Making getting around the kit easier ...

schist

Silver Member
Hey all,

I'd just like to post an exercise I've written for facilitating travelling around the entire kit, and I don't just mean around the toms (I believe I already have an exercise written for that somewhere ...).

Basically, you pick the highest possible point on your drumkit (be that a crash cymbal, high china cymbal etc.), your snare and the furthest possible point on your drumkit (so maybe low floor tom) and play 16th-notes between these with each hand.

So, you might have:

High Point / Snare / Far Point / Snare with your right hand for 4 measures, then the same with your left, and alternate between the two for 2 - 5 minutes.

Naturally, start this exercise slow (so perhaps 40BPM 16ths, or even slower) and do not up the tempo till you can get between each point cleanly and clearly. The final tempo can be whatever you want it to be - if you can do this cleanly at 100BPM, you will have people's jaw's dropping during solos/fills etc. If you can do this at 120BPM, you might as well add 'Donati' to your name!

So yeah, I suggest giving it a try.

Cheers

- Adam
 

IPC

Member
Thanks Alot I'll give this a try today at practice. This comes as a good time, I've been looking for excercises to help me get around the kit better.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Thanks Alot I'll give this a try today at practice. This comes as a good time, I've been looking for excercises to help me get around the kit better.
It's a great exercise. If you're looking for an easy-to-use course of study focussed on exactly this problem, check out Rod Morgenstein's Drumset Warm Ups. It's a treasure trove of exercises designed to get you flying around the kit with accuracy and control. I've used it myself and found that my students get a lot out of it.
 

IPC

Member
Looks great Boomka, whenever I get some cash I think I'll pick this up. Lately I've been investing alot of time into technique and musicality, but I think its the right time to start working more at this vital skill set. Thanks to you both for the helpful advice.
 

Spreggy

Silver Member
It's a great exercise. If you're looking for an easy-to-use course of study focussed on exactly this problem, check out Rod Morgenstein's Drumset Warm Ups. It's a treasure trove of exercises designed to get you flying around the kit with accuracy and control. I've used it myself and found that my students get a lot out of it.
+1, great book, just packed with useful stuff.
 

sciomako

Silver Member
It's a great exercise. If you're looking for an easy-to-use course of study focussed on exactly this problem, check out Rod Morgenstein's Drumset Warm Ups. It's a treasure trove of exercises designed to get you flying around the kit with accuracy and control. I've used it myself and found that my students get a lot out of it.
Hi Boomka,

I have Morgenstein's book but not sure how to integrate its exercises into my practices mainly because of its sheer volume. Not sure if I have to do it cover to cover and how I judge I can move to the next exercise. Any advice is appreciated.
 

Wavelength

Platinum Member
Hi Boomka,

I have Morgenstein's book but not sure how to integrate its exercises into my practices mainly because of its sheer volume. Not sure if I have to do it cover to cover and how I judge I can move to the next exercise. Any advice is appreciated.
Try playing one new page every day, and always review the previous material. The point isn't to master one exercise or one page before moving on. Start at a slow tempo, gradually speed up and come back down.
 

Boomka

Platinum Member
Hi Boomka,

I have Morgenstein's book but not sure how to integrate its exercises into my practices mainly because of its sheer volume. Not sure if I have to do it cover to cover and how I judge I can move to the next exercise. Any advice is appreciated.
Just like you would a big meal; one morsel at a time. The way I see them, they're "Warm Ups" in the sense that you can pick a few of them and work on them until you feel you've gotten some results from them, then move on to others. And you can pick ones that pinpoint aspects of your movements around the kit that you'd like to work on. I don't think the book really needs to be worked on sequentially, though there is a certain logic to it. For instance, the first few pages are all about accuracy and economy: i.e. learning to pick out the various voices on the kit in any order with either hand. Once you've done that, you'll find that moving your hands around the kit in tandem will become much easier. Of course, many of the later exercises build on that. I think of it much like Stick Control: it's not like you get to a certain place and say, "well that's that, done and dusted." Rather, I use it both for technique building and maintenance.

But here's how I give it to my students. Start on the first page. Take the first column of exercises and work on them daily for a few minutes each. Do the Stick Control thing and do each one (with each hand) at least 20 times. Give it a week and then move on to the next column. You can tackle a whole page if you've got the time. But, doing them the first way might take 20-25 minutes. I also recommend trying a gradual Open-Closed-Open style, pushing your tempo limit, but always striving for accuracy and control (follow his instructions) and, above all, relaxed flowing movements minimizing unneeded motion. Wax on, wax off (You'll see what I mean).

What I found was that - beginning with those very first exercises - when I went on to practicing other stuff after warming up with this material, there was an immediate change in the fluidity of my motions around the kit. The feedback was instantaneous, and that's what I love about it.

Warning: Drumset Warm Ups May Be Addictive
 
Last edited:

sciomako

Silver Member
Thanks, Wavelength and Boomka.

Interestingly you brought up open-closed-open approach. I never do this on a regular basis, neither on the kit nor on a practice pad. I always use a metronome. When I want to increase the tempo, I simply stop, change the metronome and restart.

But I think I can understand the theory behind open-closed-open, why it is beneficial as a drill: train the hands to do micro speed adjustments smoothly as this is what we do all the time when maintaining the tempo.

p.s. Adam, I hope you don't mind I hijacked your thread.
 

ermghoti

Silver Member
High Point / Snare / Far Point / Snare with your right hand for 4 measures, then the same with your left, and alternate between the two for 2 - 5 minutes.
Cool, and adheres to KISS, good idea! I would add, at a glance, that making it a three-note pattern turns it into a brutal crossover exercise.
 
B

BigSteve

Guest
Glad I saw this thread, Thanks Boomka and the OP! I went on Amazon and checked out
"Rod Morgenstein's Drumset Warm Ups" and ordered it after checking out the first few pages. I have a little routine of my own for warm ups and fluidity but it doesn't have much structure. I'll be looking forward to trying these routines
 
Top