Mind went blank... help.

That Guy

Platinum Member
Today I was talking with a friend of mine and he brought up the topic of drumming. Already knowing that I'm a drummer he mentioned that he thinks his son wants to get into it. He mentioned the usual tell-tale signs of a kid who wants to drum, banging on everything and air drumming to music. His son is 13 and has never touched a drum in his life.. and he feels that his son has a bit of natural rhythm from listening to him.

He said that he wanted to see if there was anything that he could do to find out if his son really wants to learn or if its just a stage he is going through. I told him that he needed to "jump on it right away" cuz if its something that this boy desires it might help to give him some direction, cuz it appears he is starting to go down the wrong street.

He mentioned that he couldn't afford lessons at the moment and wanted to know if there were any books or DVD's that could teach him the very basics so he would have a good foundation. This is where my mind went totally blank. I tried to think of some book or DVD that could strip things down and get to the basics of notation, sticking and proper technique... but I couldn't. So, I told him to give me about a day or two and I would come back with a few suggestions. I also gave him the web-address of Drummerworld and suggested that he and his son check it out along with the forum.

I can't believe I drew a blank and I'm still dumbfounded. All of the books and DVD's that I love are intermediate to advanced and I don't know of anything elementary.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
Today I was talking with a friend of mine and he brought up the topic of drumming. Already knowing that I'm a drummer he mentioned that he thinks his son wants to get into it. He mentioned the usual tell-tale signs of a kid who wants to drum, banging on everything and air drumming to music. His son is 13 and has never touched a drum in his life.. and he feels that his son has a bit of natural rhythm from listening to him.

He said that he wanted to see if there was anything that he could do to find out if his son really wants to learn or if its just a stage he is going through. I told him that he needed to "jump on it right away" cuz if its something that this boy desires it might help to give him some direction, cuz it appears he is starting to go down the wrong street.

He mentioned that he couldn't afford lessons at the moment and wanted to know if there were any books or DVD's that could teach him the very basics so he would have a good foundation. This is where my mind went totally blank. I tried to think of some book or DVD that could strip things down and get to the basics of notation, sticking and proper technique... but I couldn't. So, I told him to give me about a day or two and I would come back with a few suggestions. I also gave him the web-address of Drummerworld and suggested that he and his son check it out along with the forum.

I can't belive I drew a blank and I'm still dumbfounded. All of the books and DVD's that I love are immediate to advanced and I don't know of anything elementary.

Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.
Sit down with the kid behind a set (preferably his if he has one, or yours) and teach him a basic rock beat, kick on one and three, snare on two and four. I do this with neighborhood kids all the time who are curious about drums. If he has a desire to try and organize his pot-banging, he may have a special aptitude and if not, it might be a phase.
 

That Guy

Platinum Member
Yes, I forgot to mention that I did tell him I would give him a few lessons for free just to see if its really something that he wants to do.
 

Drummer Karl

KARL MEMBER
Although 13 is a good age for giving it a try it might always be kind of a difficult situation.
He really seems to like the instrument, at least he shows interest in playing rhythms.

If young people are confronted with an instrument in a certain way they will love it. If not, they easily and quickly lose this interest. That`s why I think it`s a difficult situation.
13 mostly is still not the age of showing interest in academic approaches, at least in most cases.
I once got the chance to teach a 12-years old. I noticed that he had a lot of fun with just doing it but avoided working on techical problems or even learning abstract systems. When it was connected with doing it though it had an almost magical effect. Showing him how you can use a paradiddle in a grrove context made him want to try. Just by orchestrating it he "learned" about the movement and the essentials of those rudiments.

Kids are said to be honest, this seems to hold true regarding "learning" an instrument. I think that it`s important to get conscious about kids` approach - in this case towards the instrument: Learning by doing. For older students, speaking of adults for example, it may oftenly be vice versa. Young students might want to see results before practicing an abstract "thing", they want to see connections to vizualize, unconsciously they ask "why?" before sitting down to practice with some sheets.

Unfortunatly you can`t use "kids" as a general group, remember that every 13-years old is different and shows an individual level of maturity. Parenting takes a big piece of this cake.
Talk with him and see "what he`s like". Haha, I know that may sound strange...
Find out what music he likes and what he dislikes. Try to connect basics with the music itself, involve it. ;-)

Rather than letting him watch DVDs I`d teach him. Listening is important but this doesn`t cut the diamond in my opinion. Unfortunatly I can`t address the issue of money, I don`t know how long you would want to teach him without getting paid...

Good luck mate!

Karl
 

rogue_drummer

Gold Member
I agree with what has been said and will add my own thoughts. Just about everyone has said to set him down at a drum set and show him all the cool things that can be done: rock, jazz, marches, etc. Teach him a few simple grooves to plant the learning seed. Heck, just let him just bang around on them if you are so inclined.

Show him techniques like how to hold the sticks: traditional and match grips, how to position the drums and hit so he doesn't break the heads, cymbals, etc. This all can be done in an hour or less.

If he still in interested and wants to truly learn, then steer him towards a basic book to learn the theory of music, notes, etc. Haskell Harr books 1 and 2 are made to introduce a student to the snare drum and teaches the strudent note values, rudiments, songs for the share drum, etc. And I beleive they come with DVDs to aid the process. 2B drum sticks and a practice pad can also be bought cheaply to get the kid on his way. At 13 he's probably still in junior high, so those tools are a good start to possibly get him into beginner band if he so desires. Maybe an inexpensive metronome can be added to develop a steady beat.

Anyways, just my .02 cents!
 

Drumsword

Pioneer Member
Yes, "Realistic Rock" by Carmine appice is a good book (Or DVD) to start with. Thats was one of my first books.
 

tomgrosset

Pioneer Member
I'm teaching an 11 year old girl how to drum with Carmine Appice's book, "Realistic Rock" and it's going very well. It's a great starting point for someone who is just starting out. It was also the first drum book I used when I started drumming.
 

The Colonel

Silver Member
Yeah - you get a few pages into it and you're already busting out some cool beats - As soon as I hit the 2nd chapter with the 8th notes I knew I was going to be a drummer.
 
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