Lots of chops..? Nothing wrong with that..

jimb

Member
But why is it that singers and guitarists are allowed to do that, and drummers (and assuming bassists by extension) aren't?
Man, u need to get an education. Because drums and bass too dont play melody....simple as that. They are there to keep time . Jo public dont care about ur chops or your fancy kit...all they want is a back beat, and u can do that on a two bit beginners kit too. Simples.
 

C.M. Jones

Drum Authority
I have to ‘fess up to being completely befuddled as to why something so subjective is a point of contention.
Ironically, subjectivity is the only entity that ever spawns contention. Threads grounded in indisputable fact spark little interest, but post the following: "I don't like drumming all that much, but I want to get a $5,000.00 kit, even though I might need to sell my car and lie to my girlfriend to do it. Should I go for it?" Heck, the site's bandwidth will be pushed to its limits by eager respondents. Folks like drama. It's what keeps the world spinning, almost off its axis.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Man, u need to get an education. Because drums and bass too dont play melody....simple as that. They are there to keep time . Jo public dont care about ur chops or your fancy kit...all they want is a back beat, and u can do that on a two bit beginners kit too. Simples.
Wow.
 

Yamaha Rider

Silver Member
Unpopular opinion alert:

The reality is that most amateur drummers are terrible and are lucky if they can do even the money beat at a pro level.
Any good college or pro drummer can lay down grooves and fills from the simple to the complex with good feel.
Most aging rock guys have lousy chops and loose time feels. Comes with the territory I guess lol. Maybe that’s why they all harp on the money beat.
Handbags at dawn.
 

Yamaha Rider

Silver Member
But they're not. Take a closer look at who plays in the live bands for the likes of Justin Timberlake, Lady Gaga, Jay Z, etc. It's chop monsters more often than not. It's not like they're doing linear runs all over the songs, but they know when and how to spice it up.

Live material and album material aren't necessarily the same thing.
Before I knew a thing about drumming - I knew I hated live versions of songs I loved where the drummer was showing off.
 

Yamaha Rider

Silver Member
Billie Jean is the exception that does not prove the rule.

Most of MJ's hits had more complex drumming and rhythm, but is hardly talked about. People only focus on that singular one song, but that was definitely not the norm for his music.
It annoys me, nothing to do with the drumming, just because the song (and album) are treated as his greatest works. They aren't.
 

jansara

Junior Member
Chops are a weapon to do whatever needs to be done. What needs to be done is determined by the music. Chops serve the music, not the musician or his accumulated facility for its own sake.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Happens. Every. Time.

The word chops has potent powers that polarizes this community.

I think it may be an incantation lolo

My take on it, and one that works really well for me, is to fill the niche that nobody (it seems) wants to do

I'm talking about playing things as straight as I can, and do my musical talking with volume dynamics, support to the others, and melting into the song....rather than with clever fills. I feel it works better in my situation. I save any flashy stuff for endings. When I see a guy blowing chops inappropriately (according to me), but petering out with the ending...I don't want to be that guy.

To be clear, this is in my world, and my POV, and I'm not saying everybody should do it too. Not at all. That's crazy. But I do want to put it out there.

The hardest thing IMO about melting into the song is mentally resisting the temptation to "break the spell"
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I'm glad folks like George here dont listen to the nonsense and just do their thing.


I would like to remind y'all that any rudiments you may know are considered chops. The more rudiments you know, the more chops you have. Even single strokes are chops.
 

calan

Silver Member
Before I knew a thing about drumming - I knew I hated live versions of songs I loved where the drummer was showing off.
I get that to a degree, but I have a hard time considering it showing off if they were hired for that thing and are likely doing at the behest of the MD.

In my case, pretty much the only way I enjoy these kind pop acts are through their live performances, in large part because of the live orchestration. I enjoy seeing and hearing songs take on new life and to continue to grow after the recording.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Man, u need to get an education. Because drums and bass too dont play melody....simple as that. They are there to keep time . Jo public dont care about ur chops or your fancy kit...all they want is a back beat, and u can do that on a two bit beginners kit too. Simples.
They can play melody/counter melody...sadly it is rare.

I would disagree that drums/bass are for time keeping...time keeping is for the whole unit not just part of it.

Questioning the static makes new maps come into being and wonder to flourish.

On the idea of chops vrs groove...its not just 'this OR that'....there are different conjunctions as well!...an idea we have collectively synthesized over and over.(for those that have not explored the numerous threads on the subject - there is SO much out there to read on this site!)
 
Last edited:

Uncle_MC

Active member
I think of chops as a particular skill set demanded by a particular gig or situation. I.e. "sight-reading chops", "3/4 soloing chops", "afro 6/8 chops", or, "fast, busy, linear," what have you chops.

Bottom line: If YOUR particular musical situation calls for that type of busy playing, then do it and do it well, and feel no shame for playing that way. However, the reality is there are FAR more paying situations where that type of playing will get you fired or not called back, and for those of us who need to make a living doing this, we like to be called back as often as possible.

If that type of drumming is more musically satisfying to you, then I applaud that. We all started this for fun and you should be able to play however you want. But from the people paying us, it's a simple fact that there is less real world demand for it.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
A timely thread from a personal point of view. A quote from one of the guys who evaluated me after an audition yesterday:

"yammyfan had great dynamics and didn’t over play anything..."

Chops are great but they're generally not what gets you hired. Depends what you're trying to achieve, I suppose.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
..Chops are great but they're generally not what gets you hired..


I wonder anyway what the term “getting hired” means for most people..

Is someone who auditions for a bar band that plays once a month “getting hired”..?

Is someone who is part of a coverband that plays 150 gigs a year “getting hired”..?

Is ANY paying gig, or ANY gig for that matter, meaning that someone “got hired”..?

To me, “getting hired”, means that someone is living from playing drums and, as a sort of freelancer, “gets hired” to go from the 1 tour to the other or the 1 studio session to the other or from the 1 workshop clinic to the other, etc..

I played a wedding last week with my band, got paid, but i havent thought 1 second that i was “hired” that evening to play drums..

To me, 99% of all gig situations from by far most drummers, just mean that they played somewhere with their band..

Not that something made them “get hired”..

For other people this may be semantics, but i personally feel a pretty big difference regarding that..
 
Top