Micing the kit for practice?

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
The last couple days I've decided to mic my kick and snare and run them to my IEMs just to practice with. It's set up the same way as my live rig, with a click on one channel, accompanying music, or backing tracks on another, and then the live drums on their own.

I've never practiced like this before. I always figured, the drums are loud enough, I don't need them in my ears also, but I'm REALLY liking it. I can give myself a great mix between the drums and the tracks/click. It's been especially helpful for locking in kick patterns and capturing the right feel or pocket on some songs.

Anyone else do this? I'd love to hear your thoughts.
 

One Up One Down

Senior Member
I do this too. It helps to hear the highs which are most muffled by the hearing protection (for me anyway). I like to hear the quality of the hi-hat sound that i'm making. I only have two mics -- one over the kit and one on the bass drum. It's enough.
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
Haven't tried it-yet, but something I really want to do.

Mostly to help get used to working with a click\tracks and my IEMs because a couple I started working with do pretty everything that way.

Thinking two overhead condensers to start. See how that sounds.
 

Moejo

Senior Member
Haven't tried it-yet, but something I really want to do.

Mostly to help get used to working with a click\tracks and my IEMs because a couple I started working with do pretty everything that way.

Thinking two overhead condensers to start. See how that sounds.
That's how I practice. I was running a full mic setup but got tired of tearing it all down at gig time, so I just hooked up my Zoom Q2N through my interface and run that as a single room mic. Works great! Cheap easy way too mic up for practice.
 
The last couple days I've decided to mic my kick and snare and run them to my IEMs just to practice with. It's set up the same way as my live rig, with a click on one channel, accompanying music, or backing tracks on another, and then the live drums on their own.

I've never practiced like this before. I always figured, the drums are loud enough, I don't need them in my ears also, but I'm REALLY liking it. I can give myself a great mix between the drums and the tracks/click. It's been especially helpful for locking in kick patterns and capturing the right feel or pocket on some songs.

Anyone else do this? I'd love to hear your thoughts.
What's your mic setup for this LDD?

I've used both my zoom H4n to monitor and a 'proper' setup of one or two overheads and kick mic. It's certainly a lot quicker to setup and plug into the zoom.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Over the last couple of years as I purchased mics for the drums, I've been doing this. I've used IEMs for a decade or so now, and hearing myself clearly in the IEMs has really helped to nail my note-for-note accuracy, tempo, and touch. I recommend it if you have the means.
 

Bonzo_CR

Silver Member
A while back I set up some mics (kick, snare, 2 overheads) on my home practice kit running into a Zoom R24. I originally set this up for recording, but I have kept the setup in place, and sometimes I run the mix into IEM's for monitoring/practice.
It's nice to hear the properly mixed kit for practice rather than the reduced highs of earplugs. I agree it helps with monitoring/improving note accuracy too.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
If I’m limited to two mics, I’ll hang overheads ‘cuz my primary area of practice is to balance the loudness between all instruments (before I started recording myself, my hats & snare were way too loud compared to how I played everything else). If I use four mics, then it’s kick, snare + overheads.

Example (‘cuz I wanna try out the link feature in this new forum):

 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
What's your mic setup for this LDD?

I've used both my zoom H4n to monitor and a 'proper' setup of one or two overheads and kick mic. It's certainly a lot quicker to setup and plug into the zoom.
Right now I just have a PZM mic in the kick. I'm thinking of adding at least one overhead to capture the rest of the kit. Because it's just for practice I don't want to over do it with stuff that I'll have to rip down every time I need to move the kit out for a session, or use the mics for a gig.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Right now I just have a PZM mic in the kick. I'm thinking of adding at least one overhead to capture the rest of the kit. Because it's just for practice I don't want to over do it with stuff that I'll have to rip down every time I need to move the kit out for a session, or use the mics for a gig.
That is DEFINITELY the downside. I only mike the kit up if I know it's not going anywhere for weeks.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
I used a Crown PZM mic for years as my only mic. I placed it on the floor between the snare and the bass drum. The cymbals were a little weak but it revealed what I needed to improve my playing.
 

Living Dead Drummer

Platinum Member
I used a Crown PZM mic for years as my only mic. I placed it on the floor between the snare and the bass drum. The cymbals were a little weak but it revealed what I needed to improve my playing.
I started with mine like that, but I was getting too much snare, not enough kick.
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
I have a Zoom H6. After reading about the Yamaha EAD, I laid my H6
on top of my bass drum (on a towel) and recorded from there.

Surprisingly well balanced between bass and snare....
 

TMe

Senior Member
...my primary area of practice is to balance the loudness between all instruments...
Would it make sense to use only a single mic' for that? When I was researching how to record drums at home, a number of sound guys suggested learning to record with only one mic' because that would encourage a drummer to develop a well balanced sound - which makes them a lot easier to record in a studio with multiple mic's.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Great move.

They sound different and the extra equipment can be distracting if you are not used to it...even when using it for years then taking a bit of time off and woodshed-ing without it/coming back to it.

I don't practice how I perform except as a run up to something...but I want the equipment and sound to be static so I can focus on the music not the music instrument.
 
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