Looking forward to a heavy rain...for once.

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
We had the basement water-proofed back in December with perimeter drain, sump (with backup pump and battery), and wall barrier.

I can't refinish the basement until we have a very heavy rain to fully test and ensure the system works. Fortunately the company which did the work has a lifetime warranty to fix any leaks, anywhere water comes in.

I had to set up the drums and get some jamming in. Though now that heavy rain is projected for the weekend, I may be moving them out of the way...which I will gladly do to finally get my base to back.
 

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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
It looks like you got the french drain. If so, sweet. If not, a riser. I built a riser the height of a 2x4 plus 3/4" decking on top because once in a while my floor near the drums would get wet. Not any more, water entry problem got fixed, but I still use the riser. You probably don't need a riser with a french drain, but it certainly couldn't hurt and would offer peace of mind...It would be worth it to check the humidity there just to know if that needs to be addressed as well.

Water problems are big problems to have.
 
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Lee-Bro

Senior Member
Yup, French drain w/ a center lateral leading to the sump as well. There's an 8" drop from the foundation walls to the center drain in the floor.

The house uphill and downhill from me + my house's storm water lines are all tied together and they run under the floor slab of each property, and they are all tied into a center floor drain. The storm line downhill from me collapsed and water backed up to the next lowest point, my basement drain. The neighbor eventually fixed it, but not after lawsuit threats and more flooding in our basement. Thankfully sewage and storm lines are NOT connected here. Here's a snap of one of the floods.

After all of this, I would dare say I'm extremely knowledgeable in residential flooding issues.

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Bozozoid

Well-known member
Yup, French drain w/ a center lateral leading to the sump as well. There's an 8" drop from the foundation walls to the center drain in the floor.

The house uphill and downhill from me + my house's storm water lines are all tied together and they run under the floor slab of each property, and they are all tied into a center floor drain. The storm line downhill from me collapsed and water backed up to the next lowest point, my basement drain. The neighbor eventually fixed it, but not after lawsuit threats and more flooding in our basement. Thankfully sewage and storm lines are NOT connected here. Here's a snap of one of the floods.

After all of this, I would dare say I'm extremely knowledgeable in residential flooding issues.

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Dude..please listen to me....DO NOT get on your electronic kit right now. That sucks...i KNOW what you've been through....drummers are tough though.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
PSA

As an electrician, it *for real* freaks me out to see you or anyone else walking around barefoot in water when (I am assuming here) the electric is on and so close. So allow me to preach mindfulness and electrical common sense to you guys because I care about you. High rubber boots that don't leak would be a safer choice. Even if your panel is off, it's not safe to be in contact with floodwater. Electric could come from outside your home from your neighbor's house through the water. (in a flood) I know you are OK and everything, but that right there are 3 out of the 3 ingredients needed for a fatal shock, uninsulated people, in water, with electric dangerously close. That looks like a hose under water that could be plugged in to a pump somewhere. That's a possible way electric could be introduced into the water, through the wet hose attached to the wet motor...that doesn't even have to be spinning, that could have current leakage.

There could be a source of minor current leakage under the water, not enough to trip a breaker but plenty enough to interrupt your heart. It doesn't take much current at all at all if you're solidly grounded which you are definitely solidly grounded there. As little as 5 one thousandths of an amp...5 miliamps...at only one volt mind you...can totally hijack your heart rhythm and kill you... if you are solidly grounded with no escape. You had nowhere to go there to unground yourself. There was no jumping off a ladder or anything to disconnect yourself from voltage. You probably would have fallen and that would have been it.

That pic is actually disturbing for me to look at. It certainly looks to me like you could have bought the farm there, if the electric was still on. Promise me you'll get good dry rubber boots and turn the house off...with a 3 foot long DRY wooden stick (if you have to stand in water to de-energize) wearing 'dry inside' rubber boots and some kind of glove, untorn rubber would be nice, if there's ever a next time. People have died standing in water turning off the main breaker with their uninsulated hands, hence the need for a dry unconductive stick, high dry boots and dry gloves.

Plumbers have been shocked to death replacing water meters. The panel is electrically and mechanically bonded via conductor to the metal plumbing on purpose to equalize ground potential to the exact same everywhere in the house. This plumber removed the water meter, and bridged the 2 unconnected pipes with his arms. So he made himself a conductor in the circuit, and his body was the connection between voltage and ground. His body absorbed all the amperage the house was using at the time of shock (typically 10-30 amps) because the return path of all the electric (when things are working normally) goes through the water pipe to earth, then from earth back to source. All electric does is to go to ground. We direct it through a lightbulb before going to ground. In this case it went through his body to ground. Water meter sockets have since been re-designed so this can't happen, but there are still old ones out there that can kill the unaware.

Even if the main breaker is off, there's still voltage in the box at the main breaker terminals, that can go through the water, or even just a wet spot. And never shut off unless the meter is pulled even if all the breakers are already off. Pulling the meter is definitely the very first thing I would do there. I can't unsee that. Please don't ever do that again or I can't be your friend anymore :(

It's the kind of pic I see in my Code update classes of what not to do.

I hope the place was de-energized and that glare is the cellphone flash. Please lie to me if necessary so I can sleep tonight.

Actually, do you want to sell the rights to it?

We can photoshop the face.
 
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Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I did since obtain good rubber boots and a trash pump so that the water couldn't pool like that again (in theory).
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Wow - quite the story, & props to you for perseverance!

I've never owned a property with a cellar, so have no experience to relate to. Living on the top of a hill, we have no standing water threat either, but being high up in the lee of mountains, we do have serious runoff volumes to deal with from time to time. I installed over 1,000ft of 8" storm drains a few years ago, so I get the scale of the challenge for sure!
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Wow - quite the story, & props to you for perseverance!

I've never owned a property with a cellar, so have no experience to relate to. Living on the top of a hill, we have no standing water threat either, but being high up in the lee of mountains, we do have serious runoff volumes to deal with from time to time. I installed over 1,000ft of 8" storm drains a few years ago, so I get the scale of the challenge for sure!

Cellars/basements are the work of satan lol. Sooo tempting to have that extra storage space, the underneath access to the floor above, etc.. But unless you live in a desert or the contractor spent an extra 3K getting the drainage exactly right, you WILL have flooding. *shrug*
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
The Historic Black College I worked was right across the street from the Medical College. It was built on land given but it was a swamp. The area developed and swamp drained but the drainage was built in 1800s so really inadequate. So every good rain the area would be swamped. Many of the buildings had a cellar-which was insane given the drainage issue-and yes to this day the basements flood and black mold in many buildings. The building with my office also had a flat roof that continuously leaked and flooded all our offices periodically the whole time I was there. It was a mess.
My house in South Carolina had a basement with no flood issues but it was unfinished so high humidity and I put in a dehumidifier.

I remember years ago getting caught in a bad storm in Gulf of Mexico. Lightening dancing around us-waves crashing-I actually thought it was the end. I was driving the boat and though no direct hit I could feel the electricity-made our hair stand on end. I have a lot of respect for electricity-the funny numb tingly feeling.

I was just a lad but the story goes when we moved into our new home my Dad built in early 60s that I was playing outside. Mom and my Aunt Mary were drinking coffee chit chatting and my Aunt noted me outside turning white from window. I was standing in a puddle near power coming into house and I got electrocuted apparently. I don't remember any of it-and questioned was story elevated as the tale got regaled to me LOL. Then a few years later I got a hold of one of my brothers slot cars and took the motor out. I was always taking stuff apart to figure out how it works. I remember holding the red and green wires of the lil motor and sticking it in the outlet. I saw a big flash-fortunately I was holding the wires so it just sent me for a loop.

Then my Dad put in an electric fence at the dog kennel-some dogs would escape. So my brothers would tie me to the fence and turn it on to watch me get shocked. They did that with frogs first. I watched as they poor helpless critter would squirm then buzzzz. I should have seen what would be coming-me in their next experiment. When I was even younger they caught a tub full of frogs-my Mom freaked and told them to set them free. They did but did so at night and took lighter fluid and set their butts on fire. Boy that caused some neighborhood drama. Kids screaming, frogs on fire spreading fire. Poor Mom trying to deal with my two older brothers activities-my eldest was a town bully. I can't say it brings back fond memories. Most people it's let toast marshmallows not toad frogs or a brother.
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I love basements. I like being underground. Helps with sound naturally. A lot of my income comes from me working in basements. My most favorite spot to be is in my studio in my basement. Dry basements are extremely common where I am. I wish I had a sub basement or two.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Then my Dad put in an electric fence at the dog kennel-some dogs would escape. So my brothers would tie me to the fence and turn it on to watch me get shocked. They did that with frogs first. I watched as they poor helpless critter would squirm then buzzzz. I should have seen what would be coming-me in their next experiment. When I was even younger they caught a tub full of frogs-my Mom freaked and told them to set them free. They did but did so at night and took lighter fluid and set their butts on fire. Boy that caused some neighborhood drama. Kids screaming, frogs on fire spreading fire. Poor Mom trying to deal with my two older brothers activities-my eldest was a town bully. I can't say it brings back fond memories. Most people it's let toast marshmallows not toad frogs or a brother.

Ah brothers. Aren't they so special?

That explains a lot actually :)
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I used to love thunderstorms and watching the rain. But after dealing with floods, especially those in the middle of the night, and having to run pumps including a Champion gas powered pump, to keep the water from reaching the furnace and other appliances, it's hard not to feel panicked or stressed when it rains or I hear thunder.

I'm happy to report that after last night's heavy rains, I didn't end up with a wet basement. I could hear some water trickle into the sump basin and it was a very odd gratifying sound. I'm hoping as we get more rain here and are able to chalk up more instances of a dry basement, my mild panic and anxiety over rain will finally give way to enjoying thunderstorms again.

And the rubber boots are kept near the basement steps, just in case.
 
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