Missing the crash

Magenta

Platinum Member
Not for the first time, I am astounded and impressed with my uncanny ability to avoid hitting my crash. Hell, it's not as if it isn't big enough, and I don't exactly have to get up and walk halfway across the room to play it.

How does it happen? Does my stick mysteriously dematerialise at the crucial moment? It drives me nuts and makes me feel like a pillock. Bah.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Happens to me for a while after rearranging my cymbals.

I would try repositioning the crash slightly further away during your practice time. Then after a couple of days move it back where you want it.
 
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Duck Tape

Platinum Member
It's possible you don't like it. You said it's big, maybe it's too loud and you would prefer something small and civilized, like a 16".
 

picodon

Silver Member
Not for the first time, I am astounded and impressed with my uncanny ability to avoid hitting my crash. Hell, it's not as if it isn't big enough, and I don't exactly have to get up and walk halfway across the room to play it.

How does it happen? Does my stick mysteriously dematerialise at the crucial moment? It drives me nuts and makes me feel like a pillock. Bah.
It's not that it's difficult to just hit the crash. It's difficult to do it at that particular moment at (i guess) the end of a fill. Something must mess up your brain. Does the fill get you overexcited? If you simplify the fill to the bare and boring minimim do you still miss the crash?
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Pffffttt....missing the crash is too binary my dear Madge. One either hits or does not hit the crash.

May I introduce my technique of the underhanded glancing blow, turning the crash cymbal into a sort of muted fender bender cymbal.
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
Try painting a bullseye on it.
Hmm. Perhaps putting a photo of somebody I don't like would do the trick.

It's possible you don't like it. You said it's big, maybe it's too loud and you would prefer something small and civilized, like a 16".
That's a good point. It doesn't apply in this instance, as I LOVE it, but if I didn't then it would certainly be something I'd consider.


It's not that it's difficult to just hit the crash. It's difficult to do it at that particular moment at (i guess) the end of a fill. Something must mess up your brain. Does the fill get you overexcited? If you simplify the fill to the bare and boring minimim do you still miss the crash?
Happens to me for a while after rearranging my cymbals.
I think you've both hit the cymbal on the bell, so to speak. It almost never happens at home. When I play out, either on my own kit or somebody else's, it does. Memory locks or no memory locks, I must position the cymbal slightly differently from where I'm used to it being, and fail to take account of it in the heat of the moment.

May I introduce my technique of the underhanded glancing blow, turning the crash cymbal into a sort of muted fender bender cymbal.
I dispute your claim as to prior ownership of this technique, one that I have been using for several years now and which has served me well!
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
There's a purely scientific answer to this problem, Madge. When you play out, you are working up quite a sweat, with attendant body heat. Faster than you might think, this body heat quickly works its way into the near side of the cymbal stands, causing them to literally lean away from you.

The answer, of course, is to have the bass player or guitarist stand directly in front of the cymbal stand, directing his body heat into the far side of the stand and equalizing its temperature.

These findings were confirmed by intense scientific scrutiny by the University of Maplewood, Thailand, in 2013 in a study titled "Cymbal Stand Deflection and Body Heat Radiation," by Behynd mi Traps and Plai D. Skyns.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
There's a purely scientific answer to this problem, Madge. When you play out, you are working up quite a sweat, with attendant body heat. Faster than you might think, this body heat quickly works its way into the near side of the cymbal stands, causing them to literally lean away from you.

The answer, of course, is to have the bass player or guitarist stand directly in front of the cymbal stand, directing his body heat into the far side of the stand and equalizing its temperature.

These findings were confirmed by intense scientific scrutiny by the University of Maplewood, Thailand, in 2013 in a study titled "Cymbal Stand Deflection and Body Heat Radiation," by Behynd mi Traps and Plai D. Skyns.

GeeDeeEmm
Haga, thanks - I knew it couldn't possibly be MY fault!
 

Seafroggys

Silver Member
I miss crashes too frequently to admit.

Then I usually smack it with the snare on the 2 and all is forgiven.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Good for driving, bad for drumming. Close your eyes and crash the cymbal with it not being there. Have someone observe where your stick naturally goes with your eyes closed and move the cymbal stand there. I don't know wtf I'm suggesting, don't listen to me.

Maybe tape a picture of someone you despise on the cymbal.

But you're mostly lollipops and rainbows and despise probably isn't in your vernacular.
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
I liken it too shooting an "air ball" in basketball. Sometimes I get lucky and catch the underside of the cymbal, and I play it off like I planned to do that all along.
 

Magenta

Platinum Member
Then I usually smack it with the snare on the 2 and all is forgiven.
That is the toppest tip in ages! Thank you!

Good for driving, bad for drumming. Close your eyes and crash the cymbal with it not being there. Have someone observe where your stick naturally goes with your eyes closed and move the cymbal stand there. I don't know wtf I'm suggesting, don't listen to me.
That's not a bad idea.

despise probably isn't in your vernacular.
I sometimes wonder if you even know me at all, Lar. One word: Shemp.

I liken it too shooting an "air ball" in basketball. Sometimes I get lucky and catch the underside of the cymbal, and I play it off like I planned to do that all along.
Yeah, I should try that. I suppose swearing is a bit of a giveaway, isn't it?
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I sometimes wonder if you even know me at all, Lar. One word: Shemp.
Well how well can you know a person after only a few hours of conversation. You're right, all I know is how friggin cute you are. Among other nice things. But I have no clue what lurks deep down in the places you don't show anyone.

Shemp....are you referring to the member here that goes by Shemp? Or are you referring to Moe and Curly's brother Shemp from The Three Stooges? (An American comedy troupe that did short films in the 40's and 50's)

I liked Shemp. About 98% of the time.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Sometimes, when listening to the (classic rock) radio in the car, I'll drum along in my head.

And (in my head) I go for the crash, and then realize the drummer on the track didn't.

And I realize I'm way too addicted to hitting the crash.

So maybe missing the crash is just being mature enough to realize you don't need to hit the dang thing all the time.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Sometimes, when listening to the (classic rock) radio in the car, I'll drum along in my head.

And (in my head) I go for the crash, and then realize the drummer on the track didn't.

And I realize I'm way too addicted to hitting the crash.

So maybe missing the crash is just being mature enough to realize you don't need to hit the dang thing all the time.
I know what you mean by being addicted to crashing. So many drummers crash on beat one at the end of a fill, that it's a nice thing to think of an alternative. A lot of times I crash on beat 4, and let the swell of the cymbals carry over into beat one. Sounds interesting that way. Or sometimes delaying the crash until beat 2 instead of beat 1. Nice change up in certain places where it shines.

Studio drum tracks....are different than a live drum tracks in my mind. Like I don't have a problem with a click on studio cuts. But live? Get the click the hell out of my earshot. What about backing tracks you ask? They don't belong on a live stage either IMO. This is just in my little idealistic world, not how it really is. But studio stuff can get away with less crashes a little better than a live drummer can. JMO. Sometimes leaving the crash out works great, other times it's better to crash playing live.

Two different approaches, performing and studio work.

That's why I like to record gigs and listen back. My goal is for the drums to blend in smoothly, and sound good just on the listening part of it, yet still retain the live presence vital to a good stage show if you were there watching it. It's a balance of controlled energy for the recording, and live energy for the "live" aspect of it. Fine line that works great if you can strike the balance.
 

Nancy_C

Senior Member
This is the best thread ever, and the funniest, and I thank you all, for I have found my people. After searching far and wide, at long last, I have found you.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Try thinking of the cymbal hit as not being over until you recover the stick.

Thinking of the hit as 'occurring' when you launch is a real formula for lots of problems...including missing the intended target.


...and repeatedly aim for a small portion of the cymbal(or drum)...its a great skill builder.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Sometimes, when listening to the (classic rock) radio in the car, I go for the crash.

And I realize I'm way too addicted to hitting the crash.

So maybe missing the crash is just being mature enough to realize you don't need to hit the dang thing all the time.
Fixed it for ya. It's a wonder insurance companies still insure you :p
 
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