for how talented he is. I was also lucky enough to have a one to one lesson with Jim Chapin himself in 2004 which was one of the most intense 3 hours of my life.

It's hard to explain the secret to it as it takes years to master it. The biggest problem I had was volume control as the physics of Moller relies on everything being loose to get 'the whip'. Once you get the whip you'll find your playing becomes a whole lot louder with a lot less effort, and the same goes for speed because a paradiddle will feel like two strokes, triplet one stroke.

Stick grip again takes lot of practice to master as you don't grip the stick you control it with your fingers. Word of advice to anybody doing Moeller, do not use Zildjian Dip Sticks or anything with grips on it as they will destroy your hands with blisters as Moeller relies on the stick being free and your hands being loose.

Joe Morello Master Studies goes hand in hand with Moeller Technique all you need with these is a practice pad and a pair of sticks. You'll know when you're doing it right because of the sound.

Unfortunately practice is the only way to master. If you've been playing your own technique for years as I did your muscle memory will subconsciously take you back to how your body feels comfortable doing it. Luckliy I had someone watching me and correcting my arms/hands/fingers when I made a mistake.
 

MDslammer

Member
Mikyok,

Good advice. I've been playing for over 50 years and I've got my rudiments
down pretty well and with that the muscle memory that accompanies them.

I have developed playing the single paradiddle (when playing at the fastest speed) with a stroke similar to the whipping motion. Probably fell into this accidentally years back without really analyzing it.

I will continue to work on the relaxed grip and the whipping motion. Consider yourself fortunate to have studied with not only Malcolm but the great Jim Chapin.


I studied Moeller Technique under Malcolm Garrett who is arguably the best drum teacher in Britain and one of the most humble guys I've ever met for how talented he is. I was also lucky enough to have a one to one lesson with Jim Chapin himself in 2004 which was one of the most intense 3 hours of my life.

It's hard to explain the secret to it as it takes years to master it. The biggest problem I had was volume control as the physics of Moller relies on everything being loose to get 'the whip'. Once you get the whip you'll find your playing becomes a whole lot louder with a lot less effort, and the same goes for speed because a paradiddle will feel like two strokes, triplet one stroke.

Stick grip again takes lot of practice to master as you don't grip the stick you control it with your fingers. Word of advice to anybody doing Moeller, do not use Zildjian Dip Sticks or anything with grips on it as they will destroy your hands with blisters as Moeller relies on the stick being free and your hands being loose.

Joe Morello Master Studies goes hand in hand with Moeller Technique all you need with these is a practice pad and a pair of sticks. You'll know when you're doing it right because of the sound.

Unfortunately practice is the only way to master. If you've been playing your own technique for years as I did your muscle memory will subconsciously take you back to how your body feels comfortable doing it. Luckliy I had someone watching me and correcting my arms/hands/fingers when I made a mistake.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Mikyok,

Good advice. I've been playing for over 50 years and I've got my rudiments
down pretty well and with that the muscle memory that accompanies them.

I have developed playing the single paradiddle (when playing at the fastest speed) with a stroke similar to the whipping motion. Probably fell into this accidentally years back without really analyzing it.

I will continue to work on the relaxed grip and the whipping motion. Consider yourself fortunate to have studied with not only Malcolm but the great Jim Chapin.

Thanks MDslammer, I got very, very lucky at university, I had a year under Carl Palmer's brother Steve and then Mal was the tutor for the following two years. Fortunately for me Mr Chapin was good friends with Mal and used to stay with him when he came to England.

I'm gutted I didn't get anything signed when I met him, I think I was still in shock at how amazing his hands were at 84. He rolled about 50 years off and put them on me!
 

MDslammer

Member
I tried this technique when I first bought Jim Chapins video years back.
I tried but flailed miserably so I gave up.

However, after the past few months trying to get the basic's of this stroke down, watching several good video's and the forum's help, I finally broke
the plateau a few days back.

By no means do I have this where it needs to be for speed, consistency and accuracy...However, I finally fell into the triplet exercise utilizing the Moeller stroke. It happened really without conscientiously thinking about it. I guess doing the mechanics over and over finally kicked in.

I have to tell you that I'm 62 years old and have been playing since I was ten. Rudiments were and always have been the bible to me so I'm used to playing them. But finding something new and productive after all these years is a wonderful feeling.

I guess what I'm trying to say is, "you can teach an old dog new tricks"...LOL.
I'd like to thank all of you who took time to chime in an offer your help. I really appreciate it guys.

Be well.

MDslammer
Las Vegas, NV
 

musiprofofficial

Junior Member
I put together this blog post after having studied with Jacob Kaye and Bruce Becker. Jacob studied under Jim Chapin and Bruce studied with both Chapin and mostly with Freddie Gruber. The following blog post contains exercises that have really helped me get a handle on the technique:


There are free videos and PDF's for your downloading pleasure.
Elijah
 
I was lucky enough to study under Malcolm Garrett for 5 years, just a lovely man. Jim Chapin visited us a couple of times. They both made it look effortless
 

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