Looking at the future...

DrummerCA35

Senior Member
Yeah, no one has a crystal ball. It will be interesting to see what will happen in the future. Our band played a mix of cover material...ranging from Journey, to Eddie money, to KC and the sunshine band, to Bruno Mars, to wild cherry, to Lady Gaga…But probably the majority of the tunes being 70s and 80s.

We had a really good several years. Really, for me the best gigs of my life ranging from a number of weddings to clubs to festivals to parties, etc.

If things ever go back to any semblance of normal it’ll be interesting to see if anyone wants to hire a cover band anymore. Will the whole paradigm change, or will people want to go back to dancing to a live band with a passion? Or will everyone just be too old for this genre? I’ve read some articles that think that the bands that we are covering, the older ones, may not come back at all.

Hope everyone is doing well.
 
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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I could devise a detailed cultural analysis on this topic, examining intricate variables and elusive potentialities, culminating in a panoramic sociological study that seeks to foretell the most hidden underpinnings of what awaits humanity as we know it. Regardless, it would be a lot more logical to accept the following reality: We're in uncharted waters. No one knows the endgame here, let alone the future of the entertainment industry. Waiting is all we can do.
 

Frank

Gold Member
Interesting that you posted this. I posted this to another forum a few minutes ago, after a first return to live play yesterday:

___________________________________________________________

Yesterday, I had my very first gig since covid. It was an outdoor gig behind a brewery/restaurant on a farm. There were plenty of tables and chairs outside, and an outdoor shaded stage. Crowd was a pretty good size, and it was an overall great day. Playing live to an enthusiastic crowd on a nice sunny day - was like breathing pure oxygen.

I have been starting to think, though, about what is next. Some of us are catching at least a Little activity with stuff outdoors. And, I guess, some of that can creep into the fall. But eventually, outdoors ceases to be an option. And then what. How many venues will have enough Distanced Space indoors to justify paying a band?

And let's face it. Why is a band there usually? To Keep people there. To keep people - shhhh, don't tell anyone - Drinking. Meanwhile, the regulations in New York State are Specifically designed to Not Facilitate Drinking at venues.

So, this is my take on what is going to happen over the next 9 to 12 months, for large bands like mine, at least, in my region of New York State:

- We still will have some significant time before a vaccine is available.

- I believe there is going to be very slow adoption of the vaccine, and the percentage is not going to be high - at least not at the start.

- I believe there will be a Small number of gigs available between now and the fall for - large - bands like mine.

- Then I believe we will Again be blacked out between, say, November to March or further.

- Then the outdoors will resume.

- And then, finally, whenever finally is, we will achieve enough vaccination protection to bring us to Some form of what we used to have.

What are your thoughts?
 

DrummerCA35

Senior Member
People listened to Beethoven or Chopin before the 1918 Spanish Flu, and continue to listen to this music a century after, including at live concerts.
Interesting that you posted this. I posted this to another forum a few minutes ago, after a first return to live play yesterday:

___________________________________________________________

Yesterday, I had my very first gig since covid. It was an outdoor gig behind a brewery/restaurant on a farm. There were plenty of tables and chairs outside, and an outdoor shaded stage. Crowd was a pretty good size, and it was an overall great day. Playing live to an enthusiastic crowd on a nice sunny day - was like breathing pure oxygen.

I have been starting to think, though, about what is next. Some of us are catching at least a Little activity with stuff outdoors. And, I guess, some of that can creep into the fall. But eventually, outdoors ceases to be an option. And then what. How many venues will have enough Distanced Space indoors to justify paying a band?

And let's face it. Why is a band there usually? To Keep people there. To keep people - shhhh, don't tell anyone - Drinking. Meanwhile, the regulations in New York State are Specifically designed to Not Facilitate Drinking at venues.

So, this is my take on what is going to happen over the next 9 to 12 months, for large bands like mine, at least, in my region of New York State:

- We still will have some significant time before a vaccine is available.

- I believe there is going to be very slow adoption of the vaccine, and the percentage is not going to be high - at least not at the start.

- I believe there will be a Small number of gigs available between now and the fall for - large - bands like mine.

- Then I believe we will Again be blacked out between, say, November to March or further.

- Then the outdoors will resume.

- And then, finally, whenever finally is, we will achieve enough vaccination protection to bring us to Some form of what we used to have.

What are your thoughts?
Thanks for this post. Congratulations on your gig; that sounds great. That feeling that you had is the reason we do it, right? Are certainly the reason I do it. There’s some musicians and bands I know in my area who a couple of months ago I think played outside on a patio with masks on. But I think this was short-lived. Another musician I know is going solo outside on a patio. Our band actually received a good offer for a very good paying gig at a festival, but some of the bandmates were adamant that they would not play for the remainder of 2020 at least. It’s just gonna be different from state to state obviously. Or even county to county. I think your last sentence is what I see as well, at some point go back to some form of what we used to have. As I posted, will be interesting to me, is if people come back.
 

Frank

Gold Member
Thanks for this post. Congratulations on your gig; that sounds great. That feeling that you had is the reason we do it, right? Are certainly the reason I do it. There’s some musicians and bands I know in my area who a couple of months ago I think played outside on a patio with masks on. But I think this was short-lived. Another musician I know is going solo outside on a patio. Our band actually received a good offer for a very good paying gig at a festival, but some of the bandmates were adamant that they would not play for the remainder of 2020 at least. It’s just gonna be different from state to state obviously. Or even county to county. I think your last sentence is what I see as well, at some point go back to some form of what we used to have. As I posted, will be interesting to me, is if people come back.
It has been interesting to see how different everyone's reaction to all this is.

Frankly, I thought this was going to fold my band. Not too many weeks ago, the band email dialog sounded like no one was going to get anywhere near a gig. Then the summer came, and a couple of outdoor gigs presented themselves, and everyone was on board.

I Do think this thing is going to spawn a Whole lot more smaller bands. Smaller, quieter bands will have more options when we get to winter. My band is a loud, 5 piece, and I think we are going to go dark for many months when the weather changes.

It's sad. Terrible time.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
I wrote a long and boring essay yesterday on Facebook comparing this mess, as far as changing the world, to 9/11 and assorted events that changed how we travel by air. Humans are adaptable and will get through this. I have no crystal ball or date in mind, but my mind tells me we will return ro a new normal. Be patient and do your part.
 

Anduin

Pioneer Member
Well, the Roaring 20s happened after the 1918 ‘flu, so I will continue to believe (or at least hope) that live music will return in a big way. (Fingers crossed. No bets taken on this one. Have I hedged enough?).
 

DrummerCA35

Senior Member
It has been interesting to see how different everyone's reaction to all this is.

Frankly, I thought this was going to fold my band. Not too many weeks ago, the band email dialog sounded like no one was going to get anywhere near a gig. Then the summer came, and a couple of outdoor gigs presented themselves, and everyone was on board.

I Do think this thing is going to spawn a Whole lot more smaller bands. Smaller, quieter bands will have more options when we get to winter. My band is a loud, 5 piece, and I think we are going to go dark for many months when the weather changes.

It's sad. Terrible time.
Agreed. And our band too. A hella loud 6-piece.
 
I predict it will all go back to normal . Not sure when , but it will ! I have to believe this , otherwise I’d fall to despair . People WILL come back as long as it’s safe . Music always endures s , and live music will always be a thing ,.... and survive . The whole world is working on this so I have faith 🙏🏻.

But humor is how I deal with stuff so then there’s always this ..........

4A9D2B65-EF66-4F9A-8F4F-F9E4D9D46CA5.jpeg
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
My group plays funk, dance, & Motown 70s-present. We had about 2 dozen shows lined up for this year: festivals, corp. events, city concerts, etc.

We've played 3 shows all year and today had our last remaining scheduled show (in September) cancelled.

That being said, we're receiving A LOT of 2021 inquires and I have about 20 bids out for private events and have booked 8 more. All of them are mid-March and beyond. We play very similar if not the same songs as the OP and the response I'm seeing is that people want to dance and have fun. We're based out of Cincy and we're receiving inquires from everywhere: that includes California, Oregon, and Florida. If any of you are in those areas and play similar music as we do, PM me and maybe I can send you some gig leads for 2021.
 

Griffin

Well-known member
Well, the Roaring 20s happened after the 1918 ‘flu, so I will continue to believe (or at least hope) that live music will return in a big way. (Fingers crossed. No bets taken on this one. Have I hedged enough?).
Need a fingers crossed reaction tho this haha. But I have a feeling you’re right. looking at Instagram the clubs across Europe are scarily packed with young people completely ignoring health measures, so I think some kind of Roaring Twenties style reaction to all this is entirely plausible. If it’s all young people though the genres that get played may shift a bit.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
With pubs re-opening here but with restricted numbers and no dancing allowed, we’re finding the sit down/listen acts are doing better than the party/dance bands.

I mixed a band last week that played Carole King/Linda Ronstadt songs and the pub was full of people sitting at tables, having meals and listening quietly, having bought tickets online, like a seated concert. But party bands are too loud for that situation.
 

donzo74

Junior Member
we’re finding the sit down/listen acts are doing better than the party/dance bands
Yes, one of my bands has lost almost all shows due to venues closing, sadly permanently, and the remaining places canceling us and going with smaller solo, duo or trio acts. No bookings for that group until November. Another group I played in has folded because we had a few bookings, one this passed weekend in fact, but some members just weren't ready to go back out yet. So, we cancelled the remaining bookings and dissolved the group. Thankfully, I got a call that same week to join a well known and very good country band in my area after their drummer quit and we had our first rehearsal on Sunday. It went very well and the fall is starting to book up with campground shows, weddings and festivals with them. Once the cold weather hits and things move indoors, we'll see if it keeps up but I'm prepping for a slow holiday season and winter.
 
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