Looking for Country Song w/ Challenging & Good Drums

This song might be a lot of things, but Country isn’t one of them. :ROFLMAO: (y)
Do you have any idea how hard it is to find anything resembling Progressive Country? If you want to join a jam to play something like that, you might as well go out with a bang! :D
I'm gonna find me a horse
Just about this big,
An' ride him all along the border line

With a
Pair of heavy-duty
Zircon-encrusted tweezers in my hand
Every other wrangler would say
I was mighty grand

By myself I wouldn't
Have no boss,
But I'd be raisin' my lonely
Dental Floss
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Platinum Member
This may be a silly analogy, but here's how I compare playing country music with rock and roll:

Playing rock and roll on drums is sort of like a nice sports car or a race car. It can be flashy, fun, fast, and loud. Even slow rock songs and rock ballads can still flashy and loud. Point A to point B can be an adventure in a sports car, especially on a curvy road.

Playing country on drums like diesel pickup truck. Nothing too flashy, but it has a remarkable amount of torque and pulling power. It's a reliable, smooth, steady ride from start to finish. Yes, it can go fast, but when a diesel goes fast, it really means business! Travels from point A to point B are routes which are familiar and any curves are well-memorized and it just cruises through them. There's comfort in the predictability.

and at the end of the rock song, you crash the car into a wall at 200 mph and lose your arm

at the end of the country song, you lose the truck, your dog, your beer and your woman
 

mrthirsty

Junior Member
Country funk might be a cool fusion of styles.

Seriously though, some of the drum parts and sections in Shania Twain songs can be tricky and seem straight ahead upon first listen, like the Beatles.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
This may be a silly analogy, but here's how I compare playing country music with rock and roll:

Playing rock and roll on drums is sort of like a nice sports car or a race car. It can be flashy, fun, fast, and loud. Even slow rock songs and rock ballads can still flashy and loud. Point A to point B can be an adventure in a sports car, especially on a curvy road.

Playing country on drums like diesel pickup truck. Nothing too flashy, but it has a remarkable amount of torque and pulling power. It's a reliable, smooth, steady ride from start to finish. Yes, it can go fast, but when a diesel goes fast, it really means business! Travels from point A to point B are routes which are familiar and any curves are well-memorized and it just cruises through them. There's comfort in the predictability.
Nice analogies.

What music would I play if I rode this?

DEF05C1C-67F4-4723-AB31-189EE1DFCCE1.jpeg
 

Icetech

Gold Member
i think i'm too late..but... good luck if you can get this down :0

P.S. you know.. i first saw that video when he did the lesson live and that song looked near impossible.. 7 years later, it doesn't look that bad, just A LOT of pracitce on my part to get the speed.. do love it though :)
 

calan

Silver Member
I'm still trying to understand the premise. My experience with jams is that the songs are generally pretty easy... because they're jams, and you can't expect everyone on stage to be familiar with every obscure song.

Even if the songs are easy, usually they take on a life of their own, perhaps in part because the players don't know how the song is supposed to go in the first place. Sometimes this takes the song in a less typical direction.

I've never even felt the urge to call out a song at a jam. My desires won't necessarily align with something a vocalist knows, notwithstanding somebody up there needs to know the chords.

Is this more like a showcase where you get to go up with your buddies and play some prepared material?
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
You'd be singing the bad back blues from that hardtail. Probably the need more parts woes as well, although that looks like an S&S built motor so actually quasi-reliable.
It’s a quarter-mile racer, custom built frame & forks, Harley engine.

D27D0FC3-B1EE-470A-9A60-8F829D307798.jpeg
 

Bozozoid

Silver Member
Clutterbilly...by The Ranch. It's Keith Urban like you ain't seen that maniac befor. Train beat but drink an energy drink prior.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
I’ve sat in on country bands many times, I was just looking for something creative to play. For example, Rodeo from Garth Brooks breaks from the norm and has some really inventive drumming but ultimately doesn’t feel over played. I’ve also recently come across Brother Osbourne. The band as a whole keeps you on your toes while still keeping the country roots true.
That's fine... if you find players who know those songs. Most jams revolve around well-known songs (as opposed to deep cuts) or just noodling over common progressions. Unless your friends and you manage to be up at the same time, you may find that the other players don't know those songs.

Basically, don't go in trying to bring something new to the jam just for your pleasure. Everyone else has to be in on it. If you become a regular at the jam and find willing/capable players, you can gradually suggest some songs for them to work on for another get-together. But don't go in trying to up everyone's game... not on your first night anyway. That's not what 'the new guy' does. :)
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
Find yourself some fast instrumentals with a trainbeat.

In any case, plenty of county music, too much to mention, has a lot of challenges with dynamics, feel and transitions.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
Didn't country originally not have drums? I think drums were introduced so singers could stop tapping their guitars.

In all seriousness though, the more technically interesting country drumming is probably done with brushes, which happens to be one hell of a combination of technique, restraint, and musicality.

disclaimer: the above observation and expressed admiration is not to be confused with actually liking country whatsoever.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Didn't country originally not have drums? I think drums were introduced so singers could stop tapping their guitars.
No drums, right. It was like when Dylan went electric, introducing drums into Country music. It was a hard sell to the purists. I think the Grand Old Opry had a no drums policy. Had.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Didn't country originally not have drums? I think drums were introduced so singers could stop tapping their guitars.
A worthy docu-series:

 
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