Medium vs. Heavy duty hardware

UpandIn

Member
I currently play in a cover band and we gig about every other weekend on average. Sometimes more and sometimes less. I've been using a Gibraltar rack for the last 3+ years and am thinking of switching to stands. Does anyone have any experience with the Medium weight hardware such as the Gibraltar 6600 series? Is it sturdy enough? I would not consider myself a heavy hitter. Thanks for any input. I've already done searches for this and haven't really found a good review or answer.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I currently play in a cover band and we gig about every other weekend on average. Sometimes more and sometimes less. I've been using a Gibraltar rack for the last 3+ years and am thinking of switching to stands. Does anyone have any experience with the Medium weight hardware such as the Gibraltar 6600 series? Is it sturdy enough? I would not consider myself a heavy hitter. Thanks for any input. I've already done searches for this and haven't really found a good review or answer.
I don't have any experience with what you're looking at, but I will tell you, I thought I needed DW 5000 series stuff at one time, and over time I got lighter and lighter. Now, I use Tama Stage Master single-braced stands (hi hat and snare), and Ludwig flat-based cymbal stands. My throne is still a DW 5000, since I'm the heaviest part of my kit. I can be a heavy hitter when I need to be and this stuff just keeps up. I've never needed a rack and will never buy heavy double-braced hardware again. In fact, it's kinda' cool to look up on stage and see mostly drums because the hardware doesn't get in the way.

Now of course, if you have to get a cymbal in a strange place, then obviously you'll need some kind of weight so you can boom it, but I never do that. All of my stuff is compacted in front of me.

So to answer your one question, whether or not you think medium weight stands will do, I say "yes". In fact, you could go lighter and still get through the gig (Gibraltar makes those nice jazz stands too). And I have the added benefit of being able to set-up inside 20 minutes and my trap case is really light!
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
With Bo on this. If the quality is good, single braced is the way forward. Case in point, I just got hold of a collection of 80's Pearl hardware (along with a kit - check 'Your Place' for details!) and it's all good quality stuff - better than most of the hardware I habitually use. Some of it is single braced, some of it double and I have a great preference for the lighter hardware. It's nearly as solid and gets the job done without breaking your back. Unless you are mounting a lot from a single stand, good-quality, single braced hardware is the way to go.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
@OP: When the time came to buy new boom stands for a new kit at our church (in other words, a kit that is up all the time and getting played hard at least 3 times a week), I bought Gibraltar 5609 boom stands - actually one level down from the 6600s you're considering. The cymbals are an 18" crash and 20" medium weight ride; plus one stand has an 18" Ozone on another boom clamped onto it. They don't budge. They're solid. You should have no issues.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
UpandIn, I have heavy hardware (a lot of it--in bins now).

Now, ALL I use is the lighter weight DW 7000 straight or, the 6000 straight stands.

I have the lighter version 2 leg (think it's a 3500 now) hat stand. I need a 2 leg stand, but I like the 7000 hat stand a lot.

I play the flat base stuff in a heavy rock band. I can put a 24" Giant Beat ride on it and beat the p*$$ out of it (if I choose to), and it's not going anywhere--it's not real low either.

I only use straight stands, so I can't respond on how the FB booms work, but the 7000 with a boom I have used, and it is PLENTY sturdy for any cymbal.

I find the FB straights are very sturdy up to medium high (average, eye level) played with a pretty good amount of gusto. Played really hard they "move" a little, but they aren't going to fall over.

I put my tom on a FB 6000 snare stand and it's solid, and the grip is plenty enough, and the basket arms are small enough to not choke the drum at all.

I use a 7000 snare stand because it goes lower than the FB 6000. It'll move a little if your really going at it, but other than that, it's stable and stays put.

Gibraltar also makes REALLY NICE Flat Base stands, but I went with the DW because of the Memory locks.

If you don't want to go the flat base route, the single braced stuff a lot lighter, & is plenty sturdy for just about anyone, but beefy enough to boom stuff off of too.

As to the quality of the DW 7000/6000 series stands, they are VERY well made.
Smooth at all points, and the memory locks are great. The tilter is the same on the heavy stuff too.

I have a tall hardware case, so I just fold up the legs, and I'm done. The case is A LOT lighter since I made the switch, and they've all held up great going on 2 years now.

Good luck!
 

Deathmetalconga

Platinum Member
I think it depends on what you put on the stands. You don't need a DW9000 series boom stand to hold a six-inch splash cymbal, but a lot of people have a "forest of stands" around their set with inefficient uses like that.

I would rather have fewer, heavier stands than more, lighter stands. I pile a lot of things on my stands, so I use DW9000 series hardware. On one stand, I have a suspended floor tom, an 18 China, a 17 splash, a 12 crash and an 8 splash. Most people would use at least a couple of stands for all this. Yes, the DW9000 weighs more, but I pile a lot on it and it's going on its 15 year being absolutely reliable.
 
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mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
I think it depends on what you put on the stands. You don't need a DW9000 series boom stand to hold a six-inch splash cymbal, but a lot of people have a "forest of stands" around their set with inefficient uses like that.

I would rather have fewer, heavier stands than more, lighter stands. I pile a lot of things on my stands, so I use DW9000 series hardware. On one stand, I have a suspended floor tom, an 18 China, a 17 splash, a 12 crash and an 8 splash. Most people would use at least a couple of stands for all this. Yes, the DW9000 weighs more, but I pile a lot on it and it's going on its 15 year being absolutely reliable.
I think DMC has got it right on that route. It depends on kit size. I'm playing a small kit without much in terms of add-ons, so I can use lightweight stands. It comes down to total weight as well. If by having two heavy duty stands, you save weight by not having so many, lighter weight stands - then that's perfectly reasonable. Having a lot of heavy stands is definitely a bad idea. I prefer lighter hardware (single braced) if I can get away with it and I believe that except in extreme circumstances you probably don't need very heavy hardware - you just THINK you do because of the garbage manufacturers pedal to you. For most cases, I think high-quality, single braced stands are perfectly adequate.
 

makinao

Silver Member
I have a 6600 boom stand for my 22" A medium ride. It is rock solid. I also have a Pearl 820W hi-hat stand, which is also middle weight. But I think both are quite heavy, and I wouldn't enjoy carrying four pieces of them to a gig. So I didn't get more for my other cymbals. I stuck with my three 70's Tama Titan cymbal stands, which were heavyweights at the time, but would be about the weight as the Gibraltar 5600 series now. They are just fine for my 16" A thin crash, 20" A crashride, and 16" Stagg SH china. And I have a no-name 5600-series clone for my 12" and 13" tom.

So today's "medium" weight hardware is fine for me, and in some cases even overkill. It all depends on what you will load them with. I survived my power-rock 80's phase with 5600 weight hardware. And now that I'm in my fifty's, I have no interest in carrying around anything heavier than 6600-weight stands.
 

fmass92

Senior Member
I've owned all lightweight, medium weight and heavy duty cymbal stands at one point.

When I first got my drums last year, I bought all Sound Percussion boom stands for $40 a pop. I only used one as an actual boom and it was to hold my A Custom 22" Ping Ride, which is a pretty heavy cymbal. As long as I kept a leg under where the cymbal was, it seemed to hold it pretty decently, however this made it difficult to get it in a comfortable position for me. I used the other stands (as straights) to hold up a 16" Crash, 18" Crash and 18" China. The stands never really moved on the ground (except the china occasionally) but when you hit the cymbal with a decent amount of force, the stand would shake a little, but I guess it wasn't a really a problem.

Next, I got an awesome deal on 3 Yamaha CS-865 boom stands and sold my SP stands. I used them to hold a 18" crash, 19" crash, and 21" ride. They all did their job perfectly. Never really budged and didn't wobble. The stand holding the ride was a little shaky sometimes when I crashed on it hard, but never tipped or anything.

Then, I was supposed to go on tour with a band this summer to fill in for their drummer, and I knew I would be setting up and tearing down my kit a lot, so I figured it would be smart to get "heavy duty" hardware and sold all my other stands (thank you Craigslist) and bought 4 DW 9000 boom stands. I also wanted memory locks which the Yamaha's didn't have. These also all do their job perfectly. I use them all as far-reaching booms to hold up a 18" crash, 19" crash and either a 21" or 22" ride. The fourth stand is used as a straight stand to hold a 20" crash and I also have a clamp and boom arm attached (not DW) to hold an 18" china. Turns out the band no longer needed a fill-in and I spent all that money for nothing... -_-

After going from the very bottom to the very top, I can easily say that unless you have extremely heavy cymbals, lightweight or medium-weight hardware will probably get the job done 9/10 times. However, the bells and whistles of the higher end stands make them a little bit more convenient and easier to use. So, if memory locks and "toothless" tilters aren't all that important to you, and your not carrying around 20" Medium crashes extended as far as the boom-arm will go, go either light- or medium-weight. You'll save a lot of money and a lot of time.
 

BillBachman

Gold Member
I'm all for light to medium hardware. If you're not knocking over drums and cymbal than you don't need to lug around a heavy hardware bag/case.

It just has to work.
 

BradGunnerSGT

Silver Member
I currently play in a cover band and we gig about every other weekend on average. Sometimes more and sometimes less. I've been using a Gibraltar rack for the last 3+ years and am thinking of switching to stands. Does anyone have any experience with the Medium weight hardware such as the Gibraltar 6600 series? Is it sturdy enough? I would not consider myself a heavy hitter. Thanks for any input. I've already done searches for this and haven't really found a good review or answer.

I was in your place a few months ago, had a rack forever and wanted to change things up a bit and switch to stands while still keeping the ease of setting up that a rack gives you.

What I did was take my existing rack components and cut them down to make one of these "stealth racks" for the right side of my kit. I also removed the RIMS-style tom mount and switched to a snare stand for my "mounted" 12" tom. I have a variety of different cymbal stands but I decided for uniformity to go ahead and buy 2 SP cymbal boom stands for my cymbals on the left of my kit (one between the tom and hi-hat, and one on the other side of the hi-hat. They are cheap and they are a nice medium weight (durability-/quality-wise) stand while also being physically lighter than Gibraltar or other name-brand stands.

Eventually, I'll replace my existing cymbal booms that are on the side rack with the same booms built into the SP stands. I like the hideaway feature that can turn the boom stand into a straight stand.
 

BrewBillfold

Silver Member
I currently play in a cover band and we gig about every other weekend on average. Sometimes more and sometimes less. I've been using a Gibraltar rack for the last 3+ years and am thinking of switching to stands. Does anyone have any experience with the Medium weight hardware such as the Gibraltar 6600 series? Is it sturdy enough? I would not consider myself a heavy hitter. Thanks for any input. I've already done searches for this and haven't really found a good review or answer.
I used to primarily use hardware like this stuff: http://www.willoughcraftdrums.com/azaz3.jpg --that was standard, and really the best available for awhile. It was fine. I think a lot of the hardware available now is on the overkill side. It's sure impressive from a design standpoint, but I don't really think it's necessary. Players like Keith Moon, Ginger Baker, Mitch Mitchell, etc. used stands like the picture I referenced. Most folks do not play heavier than those guys did.

Probably the biggest advantage with the overkill stuff is that it holds up better if you're doing constant roadwork and you've got roadies who throw your stuff around, lol.
 

Eman101

Member
I have, amongst other items, two of the Gibraltar 5000 series boom stands in my use. And I have never had any issue with them. SO I would assume the 6000 series will be just as good, if not better.

I have a coupel of heavy duty Pearl stands, and while I think Pearl makes the best hardware around, the sheer weight of the stands is a pain. Every time I pick up my hardware bag I feel lie my back is going to break! Unless you're playing on a very wobbly stage, or outside in a blizzard, you shouldn't need heavy duty hardware like that. On the other hand, of course, once you have it, it will last forever.
 

mrbling

Silver Member
im mixed i guess, i currently have 3 Bigdog booms that they consider heavy duty but compared to the DWs and Pearls of this world they would easily be classified as medium which is enough. i also have 1 light weight single braced yamaha 700 straight stand for my china and it holds up fine. but all the bells and whistles of the higher end stuff especially DW makes me want some of them.

just wish they would put the toothless tilters on their 5000 series stuff, but then that would pretty much make the 9000 stuff obsolete
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
just wish they would put the toothless tilters on their 5000 series stuff, but then that would pretty much make the 9000 stuff obsolete
They used too. I have some of those stands & they had an "L" designation after the model number. It was discontinued about a year ago. They turned the slightly smaller tube gear into the 5000 series.

The "L" weight stands are the same tubing as what is on the 7000 series single braced stuff.
It is PLENTY sturdy for about any application and could have a couple things boomed off of one no problem.

The 6000 stuff holds up GREAT even for my 24" ride (that I crash) and my 20 & 21" crashes. I really like the snare stand for my tom also.
The case is SO much lighter too. I don't dread bringing it up my basement stairs (walk-out, very cool) anymore since it's no problem with the light stands.
 
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Crazy8s

Guest
Your hardware needs to be heavy duty enough so that your stuff doesn't fall apart on stage. It would be terribly embarrassing if your stuff falls over during your set. Is it more embarrassing to have your stuff fall over at the gig than to have to haul around an extra 10 pounds of gear?

I am not a super hard hitter, but I am not about to embarrass myself on stage by having my stuff fall over. Unless, of course, I throw them over...usually at the guitar player or singer...then it is just embarrassing for them! :)
 

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
Honestly, the feeling of a crash being mounted on a Pearl 900 straight stand is just awesome. Sturdiest thing I've ever felt. Confidence is very important, so go with stuff you're sure isn't going to fail on you any time soon. It may be heavier and more of a "hassle" to move, but that creates opportunities for exercise.

Really, the trade-off for heavier hardware is just a silly thing to worry about.
 

KarlCrafton

Platinum Member
Your hardware needs to be heavy duty enough so that your stuff doesn't fall apart on stage. It would be terribly embarrassing if your stuff falls over during your set. Is it more embarrassing to have your stuff fall over at the gig than to have to haul around an extra 10 pounds of gear?

I am not a super hard hitter, but I am not about to embarrass myself on stage by having my stuff fall over.
I totally agree with the first part. I can assure you that if I didn't think the stuff was sturdy enough I would not use it. I had my doubts too, before I actually got one.
2 years ago I was using all double braced heavy stands.

I do play hard in one band (lighter in the others), and this stuff is going nowhere.

There is NO WAY someone would get a 7000 single braced stand to tip over without total abuse or just being a dumba**....which of course can happen...

The difference between 3 7000 straights and 3 6000 straights is around 6-7lbs., give or take.
If someone likes their cymbals eye level or higher, then the flat base stuff is not the best idea.
Mine are lower, and the FB stuff is perfectly fine when I really dig in. Even with the 20, 21, 22 or 24" cymbals that I like to use.
 
I'm looking into DW 9000 series boom stands now, probably 3 of them, and probably looking to make the purchase in the next week or so. Maybe some folks who use them could shed some light on a few questions I have about those compared to the Medium-grade stuff that I use now (Pacific, double braced, approx 50 dollars per stand).

I find that with my Pacifics that are about 5-7 years old there is some rust on the tubing (i.e. its no longer super smooth chrome) and at the joints on the boom arm. I also find that the tubing gets kind of dented from constant tightening and loosening. And then finally I find that the boom arms have a little "give" in them, that is, even when all the wingnuts are tightened the boom arm can still shake a little bit up and down.

These are the reasons I'm pursuing the 9000 stuff. That and those black levers to loosen the joint look amazing. I'm always hurting my fingers trying to tighten and loosen those wingnuts. The memory locks will be great too. Just a question on those though. Is the point of the memory locks to completely take apart the stand (when transporting) so that the base tube is separated from the top tube? Then you stick it back it and the memory lock lets you know where to stop?
 

Zickosdrummer

Senior Member
I have flat base Ludwig cympal stands that I have had for 40 years. I have a 22" A. that I can put on there and it holds it just fine. I prefer the lighter hardware because it takes up less room in my cases and I can cary it (I'm no spring chicken). I'm also pretty careful with my gear. Boom stands are another matter entirely. If you are going to use them they should be pretty substantial.
 
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