Metal or Wood?

Quai34

Junior Member
I use wood for indoor gigs and metal for outdoor gigs.
Ha, interesting never thought about that. Is it because the metal snare are louder or projects more?
 

Quai34

Junior Member
I recommend aluminum for your first metal snare as it has that "woody" quality you want. A Ludwig Acrolite is a fine example.
Ha ok, I thought that it was the driest and the most ringing of all the snares, just after Steel for the ringing...I heard recently the new Tama Reserve hammered aluminium and I would say, I liked it a lot...Maybe the hammering that gives more complex harmonics that I like, as It's how I like my cymbals usually.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Ha ok, I thought that it was the driest and the most ringing of all the snares, just after Steel for the ringing...I heard recently the new Tama Reserve hammered aluminium and I would say, I liked it a lot...Maybe the hammering that gives more complex harmonics that I like, as It's how I like my cymbals usually.
Snare ringing is one of those funny things. It can be, and often is very useful and the great thing is that it is easily controlled when you don't want it.

Be sure to let us know what you choose. There's no shortage of great snare drums out there.
 

brushes

Well-known member
Hmmm... Depends on the snare/construction. Some wood snares are much louder than some metal snares. Just saying...
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Yep, metal snares are *generally* louder than wood snares, but there are tons of examples where this is not the case. For instance, my 14x5.5" Canopus The Maple snare is louder than my 14x5" Supraphonic.

But basically, if you had to make a generalized statement about which is louder, it'd be metal.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
I've only used a wood snare that came with my original kit. It's all I had for some 40 years. Slingerland Stage Band. Then I decided I should have a metal snare and snagged a Pearl Sensitone chrome over steel in good condition for $50. I love it. A couple months ago I bought a used/new kit that came with another wood snare. Yamaha Stage Custom. I haven't used it much but will play with the tuning to try and get it where I like it. But right now I really enjoy the Sensitone. It's got a brighter sound that cuts through the rest of the kit so much better. I bet that if I stick with the Sensitone for any length of time I'll probably like the wood snare because it's just different. Sometimes we like a change of pace, just because.
 

roncadillac

Member
I like the sound of both wood and metal but situationally. I have been preferring wood for most applications lately but when I play live I always found myself having to "overplay" my snare a bit. Metal feels better to me, always, but the overtones tend to mask poor technique where as wood "gets in then gets out" so to speak so if you aren't spot on... It's certainly heard. I don't like having a ton of gear around but having a wood and metal snare is worth while, though I currently only own 1 snare and it's wood haha. I do miss having a metal snare option.

I also hate playing brushes on wood.
 

Ronzo

Junior Member
As a new drummer I have been fortunate to have played both materials but only brass and maple.
My current snare is a Tama SLP black brass (42 strand) and it is really loud! 📢 Have to dampen it in some way most times in the basement.
The maple one was a Yamaha Tour Custom but was sold. Kinda miss it. :(
Currently on the hunt for Tama SLP 12” oak snare.
 

roncadillac

Member
As a new drummer I have been fortunate to have played both materials but only brass and maple.
My current snare is a Tama SLP black brass (42 strand) and it is really loud! 📢 Have to dampen it in some way most times in the basement.
The maple one was a Yamaha Tour Custom but was sold. Kinda miss it. :(
Currently on the hunt for Tama SLP 12” oak snare.

Wow, for a "new drummer" you've certainly got expensive tastes haha. I've been playing just shy of twenty years and I've never owned anything in the SLP price range. I'm not giving you crap by any means, you do you my friend, but it's an interesting observation.
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
As a new drummer I have been fortunate to have played both materials but only brass and maple.
My current snare is a Tama SLP black brass (42 strand) and it is really loud! 📢 Have to dampen it in some way most times in the basement.
The maple one was a Yamaha Tour Custom but was sold. Kinda miss it. :(
Currently on the hunt for Tama SLP 12” oak snare.

Oak is great for snares! I have oak in 13x6.5 and 14x5.5. Both very nice drums.

I expect that 12" oak SLP will have a much greater voice that it's size implies.

Based on the numbers, safe to say brass is my fav for metal snares. I have 2 steel (14x7 and 14x5.5), 1 aluminimum (14x6.5), and 4 brass (14x6.5, 14x5.5, 14x3.5, and 13x6.5).

I am very happy with all of those. However, the one metal I have yet to try - and am curious to - is copper. Yet to come across one in person.

Our time will come mystery copper snare :D
 

Justinhub2003

Well-known member
I have 11 Snares. 5 wood (Maple, Steambent Walnut, 10ply Maple, Beech, Oak/maple) and 6 Metal (Aluminum, COB, 5mm Cast Bronze, Brass, & Copper).

If I had to pick just 1 to use the rest of the my life it would probably be my Sonor Benny Greb 2.0 (Made of beech), just because its so damn versatile. But I think its great to have Metal and Wood snares in your arsenal. I actually just added the Benny Greb 2.0 Brass version today. So If I had to sell all my snares but 2, I'd for sure keep those 2 snares (And try to sneak my Supraphonic in to).

So the answer is Both.
 

Ronzo

Junior Member
Wow, for a "new drummer" you've certainly got expensive tastes haha. I've been playing just shy of twenty years and I've never owned anything in the SLP price range. I'm not giving you crap by any means, you do you my friend, but it's an interesting observation.
Yes I do.
My worse fear in life is when I die my wife sells all my stuff for what I told her I paid! Bwahaha!
Seriously though, the snare is waayyy outside my skill level...by a long shot.
But how could I not buy it for $549 Canadian $ brand new?
 

roncadillac

Member
Yes I do.
My worse fear in life is when I die my wife sells all my stuff for what I told her I paid! Bwahaha!
Seriously though, the snare is waayyy outside my skill level...by a long shot.
But how could I not buy it for $549 Canadian $ brand new?

Haha! That's why I try to sell something first (even if it barely covered the new item)... At least I can tell my wife I tried lol.

That's cool though and I'm happy my comment was well received as I meant no harm. Cheers man!
 

Quai34

Junior Member
Snare ringing is one of those funny things. It can be, and often is very useful and the great thing is that it is easily controlled when you don't want it.

Be sure to let us know what you choose. There's no shortage of great snare drums out there.
I will, the fact is that I just bought the Snare Tama Reserve Plain Sendan 6.5X 14 so, I need to save before buying my 3rd Snare... And if a good deal appears on the Star Reserve 15X8 Maple Bubinga, I will buy it for sure because I really like th concept of a 15 floor tom and Snare tuned low... So, the metal Snare might be the 4th one only. All that to say that It's not for tomorrow!!!! I know I have just received one new snare and already thinking about the new one but when you know what to look for, you can focus on just saving instead of browsing around...Or you could wait and look for a good deal on the type of Snare you want, then, at the end, no disappointment and always love for what you just got...
 

Neal Pert

Well-known member
I don't have an overall preference-- I like them for different things. I have a couple wood and a couple metal. I try to get a nice spread from my small collection. I want them to do different things for me so that I'm making a choice based on, well, something. Do I want big and resonant? Dry and crisp? Bright and meaty? Over the years I had a theory that a good collection has at least these four drums:

1. Shallow metal -- something Acrolite-ish. For me, it's a Yamaha Recording Custom 5.5x14 aluminum
2. Deep metal -- something Black Beauty-ish. Yamaha Recording Custom 6.5x14 brass
3. Shallow wood -- something modern wood-ish. Yamaha Absolute Hybrid Maple 6x15
4. Deep wood -- something Radio King-ish. Noble and Cooley 7x14 SS Maple

And, if necessary, 5 (and 6) would be something that isn't covered with the sounds you can get from the four. Maybe a 13 or a cast metal drum or whatever. But really, the four will usually do it for me. I think I have 6 now-- the other two are a 1930s 6 lug Ludwig COB and a 60s Slingerland Artist, both of which have been around for a long time and have great sentimental value.
 

iCe

Senior Member
There is just something about the sound of a wood snare, that "pop" you can't get from a metal snare without added "ring".
Exactly what you said!!! I feel the same....but I was just going to post the name kind of question and found this thread and I have few questions/remarks:
1) I realized a lot of you have only 3/4 snares while I was thinking that you all have 20/30 + more snare...Well, maybe my reference with my friend make me a bit biased because he has 35 snares...
2) I have a metal snare, Chrome over Steel that was wrapped to match the kit, I don't ear the extra ring that I don't like with metal snare, is it the warp?
3) Is there is one metal snare that I Should try being a "wood snare guy", it should be a copper right? Or Bronze? I still cannot remember which one is the woodiest metal?

I'm just set on one snare. I can understand the need for more than one snare though if you're a session drummer, but besides that any reason is fine.
I do use only one snare drum at the moment though. I have 3 in 'reserve' that i don't use; a Pearl Vision 14x5.5 snare that came with that kit and never got a good sound out of it.
The 2 Osan snares i have were my main snares for quite some years, but haven't been used since i started using my main snare now since it's just the perfect snare for me.
I do like the idea of having a 10 or 12" metal side snare to have a different sound available and with snares off it's a nice timbale-esque sound, but somewhat hesitant since i don't really need it (just the idea intrigues me, not that i need it for a specific part in a song... yet)
 
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