Minor "Stick Control" Revision

haredrums

Silver Member
Hey Guys,

I wrote an article explaining what I think the first column of "Stick Control" should look like here:

http://haredrums.blogspot.com/2014/10/food-for-thought-minor-stick-control.html

Basically, I think the first column should include inverted double strokes. Has anyone already wrote about this? Do you guys agree/disagree?

I know that suggesting any changes to such an important book is sort of ridiculous, but I think that this minor change really makes a lot of sense. Anyways, let me know what you think.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Nice to see you around again Andrew. I agree with you all the way. Takes a lot of courage to suggest revisions on a classic. I like seeing that. It says a lot about you. But I cite the same reasons as you, the inverted paradiddle is just a great lick that has a lot of practical applications. It really flows too. I share your view that it is a basic, and highly useful rudiment, that belongs on the first page.

I can't believe you're writing about this because I was going through stick control just yesterday, (for the first time in a while) and realized that I was getting tripped up on the inverted paradiddles at higher tempos. So I focused on them for like an hour so they wouldn't trip me up anymore, and it's like my newest thing now. They sound different...cooler, than a regular paradiddle.

Your blog is always first class.
 

haredrums

Silver Member
Nice to see you around again Andrew. I agree with you all the way. Takes a lot of courage to suggest revisions on a classic. I like seeing that. It says a lot about you. But I cite the same reasons as you, the inverted paradiddle is just a great lick that has a lot of practical applications. It really flows too. I share your view that it is a basic, and highly useful rudiment, that belongs on the first page.

I can't believe you're writing about this because I was going through stick control just yesterday, (for the first time in a while) and realized that I was getting tripped up on the inverted paradiddles at higher tempos. So I focused on them for like an hour so they wouldn't trip me up anymore, and it's like my newest thing now. They sound different...cooler, than a regular paradiddle.

Your blog is always first class.
Larry! Thanks! Great to hear from you, sorry I haven't been around as much.

I honestly don't know if suggesting a revision of a classic is brave or if I am being super ridiculous/missing something obvious. I was hoping that I would have a positive response and that nobody would jump down my throat, and so far everyone has been cool. Thanks for checking it out.
 

vxla

Silver Member
Interesting article, thanks for posting. I can't really say I agree with updating Stick Control as, for me, I've never considered them incrementing in difficulty from #1-72. I prefer to play them in random orders and start students in various place, as well.
 
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cornelius

Silver Member
Thanks for posting that article - I’m a big fan of Stick Control. I see the point your making, I used to have a warm-up where I took my favorite lines from the first 3 pages, and would play the inverted doubles in the same place you suggest.

But, I don’t think there’s a reason to tweak Stick Control. Stone’s evolution of the sticking patterns on pages 5,6 and 7 makes a lot of sense just the way it is, and even makes it easy to memorize. I love the fact that the inverted doubles are hidden on the second page. It proves that the entire book should be studied. I don’t think the solution is to move up line 45 to position 4, but to have the student advance through the entire book.
 

haredrums

Silver Member
Thanks for posting that article - I’m a big fan of Stick Control. I see the point your making, I used to have a warm-up where I took my favorite lines from the first 3 pages, and would play the inverted doubles in the same place you suggest.

But, I don’t think there’s a reason to tweak Stick Control. Stone’s evolution of the sticking patterns on pages 5,6 and 7 makes a lot of sense just the way it is, and even makes it easy to memorize. I love the fact that the inverted doubles are hidden on the second page. It proves that the entire book should be studied. I don’t think the solution is to move up line 45 to position 4, but to have the student advance through the entire book.
Fair enough! Obviously the book has been working well for everyone, so need to mess with success.

Personally I like to have the inverted doubles in the first column so that I can put them in my warm up routine (the Dawson Singe Stroke exercise), but I see your point about going through the rest of the book.

One other cool possibility would be to do a Dawson style warmup exercise using a completely different column from later in the book. I might have to try that...
 

haredrums

Silver Member
Interesting article, thanks for posting. I can't really say I agree with updating Stick Control as, for me, I've never considered them incrementing in difficulty from #1-72. I prefer to play them in random orders and start students in various place, as well.
Thanks for checking the article out! Of course, changing anything about Stick Control is pretty dicey to say the least, I can't argue with you about that.

I wasn't really trying to say that the #1-72 increase in difficulty, only that the first column is by the nature of lists the top priority in the book. Also that in a way that first column represents the most fundamental (not necessarily the easiest) stickings. I certainly can't fault your approach, and if it works well for you than by all means don't change it! Putting the inverted doubles in between the regular doubles has been productive for me, so I thought I would give everyone else the suggestion.
 

cornelius

Silver Member
It’s mazing that even today, we’re still talking about this book... Isn’t it going to be the 80th anniversary next year?
 

DrumAddik

Member
I think it is a great suggestion. I usually practice those anyway and also feel its silly that they are not in the book.
 

JohnW

Silver Member
Hey Guys,

I wrote an article explaining what I think the first column of "Stick Control" should look like here:

http://haredrums.blogspot.com/2014/10/food-for-thought-minor-stick-control.html

Basically, I think the first column should include inverted double strokes. Has anyone already wrote about this? Do you guys agree/disagree?

I know that suggesting any changes to such an important book is sort of ridiculous, but I think that this minor change really makes a lot of sense. Anyways, let me know what you think.
Yes I do, Andrew! It covers so many useful combinations of sticking and those that it misses can easily be "coded" to make up for anything missing. But I might have ordered a few things differently, especially on the first page. Maybe Stone did it on purpose, to push you into the book further, but I would have definitely put inverted doubles in that first column. They are great for strengthening the 2nd beat of a double stroke roll. And they are the first of the displacement patterns, allowing you to shift the beat placement while maintaining the pattern. The only reason I could see to not place them early on is that it might be harder to keep the doubles offset at a given tempo, specifically because it's so simple and short. If you're moving at a good clip you might not hear the doubles as offset, at least not as well as say, inverted paradiddles.

I was doing an exercise the other day which had flams starting on the downbeat and then every other stroke using the 1st column of page 5 of SC. Inverted flam taps (called Doublé by Basel drummers) are one of my favorite rudiments; the motion it creates is really cool. They go:

lR L rL R lR L rL R or
rL R lR L rL R lR L

Your new 4th and 6th line would make it work nicely.
 

Derek

Silver Member
I also agree with you. It's a good suggestion, and the exercises flow better with your example. Thanks for the column, good stuff there.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
That's great, totally--even though he puts those patterns in the bowels of p. 6, they are really essential. That initial set gets used by itself so much, for different things, that the patterns really belong there. I don't think when he wrote the thing Stone was necessarily trying to create one of the basic pieces of drumming logic everyone uses for everything, but that is what it has become. So that gets penciled in from here on out.
 

haredrums

Silver Member
That's great, totally--even though he puts those patterns in the bowels of p. 6, they are really essential. That initial set gets used by itself so much, for different things, that the patterns really belong there. I don't think when he wrote the thing Stone was necessarily trying to create one of the basic pieces of drumming logic everyone uses for everything, but that is what it has become. So that gets penciled in from here on out.
Whew, that is a relief! Todd, you are a monster with this book so I was afraid of what you might have to say! I'm glad everyone seems to be on the same page about this.
 
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