Ludwig factory Contact Assistance.

Mines2000

Member
I have a 10 Piece kit with a mix of shells from the late 60's (Keystone Badges) as well as early 70's (Blue and Olive badges). They were all silver sparkle but since they were different years the color did not match throughout. This kit has 26" bass, 8" and 10" Melodic Toms, 14" and 16" Floor Toms, 12",13",14",15" Mounted Toms. I removed all of the hardware and removed most of the covering in an attempt to refinish and recover OR stain and varnish. I did not realize the undertaking I assumed and unfortunately due to finances as well as lack of resources I had to abandon the project. If anyone has a contact at Ludwig that I may appeal to their sense of history, nostalgia as well as longevity of their classic shells that are in great shape and should be revitalized. I'm hoping they could offer to sand and recover the shells to preserve this kit for myself and future generations of my family. EZ
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I haven't known the company to work on their vintage gear. There are several great builders who do excellent work on old drums, and Jack Lawton is probably the most respected in terms of the Ludwig brand.

 

Mines2000

Member
I haven't known the company to work on their vintage gear. There are several great builders who do excellent work on old drums, and Jack Lawton is probably the most respected in terms of the Ludwig brand.

I'm sure they don't usually but I was hoping to appeal to their sense of nostalgia in preserving a vintage product. For their factory this would be easy project. I'm not sure Jack would take on this project pro bono.. I will contact him though and see what he has to say. Thank you very much for your response.. EZ
 
Last edited:

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I have a lot of experience using Precision Drum for shell cutting and bearing edge work and I'd trust them with any project they'd be willing to undertake.

That said, wrap removal from vintage Ludwig shells (because they use a $#!T of glue) was the one job I asked about that they turned down.
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
I'm sure they don't usually but I was hoping to appeal to their sense of nostalgia in preserving a vintage product. For their factory this would be easy project. I'm not sure Jack would take on this project pro bono.. I will contact him though and see what he has to say. Thank you very much for your response.. EZ
Wait... you want this done pro bono?
 

Mines2000

Member
I have a lot of experience using Precision Drum for shell cutting and bearing edge work and I'd trust them with any project they'd be willing to undertake.

That said, wrap removal from vintage Ludwig shells (because they use a $#!T of glue) was the one job I asked about that they turned down.
I'll keep them in mind.. except for the (2) Melodic Toms all the wraps have been removed. Thank you for the reply. EZ
 

Mines2000

Member
Wait... you want this done pro bono?
Unfortunately I'm not in a position to handle this financially. It's the main reason I wanted to contact Ludwig directly in hopes I could appeal to their sense of Nostalgia in preserving one of their own Vintage Products.. It's a kit that's been in my family (Cousin since the 70's) and now myself for the past 28 years. I wouldn't ask an independant to foot the bill for something like this.. EZ
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I'm sure they don't usually but I was hoping to appeal to their sense of nostalgia in preserving a vintage product. For their factory this would be easy project. I'm not sure Jack would take on this project pro bono.. I will contact him though and see what he has to say. Thank you very much for your response.. EZ
There are a number of persons in the company that value the vintage aspect of the brand, but the factory isn't really set up for refurbishing. They create shells from scratch, wrap/edge/drill them, and attach hardware & heads. There are a couple of employees with the vintage bug who do outside work, but I don't think they'd do just for the love - your project is pretty labor intensive.

By the same token, don't turn it over to someone for free just because they're ambitious and want to experiment. You need a pro to do the job, I'd estimate it's $1500 or more.

Bermuda
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Unrealistic expectations.

People don't take on a project like that lightly - at least not a second time. ;)

If you really want to see it done, work on it a little at a time, and think of it as a very long term undertaking.
 

Mines2000

Member
There are a number of persons in the company that value the vintage aspect of the brand, but the factory isn't really set up for refurbishing. They create shells from scratch, wrap/edge/drill them, and attach hardware & heads. There are a couple of employees with the vintage bug who do outside work, but I don't think they'd do just for the love - your project is pretty labor intensive.

By the same token, don't turn it over to someone for free just because they're ambitious and want to experiment. You need a pro to do the job, I'd estimate it's $1500 or more.

Bermuda
I appreciate your insight on this matter.. I'm not sure how the factory is set up but I did imagine each stage of production being its own entity where they could isolate this work. Honestly the only thing I could do is a barter. I have a 4 piece Rocker Kit in all white 24" Bass, 8" & 10" Mounted Tom and 14" Floor Tom. It was part of a larger kit that was broken up into 2 Kits.. Unfortunately I do not have (Other than the bass Tom Mount) any cymbal or HH stands. I just took the drums because I had bought Pearl Cymbal Stands and a Tama Lever Glide HH Stands for the 10 Piece.
Yes, I would only let someone very knowledgeable handle this.. I figured it would be at least that much.. Thank you again.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
Perhaps I'm being blunt but the drum set is not museum material and the people you are reaching out to are business people so I feel like you're wasting your time.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I would never expect anyone to do this for free unless you were just going to turn around and give them the set after they were done.

I mean, removing the wrap should take a lot more time than resources. Maybe a heating gun and some sandpaper? If I were in your shoes, I'd set up some sort of little sound system in your area, listen to good music, and work on these a little at a time. Who knows? The work itself may be reward enough to clear your mind. Also after you are done, there will be a certain sense of pride you'll have. :)
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
With all due respect, it's naive to think that someone at Ludwig would care enough about a used set of their drums to refurbish them just because you asked them too. Maybe if you wanted to donate them to Ludwig they would take them. No one would give you the time of day IMO if you asked them to refurb your kit and return it to you free. Time for plan B.

What is plan B?
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
To the OP:

You mention Ludwig taking on the project for the nostalgia factor and that the drums have been in your family for a number of years. The nostalgia factor applies to you, not Ludwig. I appreciate your hopefulness but frankly, all they did was make the drums. It's a product they aren't sentimentally attached to. That's how manufacturing works. A company makes a product and puts it out there for use/consumption.

The machining and tools for refurbishment are different from those from manufacturing. Even when exponentially larger manufacturers such as GM, Ford, etc do a restoration project, most of the work is outsourced. I realize autos and drums are not the same thing but it applies as original manufacturing is a different business from restoration/refurbishment.

Either save the money to have someone else do it, find a way to trade for services, or enlist the help of other family members.

Sentimental value is rarely transferable, even with family members.
 

Mines2000

Member
To the OP:

You mention Ludwig taking on the project for the nostalgia factor and that the drums have been in your family for a number of years. The nostalgia factor applies to you, not Ludwig. I appreciate your hopefulness but frankly, all they did was make the drums. It's a product they aren't sentimentally attached to. That's how manufacturing works. A company makes a product and puts it out there for use/consumption.

The machining and tools for refurbishment are different from those from manufacturing. Even when exponentially larger manufacturers such as GM, Ford, etc do a restoration project, most of the work is outsourced. I realize autos and drums are not the same thing but it applies as original manufacturing is a different business from restoration/refurbishment.

Either save the money to have someone else do it, find a way to trade for services, or enlist the help of other family members.

Sentimental value is rarely transferable, even with family members.
Thank You.. Your comments are appreciated. I do believe though that musical instruments hold a closer place in people's hearts whether it's an owner or a manufacturer. maybe that's naive to think that way. I would imagine if I built something and it was still viable 50+ Years later it would make me feel a certain sentiment and if it was within my means (reasonably) I would do what I could to preserve it's continued longevity.

I put this out there with low expectations but also with a "You never know" attitude. EZ
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
Honestly, the drums sound really cool, and I think it's worth the effort to get the drums refinished, you'll just be doing the work yourself. Is there any help or advice you need to keep going?

I've unwrapped and refinished quite a few Ludwig Rockers over the years and I believe that it's more about time and patience and less about money, but if you spread out buying what you need, and just go one drum at a time it doesn't have to be too expensive. Depending on the exact condition of each drum and your desired outcome I'm confident you could do the rest of the work yourself for relatively little money. It sounds like you already have some emotional attachment to the drums; finishing the job yourself and getting these drums back into playing condition will only increase that attachment and you'll appreciate them even more.

Without a few more specifics (pictures of the drums in their current state would be a huge help) I'm guessing you'll need adhesive remover and an electric pad sander for most of the work. Depending on how the shells look consistency-wise might help you decide if you want to stain, paint an opaque color, or re-wrap, but paint and stain are significantly cheaper than wrap.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Thank You.. Your comments are appreciated. I do believe though that musical instruments hold a closer place in people's hearts whether it's an owner or a manufacturer. maybe that's naive to think that way. I would imagine if I built something and it was still viable 50+ Years later it would make me feel a certain sentiment and if it was within my means (reasonably) I would do what I could to preserve it's continued longevity.

I put this out there with low expectations but also with a "You never know" attitude. EZ
Maybe this will help. I work in a plant that produces musical gear. 99% of the people I work with aren't musicians. They don't care what they build, sand, paint, or assemble. It's just a job. You are asking people to care about your particular item. In reality, these people already have enough to do during the day with the orders they must fill. They just want to do their jobs and go home to their loved ones. That is what is important to them, not the product they produce. That's why I, a musician, am put in charge of the final product. I care. It's up to me, someone with a connection to the product, to make sure everything is right. But once it leaves my hands and is shipped out, I'm done with it. And no, even if your gear is extremely old and nostalgic, I won't fix it/restore it for you. Especially not for free. I have enough stuff to do at work already.
 
Top