Maple Steambent Snare

brianbags

Member
Hi guys, I'm thinking about purchasing Tre Cool's Dookie snare. It's a bit pricey, around 3k, so I'm just trying to get some information on the snare itself so I can determine how much money is going towards quality versus how much towards the "limited edition" part. The snare is "maple steam bent" . Anyone know anything about this type of snare?

 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
Hi guys, I'm thinking about purchasing Tre Cool's Dookie snare. It's a bit pricey, around 3k, so I'm just trying to get some information on the snare itself so I can determine how much money is going towards quality versus how much towards the "limited edition" part. The snare is "maple steam bent" . Anyone know anything about this type of snare?


You could make your own for a lot less, sans badge, but WTH.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I know quite a bit about steam bent drums.

I'm assuming you mean 3k $USD? Standard tube lugs aren't that much. Hoops are quite expensive. Standard steam bent shell, not exactly cheap, or easy to do. You can buy a basic one from Vaughncraft for about $150. There's obviously quite a bit of work in the paint job, & time is money. That's where the value is, although it's probably a very nice drum too. Lets's put it in perspective with alternative options. With those hoops, you could secure a superb quality steam bent maple drum for around $1,300, & something extraordinary for under $1,500, & I'm being generous. So, you're paying about $1,700 for the paint job & whatever kudos you think goes with the offer. I'm thinking the artist has probably appropriated a charge too.
 

brianbags

Member
I know quite a bit about steam bent drums.

I'm assuming you mean 3k $USD? Standard tube lugs aren't that much. Hoops are quite expensive. Standard steam bent shell, not exactly cheap, or easy to do. You can buy a basic one from Vaughncraft for about $150. There's obviously quite a bit of work in the paint job, & time is money. That's where the value is, although it's probably a very nice drum too. Lets's put it in perspective with alternative options. With those hoops, you could secure a superb quality steam bent maple drum for around $1,300, & something extraordinary for under $1,500, & I'm being generous. So, you're paying about $1,700 for the paint job & whatever kudos you think goes with the offer. I'm thinking the artist has probably appropriated a charge too.
Thanks for the info. Yes, USD. The company is saying it's the same snare Tre used to record Dookie, but I can't find which snare he used to record that, just to double check them.

So you can't really tell its quality from its description? It's safe to say I'm spending $1500 on design? Thing is they're only making 20 of these so I don't know how much bargaining leverage I have.. (already brought it down from $3100 plus shipping ($35) to $2900 shipped)
 
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Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Really, it's all down to how much you want that actual drum. The value is how you perceive it. It's a great quality drum for sure. Yes, you could get the same quality & the same sound for half the money, but that's not really what you're buying. Especially if you're a fan of the artist, it could mean so much more to you. It's a purchase of the heart, not a purchase of the head.

Remember, so long as you see strong value in it's signature status, the joy of ownership continues long after the price is forgotten.
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Thanks for the info. Yes, USD. The company is saying it's the same snare Tre used to record Dookie, but I can't find which snare he used to record that, just to double check them.

So you can't really tell its quality from its description? It's safe to say I'm spending $1500 on design? Thing is they're only making 20 of these so I don't know how much bargaining leverage I have.. (already brought it down from $3100 plus shipping ($35) to $2900 shipped)
That's just way too much money,for a snare that has no provenance as to have actually belonged to Tre.Even if was his personal snare,that he actually used to record the album.....so what.

Expensive drums like that are usually bought with investment in mind: something that will apperciate in value.I've been doing this drum stuff for quite a while now,and honestly,I don't see that drums as a money maker...at all.No offence,but that's not a 3K snare drum.

If you really want to buy a great steambent snare,buy a Guru,or a vintage Slingerland Radio King..that WILL go up in value.

Steve B
 

Red Menace

Platinum Member
Remember, so long as you see strong value in it's signature status, the joy of ownership continues long after the price is forgotten.
I'm kind of the opposite, I enjoy my gear more if I scored it for cheap. I then have my drums modified to suit my tastes. I'm kind cheap though.

OP, is this something you actually have the funds to buy or are you just dreaming aloud? Not trying to be funny, I have a good job and make good money but that is not something I could drop on a snare. I didn't spend 3k for my kits and snares combined. Like I said, tightwad...
 

brianbags

Member
I'm kind of the opposite, I enjoy my gear more if I scored it for cheap. I then have my drums modified to suit my tastes. I'm kind cheap though.

OP, is this something you actually have the funds to buy or are you just dreaming aloud? Not trying to be funny, I have a good job and make good money but that is not something I could drop on a snare. I didn't spend 3k for my kits and snares combined. Like I said, tightwad...
I have the funds to buy it. I don't take a purchase like this lightly (and have never done anything like this), with it only being one drum and all...but I'm in college and working and figure it could be a good investment.

With that being said I do feel like that is a really high price point for one drum. It's signed and signaturefied, plus Tre Cool was one of the first drummers I ever learned to play so I do value that a lot in making a decision. Plus I really like Green Day haha. I'll just have to think about it...

tamadrm, it's not the same exact snare Tre used to record Dookie. It's a replica, and they made 20 of them.
 

steadypocket

Gold Member
This is not an an investment, it is a collectible. Big difference. This drum likely won't appreciate all that much in value, and its resale market is limited to die hard Green Day fans. As pointed out there are surely better built, and better sounding, snares at half the price.

So, with all that said, if the drum has value to you (to the tune of three large), well, that is all that matters. I just think it is foolhardy to assume this drum will hold its value, or appreciate, over the years. Collectibles are often a bad investment. Won't bore you with how much I spent on baseball cards in the early 90s. Many of those rare cards aren't worth the cardboard they're printed on.

Get it if you love it. You'd have something unique that only a handful of others would own. Don't get it if you're looking for an an investment.
 

BGH

Gold Member
I'm sorry, I just don't see this. Did I miss something, or is it not the case that you don't even know who is building these snares? It would also be interesting to know what other gear you have. For $3000 you could get a nice steambent snare from a well known and respected drum maker and purchase a high quality kit or just save the extra cash. I remember my college days; I didn't have this kind of money to spend. But if I did (and if you do, cool) it wouldn't have been on a snare drum. I had too many other things that I could have bought that would have enhanced my life in a more necessary way.

Almost every older guy here is telling you that this would not be a good investment. Maybe you should by some mutual funds instead, if that's what you are looking for. Everyone on this forum has drummers they idolized in their early years. I hardly ever hear of someone making a purchase like this. When I see any well know artist's gear listed on eBay for example (with a high asking price premium) the gear just sits there and sits there - these things don't commonly get bought when they have these high premiums. Not many folks have the discretionary funds for these kind of purchases. That's why its a bad investment. The pool of buyers down the road will be too limited. An item is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it!
 

brianbags

Member
This is not an an investment, it is a collectible. Big difference. This drum likely won't appreciate all that much in value, and its resale market is limited to die hard Green Day fans. As pointed out there are surely better built, and better sounding, snares at half the price.

So, with all that said, if the drum has value to you (to the tune of three large), well, that is all that matters. I just think it is foolhardy to assume this drum will hold its value, or appreciate, over the years. Collectibles are often a bad investment. Won't bore you with how much I spent on baseball cards in the early 90s. Many of those rare cards aren't worth the cardboard they're printed on.

Get it if you love it. You'd have something unique that only a handful of others would own. Don't get it if you're looking for an an investment.
You're right, it would be more of a very hopeful investment. I've thought about how it could be worth money in 20 years, but you never really know. It probably won't be. But in the meantime, I could enjoy it as a collectible item. It will also be an upgrade from my Pork Pie black brass snare.

I'm sorry, I just don't see this. Did I miss something, or is it not the case that you don't even know who is building these snares? It would also be interesting to know what other gear you have. For $3000 you could get a nice steambent snare from a well known and respected drum maker and purchase a high quality kit or just save the extra cash. I remember my college days; I didn't have this kind of money to spend. But if I did (and if you do, cool) it wouldn't have been on a snare drum. I had too many other things that I could have bought that would have enhanced my life in a more necessary way.

Almost every older guy here is telling you that this would not be a good investment. Maybe you should by some mutual funds instead, if that's what you are looking for. Everyone on this forum has drummers they idolized in their early years. I hardly ever hear of someone making a purchase like this. When I see any well know artist's gear listed on eBay for example (with a high asking price premium) the gear just sits there and sits there - these things don't commonly get bought when they have these high premiums. Not many folks have the discretionary funds for these kind of purchases. That's why its a bad investment. The pool of buyers down the road will be too limited. An item is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it!
SJC is making it, if that's what you mean. When you put it that way...my Ludwig Centennial only cost $1100 I think. For a snare, 24" bass, and 13", 16" and 18" toms. Cymbals add up too, but 3k for a one snare drum is insane in comparison. I could just buy a really nice DW or something with this kind of money.

I completely understand what you're saying about its resale value, if any. I think I'm leaning towards a big price cut now, or no buy. I'm just really curious to know how many they've sold...

I have invested in mutual funds, btw
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Here is my Vaughncraft maple Steam Bent snare, before and after a recent re-wrap. It is not a signature snare with a fancy paint job but I also paid 250.00 for it when it was 1 year old. To pay 3000.00 for a snare when that could buy an entire kit, a great kit, seems little silly. I would be happy I didn't buy one of the 30.
 

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motleyh

Senior Member
Hi guys, I'm thinking about purchasing Tre Cool's Dookie snare. It's a bit pricey, around 3k, so I'm just trying to get some information on the snare itself so I can determine how much money is going towards quality versus how much towards the "limited edition" part. The snare is "maple steam bent" . Anyone know anything about this type of snare?
Very nice drum -- steambent maple with diecasts is one of my favorites. That being said, about 1/4 to 1/3 of the money is going toward quality while 65% to 75% is going toward the "limited edition" part -- artwork and collectability.

As others have said, there are a myriad of investments that would give you a better return.

If you want to put it on a shelf to enjoy owning it, buy it. If you want to play it because of its performance quality, you could get 3 or 4 drums of comparable quality for the price of this one. If you want to make your investment grow over the next 20 years, you'd be wiser to put the money in the bank.
 

brianbags

Member
Alright guys, I went through with it. We brought it down to $2695, so I just couldn't resist. Ask me in ten years if this was a good decision haha.

Should I be concerned that there is no warranty on this? I don't know how warranties on drums work, I've never had a problem with my drums. I didn't make the payment yet by the way.


Also, thanks for all your advice. It just came down to the fact that it will be a special collectible item for me. Plus a really high quality new snare.
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
DO NOT BUY THAT DRUM!!!!! Collectable is never defined by rarity alone. If no one is willing to pay that much for that drum then it is by definition NOT COLLECTABLE! If you but this drum you will not be able to get rid of it. It's value will plummet immediately upon transaction. Be smart. Collectors items gain value over time. Better quality, higher value steambent snares are available. Ask the right questions. Who made this drum (SJC did not)? What other companys make these drums? Which of these companys is considered the best? What is the cost/re-sale value of this drum? What is the cost/re-sale value of other companies products? Johnny Craviotto makes arguably the best steambent snares in the world at half that price. If you're buying this to put on the wall then a vintage Black Beauty will be worth more in ten years. If you're buying it to play then there are better drums out there. Plus it's just plain ugly.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
Is there a warranty? Is there a certificate of authenticity? How do you know Tre played that drum if there are 20 of them. To imagine the entire kit of my dreams could be bought for the price of one snare. 150.00 for the shell, 150.00 for the hardware and 2000.00 for being a fanboy. A student with that much cash. Are you majoring in finance? I think the 2600.00 you paid will be the most that drum is ever going to be worth, even with inflation.

I found this online""""" The SJC team went above and beyond by getting ahold of the actual snare used on the recording to ensure the most genuine product possible.""" so does that mean that the 20 are copies of the actual drum he used?
 

BGH

Gold Member
Ok, go easy on the lad. There are those in this world who have unlimited resources. I assume brianbags is in that category. I'm pretty sure its known that these are 20 copies of the original drum. Its not a drum played by Tre. If he can afford it, and wants it, well why not? Families go on vacations and spend thousands of dollars and have nothing to show for it but some photos.

Is it a smart financial move? Is it a good investment? No. But, if it makes him happy and he can afford it, its worth it to him. Would I have bought one? No.

I would just say this to brianbags: Either play it or put it on a shelf. Don't do both. In other words, your statement ' It just came down to the fact that it will be a special collectible item for me. Plus a really high quality new snare,' makes no sense. The quality is only important if you are going to play it. If you are going to 'collect' it, don't play it. As soon as you touch it, the value goes down 50% at least. Don't think of it as a high quality snare to play, if it is a collectible to you. In that case, put it on a shelf in a clear plastic bag and don't touch it. That's your only prayer of it being worth anything in future years. In fact, I would try to avoid getting any fingerprints on it, if you expect it to hold its value. Handle it only with gloves on, seriously.
 
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T

The SunDog

Guest
OK ,OK maybe i was a little harsh. Enjoy your new drum. It will sound incredible. Go to you tube and look up similar snares and you will find that 14x7 steambent maple is among the finest sounding snares in the world. Just try not fall for the new cool. SJC orders its shells from the Keller Corp. just like hundreds upon hundreds of "custom drum shops. Except for their acrylic shells which they order from RCI. That is not a bad thing just a reality. My DW kit is from '97 and is made with Keller shells
 
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