Looking for advice on my right side issues

ZombieFarmboy

New member
I’m having a lot of trouble... separating (?) my right arm from my right leg. i.e. I am really struggling to separate my hi hat and kick drum. Anyone have any advice or drills you have or still to use to help with this?
 

ZombieFarmboy

New member
That’s what I figured you meant, but wasn’t sure if you were asking if I read music or if I’d read other threads on the forum, lol

I read a little. My son is teaching me, but so far I play mainly by ear. Maybe that’s my problem, huh?
 

ZombieFarmboy

New member
I’m talking about limb independence. I think I found something that might help.


I’ll check this it’s and see how it goes.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Reading definitely helps - you can play the pattern slowly and see which limbs go together and which are on their own. Rather than guessing when to play the foot, which hand, etc. Then gradually speed up until you can do it on autopilot. (a few hundred or a few thousand repetitions).
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
Isolate the limbs and play only that limb at a time. Count while you play only that limb. Then combine limbs ad see where you are.

Alternatively, Only play the bass drum beats with the right hand you are having trouble with.
 

oldskoolsoul

Silver Member
In my opinion, all depends on your targets in life..

If you want to just be able to play a simple beat and stay like that your whole life, there is no need at all to learn to read..

But, like has been said before, if you really want to understand rhythmical concepts and therefore really grow as a player, reading is a must..

Also to this rule are exeptions btw, since for example Dennis Chambers also can not read music (this as a sidenote)..

Another advantage is, that once you can read all of a sudden you have access to a never ending source of information (books, etc)..
 

TMe

Senior Member
Some of the ancient Greeks were opposed to written language, fearing it would make people stop using their memory and make them stupider. That's sort of like how some people think cell phones are making people stupider nowadays.

Hmmm.... Maybe they had a point. (Kidding.) ;)
 

nolibos

Well-known member
Use the first page of Stone's "Stick Control" RLRL RLRL RLRL RLRL etc. right hand =R, right foot =L, then left foot=R, right foot=L (or visa versa). Work down the page.
If you don't have this book yet (everyone should own it) start with the different inversions of the Paradiddle. Ex. RLRR LRLL, RLLR LRRL, RRLR LLRL,
RLRL LRLR.
As with everything in life start slowly.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I can read but I hate it. I read music from band and saxophone in youth but drum notation it's a slow go. I can't sight read drum notation-which I think is the real difference-so give you music you go. The lack of that skill limited my gigs-it's my fault. I can slowly read it and learn it to memory then I just have memory charts to keep all the songs straight. My bad.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
Another thing to be aware of is when to lift your right foot. If you’re used to lifting it in unison with your right hand you’ll need to practice lifting earlier so you’re ready to play in the gaps. I think the backswing is more important than people realise.

Also try exercises like: RH RF RH RF R&LH RF RH RF starting slow until your foot is used to playing off beats on its own.
 

hawksmoor

Senior Member
In my opinion, all depends on your targets in life..

If you want to just be able to play a simple beat and stay like that your whole life, there is no need at all to learn to read..

But, like has been said before, if you really want to understand rhythmical concepts and therefore really grow as a player, reading is a must..

Also to this rule are exeptions btw, since for example Dennis Chambers also can not read music (this as a sidenote)..

Another advantage is, that once you can read all of a sudden you have access to a never ending source of information (books, etc)..
Wow. Didn't know that Dennis Chambers couldn't read music. I know it's a sidenote, but I'm a bit blown away by that.
 
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