Ludwig Standard Kit

larryace

"Uncle Larry" - Administrator
Staff member
You are off by a couple of decades.

Classic Maples came out in the mid 90's.

Standards were from 68 -82 so they used the same shells that Ludwig was making at the time so that would be three ply with rerings up until '78 or so or until they ran out of three ply shells. Then it was four ply shells.
Whoops, my bad. I meant the shells Ludwig used for their top end drums at the time
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
So....same shells, but different hardware? Those look like Rocker lugs.


Also - what were the 3 ply/re-ring shells with the regular lugs called at that time - Classic?, Super Classic?, or something else.
 
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lefty2

Platinum Member
I grew up playing a 68 five pc Standard kit in gold strata. I sold them in 82 for $500 and replaced them with an SL series kit 4ply poplar.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
So....same shells, but different hardware? Those look like Rocker lugs.


Also - what were the 3 ply/re-ring shells with the regular lugs called at that time - Classic?, Super Classic?, or something else.

Actually, Rockers inherited the Standard lug.

Prior to Ludwig introducing the thin 4-ply maple/poplar shell in 1988 their regular drums didn't have seperate lines; they were just...Ludwig drums. In 1988 they called the 4-ply shells Super Classic and the 6-ply shells were called Classic. Those two shell options ran side by side until the late 90s (I think) when they briefly went to a 9-ply all maple shell before changing to the 7-ply Classic Maple shell.
 

pocket player

Junior Member
Ludwig Standard Question are the shells in this video granular fiberglass which they apear to be or are they wood shells with a fiber glass coating that ludwig called granitone ???? THanks
 

acsunda

Well-known Member
Ludwig Standard Question are the shells in this video granular fiberglass which they apear to be or are they wood shells with a fiber glass coating that ludwig called granitone ???? THanks
I don’t believe Ludwig ever made fiberglass shells (I think maybe it was Pearl that spearheaded fiberglass drums). And I’m pretty sure the granitone coating was just a paint.
 
Am I the only one who likes those lugs and badges more than the regular Ludwigs? They look more elegant and I like the "retro futuristic" look they aimed for back then. :)
The wrap is also really cool - neither too flashy, nor too bland.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Congrats on your kit! Standards have been my... well, Standard for going on ten years now.
 

Thin Shell

Active Member
Ludwig Standard Question are the shells in this video granular fiberglass which they apear to be or are they wood shells with a fiber glass coating that ludwig called granitone ???? THanks
The shells are the garden variety three ply shells that they used on all of their drums. They were Mahogany - Poplar - Maple but some could have been Mahogany - Poplar - Mahogany early on. They had solid, steam bent Maple rerings.

The finish was what is commonly referred to as trunk paint. It was a splatter paint with a grey base, and white and black specks and was commonly used as the finish for the trunk in many American cars in the 50's and 60's.


Most American drum companies used paint of some sort during the 50's - 70's. Gretsch used their silver fence paint. Ludwig first used the White gloss house paint, a brief period of clear finished interiors and then the trunk paint before doing away with it entirely on the top line drums. They continued to use it on the Rockers and Standards into the 80's. Rogers used a flat grey paint and then went to the trunk paint. Slingerland used a light brown paint during a period in the 60's. Camco used white house paint for a while.

People weren't obsessed with what woods drums were made from back then and since most drums were double headed, no one would ever see the inside so it was easiest to just paint the interiors.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Am I the only one who likes those lugs and badges more than the regular Ludwigs? They look more elegant and I like the "retro futuristic" look they aimed for back then. :)
The wrap is also really cool - neither too flashy, nor too bland.
I really like the Standard badge but I have a love/hate relationship with the lugs. I think they look nice but the lugs are thinner and generally lesser quality castings when compared to the thicker wall Classic lugs, which make them especially prone to cracking and breaking. I've refurbished a lot of Rocker drums and had so many problems with broken lugs I ended up just replacing them with Classics. Which leads to the second issue I have; the regular size Standard/Rocker lug is the same hole spacing as a large Classic lug, but the bass drum lugs are a completely unique hole spacing, so there is no drop-in replacement.
 

pocket player

Junior Member
The shells are the garden variety three ply shells that they used on all of their drums. They were Mahogany - Poplar - Maple but some could have been Mahogany - Poplar - Mahogany early on. They had solid, steam bent Maple rerings.

The finish was what is commonly referred to as trunk paint. It was a splatter paint with a grey base, and white and black specks and was commonly used as the finish for the trunk in many American cars in the 50's and 60's.


Most American drum companies used paint of some sort during the 50's - 70's. Gretsch used their silver fence paint. Ludwig first used the White gloss house paint, a brief period of clear finished interiors and then the trunk paint before doing away with it entirely on the top line drums. They continued to use it on the Rockers and Standards into the 80's. Rogers used a flat grey paint and then went to the trunk paint. Slingerland used a light brown paint during a period in the 60's. Camco used white house paint for a while.

People weren't obsessed with what woods drums were made from back then and since most drums were double headed, no one would ever see the inside so it was easiest to just paint the interiors.
thanks for your info,that answers many questions
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Actually, Rockers inherited the Standard lug.

Prior to Ludwig introducing the thin 4-ply maple/poplar shell in 1988 their regular drums didn't have seperate lines; they were just...Ludwig drums. In 1988 they called the 4-ply shells Super Classic and the 6-ply shells were called Classic. Those two shell options ran side by side until the late 90s (I think) when they briefly went to a 9-ply all maple shell before changing to the 7-ply Classic Maple shell.

Thanks for the info.

What I'm getting from it is that prior to 1988 all the shells were 3 ply with rings - is that about right?
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Thanks for the info.

What I'm getting from it is that prior to 1988 all the shells were 3 ply with rings - is that about right?
Prior to 1988 all shells were 6-ply poplar/maple. Ludwig changed from the 3-ply w/ re-ring to 6-ply straight shell around 1975.
 
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