Lots of chops..? Nothing wrong with that..

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Ive played bass in bands all my life and all I ever wanted the drummer to do was keep solid time and sound good, and, to play the fill albeit how ever small which fitted the song . And dont ever forget. The crowd on the floor dont give a damn about "chops" and how clever you are around the kit.

unless they are a crowd of people who want to see "chops" and how clever you are around the kit....

I think the bigger mistake/oversight/assumption by many in this argument is that ALL paying crowds only want to "dance to background music"

I have been to over 1000 shows in my life, and 90% of them have been attended by people who PAID to see "chops" and how clever you are around the kit....

when we start making absolutes out of subjective issues, is when we cross into the line of "being wrong"

i agree 100% with @Tob that the pursuit of music should not be reduced down to mindless robot like interpretation to gain payment...but also don't' deny that we have all been raised in a mind set where the attainment of money is more importnat than anything else (sadly) and realize that some people never break out of the mindset to use music as a money making tool

but to say that one mindset is the "right" one, or the most important one, is to really miss the point
 
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Tob

Active member
can't help but think that you feel the need to prove yourself as a drummer.
Swing and a miss. Sorry if I come across that way.
If making money from your craft is a tragic, sad outlook on life you really have a lot to learn.
You know that's not what I said. Making money from playing music is fine. Reducing it to a means of making money is sad. Giving up creativity and expressiveness to make drumming more widely marketable is tragic.

keep solid time and sound good, and, to play the fill albeit how ever small which fitted the song
Ah, now the truth comes out. You had me worried for a bit there. So you admit there's more to drumming than keeping time.
And dont ever forget. The crowd on the floor dont give a damn about "chops" and how clever you are around the kit.
that's an awfully narrow-sighted view

Depends on the crowd, as mrfingers pointed out.

Who says any time music is made, it must be for the enjoyment of some audience? What about music for the sake of music? What about how a musician or group of musicians wants to express their musical taste regardless of who likes it or how profitable it is?

Don't conflate playing tastefully with ostentation. It's possible to play with excellence, taste, and flair without being obtrusive and overbearing.
 

jimb

Member
Well clearly Im of a lower order here cause in all the years, bars, clubs, functions I ever played in I could have sworn I was hired to get them up on the floor dancing....and yes you might get the odd music afficionado who might mention the playing in the band but it was unusual.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
Well clearly Im of a lower order here cause in all the years, bars, clubs, functions I ever played in I could have sworn I was hired to get them up on the floor dancing....and yes you might get the odd music afficionado who might mention the playing in the band but it was unusual.

well...if that is the only kind of gig you are looking for, than that will be your experience with the audiences

it doesn't make you lower order, but it does limit you to only seeing one kind of drumming expectation situation...and that is not wrong either.

in all my years, I have also been hired for those kind of gigs, as well as gigs where the audience was supposed to sit quietly and listen, or destroy each other in a "Wall of Death" mosh pit...and ALL of those experiences have the same amount validity as each other.
 
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mikyok

Platinum Member
Well clearly Im of a lower order here cause in all the years, bars, clubs, functions I ever played in I could have sworn I was hired to get them up on the floor dancing....and yes you might get the odd music afficionado who might mention the playing in the band but it was unusual.
Man we've been doing it wrong all these years and still get hired. We must be bloody lucky!

It must be sitting at the back and not getting noticed ;)
Making money from playing music is fine. Reducing it to a means of making money is sad. Giving up creativity and expressiveness to make drumming more widely marketable is tragic.
It's just business my friend and there's that word again business. What's so hard to understand?

It's like hiring a painter to paint your ceilings white because that goes with the room and you come back and they've painted the Sistine Chapel. Completely over the top ruined your decor but they've expressed themselves creatively. You'd kick them out and make sure nobody ever hired them again!

Being a working musician is no different. Ever had a job where you had to do things that sucked?
 
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