LM402 ring

Fritz Frigursson

Senior Member
So I got a new snare, a 2020 Ludwig Supraphonic 14x6.5. I really like it so far and I put a Remo CS coated batter with a Diplomat reso thinking the reverse dot would provide a bit of muffling and remove some overtones. I was kinda wrong because the drum tends to still have a metallic ring to it. Should I put new heads on it? Or a moongel? Or are Supraphonics all meant to have this particular ringing sound?
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
First, a dot does not attenuate the ring (harmonics.) The dot attenuates the fundamental a bit, which makes the ring clearer, and translates into greater attack, which is perceived as volume. That's why dot heads are reputed to be louder. *

To reduce ring, you can use gel or gaff tape or a store-bought ring. Note that reducing the ring takes some of the life away from the drum in an acoustic situation. Unless you're mic'd, I'd play the drum wide open.

But you can tame the ring a bit with a 2-ply head, which balances the fundamental and harmonics better. I use an Evans ST (Super Tough) on almost all of my snares, and except when mic'd, I leave it wide open. Even when mic'd, I use minimal damping. Harmonics are part of the snare's sound.

Bermuda

* I know, there are some doubters. Try this - place your finger lightly in the center of your snare or tom head. That acts kind of like a dot does. Strike the head with a stick. Now remove your finger and strike again. Hear the difference? :)
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Don't kill the overtones, that's what makes the snares great. Trust me in a live mix or a recording, you wont notice them (ignore St Anger)

If you dampen the shit out of it, you might as well have bought a cheap snare.

I set mine up with an ambassador resonant head/emporer batter with 42 strand wires. Works for me.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
A single-ply head with a dot is my favorite head for a Supraphonic. If that's still too ringy I'd add something subtle like half of a Moongel to tame it a bit in the drum room. But I think that little bit of "ping" a Supra has is the key to that drum's sound, and when you remove that, you rob the drum of what makes it special.
 

Freewill3

Member
I was one of those people who never really gave any thought to removing the lug gaskets...until I tried it. Now, the difference isn't night and day but there is a difference. Supraphonics are lively drums and there is some inherent ring or overtones or what have you. I did this to my LM402 and my 5x14 Copperphonic with very pleasing results and the lug splay was not an issue at all. Aside from head and wire choice, try removing the gaskets and and let your ears decide.
 
Does removing the rubber gaskets eliminate unwanted ring? I always thought the gaskets lead to additional dampening.
The LM402 does ring a bit, but it has one of the least annoying overtone sprectrum of all snare drums I ever played. I would call it a rather dry and very musical drum. Never had to muffle it in any live situation. I mostly use a Ludwig weather master (heavy) batter head, and it feels just right.
 

cdrums21

Gold Member
In my experience, the rubber gaskets slightly inhibit the shell’s ability to resonate. Removing them gives the drum more presence and a fuller tonality, a definite improvement in my opinion. It doesn’t really make the drum ring more in an unpleasant way, but instead, allows the shell to speak at its fullest potential. I don’t know why someone at Ludwig never stopped to consider how those gaskets would affect the shell. It’s a lot of rubber when added all up. The older shells don’t have gaskets and sound awesome. Like others have said, the “ring” of a supraphonic and other snares helps the drum project and cut through the sound of other instruments. I have a 1976 402 and I never muffle it live, mic’ed or not mic’ed. I normally play a coated emperor over a hazy ambassador. Bottom head is very tight, about a “G”. Top head medium tight, about a “D”. The snare has a slight overtone, but in the mix, it sounds perfect. I prescribe to the Simon Phillips method of tuning a drum, tune them up, wide open and let them sing, especially toms. It’s an acquired taste, but once you get used to it, you’ll never want to play muffled drums again.
 
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larryace

"Uncle Larry"
In my experience, the rubber gaskets slightly inhibit the shell’s ability to resonate. Removing them gives the drum more presence and a fuller tonality, a definite improvement in my opinion. It doesn’t really make the drum ring more in an unpleasant way, but instead, allows the shell to speak at its fullest potential. I don’t know why someone at Ludwig never stopped to consider how those gaskets would affect the shell. It’s a lot of rubber when added all up. The older shells don’t have gaskets and sound awesome. Like others have said, the “ring” of a supraphonic and other snares helps the drum project and cut through the sound of other instruments. I have a 1976 402 and I never muffle it live, mic’ed or not mic’ed. I normally play a coated emperor over a hazy ambassador. Bottom head is very tight, about a “G”. Top head medium tight, about a “D”. The snare has a slight overtone, but in the mix, it sounds perfect. I prescribe to the Simon Phillips method of tuning a drum, tune them up, wide open and let them sing, especially toms. It’s an acquired taste, but once you get used to it, you’ll never want to play muffled drums again.
I'm with you brother. Nothing soft on my shells.

On paper, if a more controlled sound is desired, the gaskets should probably stay on. In real life, experimenting removing them is the only way to know.

If even more overtone control is wanted, moleskin patches on the inside of the shell will absorb stray frequencies.
 

theseer2

Junior Member
I drilled in a ludwig tone control knob yesterday, best way to control the sound. I use a slightly worn vintage emp on top. Mine did not come with gaskets.
 
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