Mid-range drums stock heads comparision and other features

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
There will always be a store front for music stores. Even if they have a huge internet presence and 90% of their sales are from the internet. How we see them now is probably not what they will look like in the future though. What I see is large warehouse type places that store the inventory with a small store front that only has demo gear up there. Nothing in the front is sold to the public. No more buying "off the rack". You test in the front of the store, and purchase new items taken from the back. This keeps extraneous inventory low, the store front smaller, and less money lost to having a B&M "demo" store. As models get redesigned/replaced/discontinued, the stuff from the front of the store goes up for sale as "demo" items at a discounted cost making room for the new gear.

Dealers can become more niche oriented so more demo models can be carried on the demo floor without taking up too much space. If you want to be a Tama dealer, you carry their lines, but you don't carry DW, Pearl, Gretsch or Ludwig, etc. Your specialized sales allows you to move more equipment for cheaper prices. Other stores carry different gear and move lots of volume of that specific product. Overall product still moves as much as it does today, competition still lives because you have to keep your prices down and move more volume, B&M stores live as demo stores and internet pricing is the new norm.
 

STXBob

Gold Member
I dunno, Tommy. That would require dealers to employ actual sales professionals. Do you want to walk into a drum shop and be treated like you're at a car dealership? Because that's precisely what going to happen. The Tama dealer won't want you to go to the Ludwig dealer. He'll motivate his staff to close you as a first-time "up."

The B&M store won't disappear.
 

Dodeska

Senior Member
The B&M stores won't disappear, there will just be fewer of them & they'll be bigger so that they can show more lines.
The place I just got my Armory from had loads of kits on display from pretty much every company (there was 3 or 4 different Armory kits on display too!). It also had huge selections of e-kits, cymbals, hardware & accessories. And that was only the drum area! They had hundreds of guitars, amps, keys, etc, and the place was doing a roaring trade when I was there.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I think the days of brick and mortar music stores are numbered. In 20 years I wonder how many will be around. Everything is going internet, it's cheaper. Cheaper almost always wins.
Unfortunately, I think you're right, certainly about "cheaper nearly always wins". :( I do believe the very best stores will still survive. Those that truly offer a substantial selection backed with good demo facilities & knowledgable staff will continue to add value that players are willing to (quite rightly) pay for, but they will be rare - perhaps limited to a few per continent :(

Due partly to the high margin demands in distribution, adding to the margins required by dealers, many smaller high quality makers are effectively locked out of global distribution. That trend will continue unfortunately, so expect choice outside of the biggest volume producers to diminish further over time.

There will always be a store front for music stores. Even if they have a huge internet presence and 90% of their sales are from the internet. How we see them now is probably not what they will look like in the future though. What I see is large warehouse type places that store the inventory with a small store front that only has demo gear up there. Nothing in the front is sold to the public. No more buying "off the rack". You test in the front of the store, and purchase new items taken from the back. This keeps extraneous inventory low, the store front smaller, and less money lost to having a B&M "demo" store. As models get redesigned/replaced/discontinued, the stuff from the front of the store goes up for sale as "demo" items at a discounted cost making room for the new gear.

Dealers can become more niche oriented so more demo models can be carried on the demo floor without taking up too much space. If you want to be a Tama dealer, you carry their lines, but you don't carry DW, Pearl, Gretsch or Ludwig, etc. Your specialized sales allows you to move more equipment for cheaper prices. Other stores carry different gear and move lots of volume of that specific product. Overall product still moves as much as it does today, competition still lives because you have to keep your prices down and move more volume, B&M stores live as demo stores and internet pricing is the new norm.
Quite possibly the most depressing scenario of benign buying experience for drummers. Regrettably, it might just happen. Brand, brand, brand, price, price, price, finish, sizes, sound - in that order. In other words, pretty much as it is now :(
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
Quite possibly the most depressing scenario of benign buying experience for drummers.
Not to flip your words around, but isnt that how your shop works? Display models of the lines you offer in the display room available for people to play, but ultimately not for sale. They have to order through you and wait for the kit to be built. Whats wrong with that scenario? You carry limited lines, your display area is small but all lines are represented. The visitor gets to try all the lines and decide what they want.

In todays scenario, stores carry all different brands with all lines available for purchase, but what sits on display? The cheap kits are on display and anything of mid range or better quality is either in back in boxes, or on display on a shelf near the ceiling. How does that help the drummer of today who wants to buy a nice kit?

Wouldnt you rather go to a store who specializes in just a few brands instead of ALL brands and who offers up the full range of these brands products on display for you to try? You may get a bit of a car salesman effect from sales people, but it depends on how they are getting paid. Anyone making commissions will be a pushy salesman. No commission and you keep it casual. The drummer may have to go to a few different stores to try different things, but because not every product is sold by one store, it spreads the wealth around a little bit to everyone. If you love Gretsch drums, Yamaha hardware, and UFIP cymbals, you will probably be shopping at 3 different stores.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Not to flip your words around, but isnt that how your shop works?
Hahaha, you have a point ;) It wasn't so much the mechanism you described, more the image I created in my own mind of a large warehouse with small demo room, with low knowledge staff moving large volumes of generic gear based primarily on the lowest price. My bad.
 

Tommy_D

Platinum Member
Well, the staff could become more knowlegable on the products because they are selling less brands and they have the equipment right there to play and hear. They actually become sales people who know the in's and out's of their product and can help the customer with questions they have instead of sitting there playing Candy Crush on their phone and saying, "Well, DW is the best so I would recommend those."
 
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