Mic'd Up Home Kits

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Just curious as to why. Unless doing some home recording, I dont really understand why mics are needed. I'm not knocking it by any means, I guess I want to know what they are used for in a home only setup.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
There’s those few that make profits from content, lessons, professional work that you mention.

Then there’s some homers that like to practice chops, practice mic placements/processing playbacks, sharing/promoting themselves, drum content goodwill, and some just for fun which is where I would fit in.
(*edit - I would like to contribute in the content area.)

The 2nd paragraph nuances seem more stressful in band conditions practice/gigs, these skills are more or less gained in proficiency from meet after meet.
 
Last edited:

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
You basically answered your own question.
No mics, no recording.
But one does not need a full set of mics to record if just for self evaluation. One works just fine. So does a phone. But full mics, mixer, PA, IEMs, this I dont understand.

I understand for the home tracker, studio musician, beat maker, teacher, etc., someone who uses their instrument to make money. Those of us who dont, why?
 

organworthyplayer337

Well-known member
But one does not need a full set of mics to record if just for self evaluation. One works just fine. So does a phone. But full mics, mixer, PA, IEMs, this I dont understand.

I understand for the home tracker, studio musician, beat maker, teacher, etc., someone who uses their instrument to make money. Those of us who dont, why?
Assuming you don't fall into any of those categories (studio musicians, beat maker, etc), and you don't have a mic'ed up home kit, sounds to me like you're exactly where you want to be?

Some could argue that you only need kick, snare, and hats too. There will always be players looking "down" on others for something. Some players that play 3-pc think those who play 5pc are excessive. Some players who play 5pc think that people who play 7pc are excessive. Endless cycle.
 

DrumWhipper

Member
I mic mine up at home so I can run tracks that I’m rehearsing for upcoming shows. I feed the tracks into my board then run my in ears. I get the track, click, and my drums all in the same mix.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
A well mic’d kit sounds awesome and way better than single mic phone or zoom recordings. Which they aren’t bad but generally don’t pic up lows in toms like direct mic. I was always amazed how good my old Pearl Vision kit sounded in concerts it was mic’d -I’d ask sound engineer “Is that me? “ in disbelief.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I like having things mic'd up because everything is cleaner and clearer while I'm practicing.
I agree with this. Also, I like to practice the way I play live or in the studio: with a mic'ed up drumset I can clearly hear, especially the kick. It's also much easier to hear yourself above prerecorded tracks for playalongs.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I think playing mic'd and un-mic'd have minor differences literally in how you approach the playing and hit the drums. Practicing with mics and a headset to get the feedback from those mics can have nice effect on your ability to play with mics later on, and make the small adjustments in how, where and what you hit. I always recommend trying to mic up and see how you sound in the cans for a while before going in to a record studio too.

Early on it can also be a little jarring to hear everything so well. I remember one of my first bigger gigs as a kid it was the first time having my kit mic'd for a presentation and when I heard the bass drum so clearly it kinda made me get into my head too much about my bass drum lines if that makes any sense.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
I ran a project studio for around 5 and a recording studio for about 12 years - until 2013. In the beginning the recording studio was planned as a studio for pushing our own projects exclusively - which in the end didn't fly. So we opened it for productions of local bands, vocalists and other projects to keep it up and running. Focus was on smaller productions, not taking too much time for set up and production to keep it affordable for the local musicians. In the end I didn't do a single long player on my own in my own studio.

In 2015 I had to leave the place because the owner declared personal needs (which in Germany is a legal reason for kicking people out of ones property). After slowly transitioning to a different profession over the decades (slowly starting in 1995) I noticed that not only drumming and playing other instruments, but also recording, mixing and mastering is one of my absolutely favorite activities. So I was looking for a new spot to spend my free time at, which I finally found two years ago, the "Klangwerk am Elm". In the meantime, switching to a new income basis rewarded me with a much better financial standing which enabled me to purchase microphones, studio monitors and the like of a much higher value than the stuff I was recording with those days. No intention to make any money with it, I just love to take my time to play with microphone selection and placement, drum tunings, reamping and what not. It's not about becoming famous on youtube, making money from it or anything, it's just about spending my rare time with something I really love.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Early on it can also be a little jarring to hear everything so well. I remember one of my first bigger gigs as a kid it was the first time having my kit mic'd for a presentation and when I heard the bass drum so clearly it kinda made me get into my head too much about my bass drum lines if that makes any sense.
I totally had that in the beginning too, but now I really have come to rely on a good crisp bass drum in my in-ears to cement my playing. It's so easy to waffle on a strong, authoritative downbeat if you are only going on the physical sensation of beater hitting head. With a mike on your bass drum you can clearly hear if you are starting to slack off. In my blues/funk/covers band where we do a good bit of four-on-the-floor slamming, I need to hear that clearly. It also helps me really lock in solidly with the bass player.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Some could argue that you only need kick, snare, and hats too. There will always be players looking "down" on others for something. Some players that play 3-pc think those who play 5pc are excessive. Some players who play 5pc think that people who play 7pc are excessive. Endless cycle.
Well that's definitely true. I'm all for people having what they want (to an extent). Do folks buy mics for their drums just for looks?
 

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
well i guess if you wear earplugs or IEMS you can’t really hear the kit you perfectly tuned and spent thousands on, so you get some mics to hear them. that’s why i don’t particularly like ear protection even if i use it.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
It’s like @Fritz Frigursson eluded to, hearing protection and quality of audio while doing so.

With my earphones, they are isolating enough to where I barely hear the drums I’m playing.
So hearing protection in a sense, there’s that.

Couple that experience with being able to clearly hear your kit while controlling the mic situations, eq where no one tells you anything, and control volume that you’re hearing.

Though it has changed my shedding experience, it’s pretty fun!
 
Last edited:
Top