List of 100+ jazz standards

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
Reading through this thread about "Jazz Drumming Advise" - https://www.drummerworld.com/forums/index.php?threads/jazz-drumming-advise.172697/ and the thread "What 10 jazz songs..." - https://www.drummerworld.com/forums...z-songs-should-every-jazz-drummer-know.97538/, I'd like to expand it to a list of 100 everyone should know. And then maybe the "next 100" you should know, etc.

I realize there are many, many more. I'm not a jazz drummer, don't have a jazz background but would like to start learning some jazz standards and I'd like your help in putting together a list of at least 100 jazz standards drummers should know.

Again, this is to build a list of songs, not a discussion about "what jazz should be," or "do this before trying to play jazz," etc.

I swiped this list from another source online to get it started. Please drop your recommendations for 5-10 songs (more if you're so inclined) that you'd expect someone to know or you'd consider a jazz standard. I'll update the list w/ everyone's recommendations and hopefully it'll be useful to others as well.

------------
  1. A Night in Tunisia
  2. Alice In Wonderland
  3. All Blue
  4. All of Me
  5. All The Things You Are
  6. Alone Together
  7. Au Privave
  8. Autumn Leaves
  9. Beautiful Love
  10. Bernie's Tune
  11. Billie’s Bounce
  12. Black Orpheus
  13. Blue Bossa
  14. Blues For Alice
  15. Body and Soul
  16. But Not For Me
  17. Bye Bye Blackbird
  18. Cantaloupe Island
  19. Caravan
  20. Cherokee
  21. Cold Duck Time
  22. Come Rain or Come Shine
  23. Confirmation
  24. Corcovado
  25. Cousin Mary
  26. Days of Wine and Roses
  27. Doxy
  28. Fly Me To The Moon
  29. Foggy Day
  30. Footprints
  31. Four
  32. Freddie Freeloader
  33. Good Bait
  34. Have You Met Miss Jones
  35. How High The Moon
  36. How Insensitive
  37. I Can't Get Started
  38. I Could Write A Book
  39. I Fall In Love Too Easily
  40. I Hear a Rhapsody
  41. I Love You
  42. I Remember You
  43. I Should Care
  44. I’ll Remember April
  45. I’m Old Fashioned
  46. If I Should Lose You
  47. If I Were A Bell
  48. In A Mellow Tone
  49. In A Sentimental Mood
  50. It Could Happen To You
  51. Jordu
  52. Joy Spring
  53. Just Friends
  54. Lover Man
  55. Mack The Knife
  56. Meditation
  57. Misty
  58. Moanin
  59. Moose the Mooche
  60. My Funny Valentine
  61. My Favorite Things
  62. Night Has A Thousand Eyes
  63. No Greater Love
  64. Night and Day
  65. Oleo
  66. On Green Dolphin Street
  67. One For Amos
  68. One Note Samba
  69. Paper Moon
  70. Polka Dots
  71. Recorda Me
  72. Round Midnight
  73. Satin Doll
  74. Scrapple From The Apple
  75. Sister Sadie
  76. So What
  77. Stella By Starlight
  78. Softly As In a Morning Sunrise
  79. Solar
  80. Someday My Prince Will Come
  81. Song For My Father
  82. Song Is You
  83. St. Thomas
  84. Stella By Starlight
  85. Such Sweet Thunder
  86. Sugar
  87. Sweet Georgia Brown
  88. Take 5
  89. Take The A Train
  90. Tenor Madness
  91. The Girl From Ipanema
  92. There Is No Greater Love
  93. There Will Never Be Another You
  94. Turnaround
  95. Up Jumped Spring
  96. Wave
  97. What Is This Thing Called Love
  98. Yardbird Suite
  99. Yesterdays
  100. You And The Night

The next 100
  1. A Love Supreme
  2. All of You
  3. Anthropology
  4. April in Paris
  5. Birdland
  6. Bitches Brew
  7. Blue In Green
  8. Blue Monk
  9. Blue Rondo a la Turk
  10. Blue Train
  11. Blues Walk
  12. Bluesette
  13. Broadway
  14. Bye-Ya
  15. Cast Your Fate To The Wind
  16. Compared To What
  17. Cool Blues
  18. Desafinado
  19. Django
  20. Do Nothing Til You Hear From Me
  21. Donna Lee
  22. Don’t Get Around Much Anymore
  23. Doodlin'
  24. East of the Sun
  25. Epistrophy
  26. Flamenco Sketches
  27. Giant Steps
  28. God Bless The Child
  29. Gone With The Wind
  30. Good Morning Heartache
  31. Goodbye Pork Pie Hat
  32. Groovin’ High
  33. Hackensack
  34. I Got Rhythm
  35. I Mean You
  36. Impressions
  37. In the Mood
  38. In Walked Bud
  39. Invitation
  40. Just One Of Those Things
  41. Gentle Rain
  42. Killer Joe
  43. Lady Bird
  44. Laura
  45. Like Someone In Love
  46. Lester Leaps In
  47. Let's Cool One
  48. Long Ago And Far Away
  49. Lush Life
  50. Maiden Voyage
  51. Mambo Inn
  52. Mercy, Mercy, Mercy
  53. Midnight Waltz
  54. Mood Indigo
  55. Mr. PC
  56. My Little Suede Shoes
  57. My Romance
  58. Naima
  59. Oh, Lady Be Good
  60. Once In A While
  61. Once I Loved
  62. Orange Colored Sky
  63. Out of Nowhere
  64. Pennies from Heaven
  65. Perdido
  66. Poinciana
  67. Red Clay
  68. Rhapsody in Blue
  69. Ruby, My Dear
  70. Sack of Woe
  71. Salt Peanuts
  72. Samba de Orfeu
  73. Sandu
  74. September Song
  75. Shiny Stockings
  76. Sidewinder
  77. Sing Sing Sing
  78. So Danco Samba
  79. Sonnymoon for Two
  80. Spain
  81. Star Eyes
  82. Stars Fell On Alabama
  83. Stolen Moments
  84. Straight No Chaser
  85. Strange Fruit
  86. Summertime
  87. Sweet and Lovely
  88. Tangerine
  89. The Best Thing For You
  90. The Theme
  91. They Can't Take That Away From Me
  92. Triste
  93. Tune-Up
  94. Walt For Debby
  95. Watermelon Man
  96. Well You Needn't
  97. West End Blues
  98. When the Saints Go Marching In
  99. Willow Weep for Me
  100. Work Song

The 3rd set of 100
  1. Ain't Misbehavin'
  2. Along Came Betty
  3. Autumn in New York
  4. At Last
  5. Beatrice
  6. Begin the Beguine
  7. Bolivia
  8. Bumpin' (On Sunset)
  9. Breakfast Feud
  10. Bye Bye Blackbird
  11. Ceora
  12. Cheryl
  13. Conception
  14. Cottontail
  15. Darn That Dream
  16. Dear Old Stockholm
  17. Diminuendo & Crescendo in Blue
  18. Dolphin Dance
  19. Easy To Love
  20. Emily
  21. Fever
  22. Feeling Good
  23. Freedom Jazz Dance
  24. Four On Six
  25. Hot House
  26. I Got It Bad
  27. In Your Own Sweet Way
  28. In 'n Out
  29. It Don't Mean a Thing
  30. Koko
  31. Linus and Lucy
  32. Love For Sale
  33. Manteca
  34. Milestones
  35. Misterioso
  36. Move
  37. Moody's Mood For Love
  38. Nardis
  39. Now's the Time
  40. Nuages
  41. One O'Clock Jump
  42. Ornithology
  43. Potato Head Blues
  44. Resolution
  45. Rocket Number 9 (Take Off For the Planet Venus)
  46. Sophisticated Lady
  47. Speak Low
  48. St. Louis Blues
  49. Stablemates
  50. Stardust
  51. Struttin' with Some BBQ
  52. The In Crowd
  53. These Foolish Things
  54. This Can't Be Love
  55. Three Little Words
  56. Tipitina
  57. Whisper Not
 
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MG1127

Well-known member
get The Real Book ... looks like this was copies from there

Many of these never get called

Here's a list of stuff that gets called regularly

Lover Man
No Greater Love
Stella
How High The Moon
Alone Together
Beautiful Love
Softly As In
Tenor Madness
I Fall In Love Too Easily
Polka Dots
I Hear A Rhapsody
Autumn Leaves
I can't Get Started
Corcovado
How Insensitive
I should care
One For Amos
It Could Happen
Yesterdays
St. Thomas
Blue Bossa
You And The Night
Freddie Freeloader
Cantaloupe Island
Sweet and Lovely
Triste
Once In A While
Moanin'
Mr.PC
Gone With The Wind
There Will Never Be Another You
Have You Met Miss Jones
Midnight Waltz
My Funny Valentine
The Best Thing For You
Solar
All The Things
Doodlin'
Blues Walk
My Romance
Stars Fell On Alabama
They Can't Take That Away From Me
Killer Joe
Hackensack
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Would "That's Amore" be considered jazz? It's very loung-y like Mack the Knife.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Both good lists, except where are the Monk tunes!

It depends on your community, or communities within communities, for who calls what-- see what your local people are playing.

I think the only things there I've never played on a jazz gig or session are: Mambo Inn (dk what that is), Orange Col Sky (played it on show gigs), Sing Sing Sing, In The Mood (both swing/event band tunes), Saints (dixieland item). I've never had Sack o' Woe called, ever. For whatever reason.

Bye-Ya
Let's Cool One
Well You Needn't
In Walked Bud
Blue Monk
Straight No Chaser
I Mean You
Epistrophy

Add:
All of You
Broadway
Long Ago And Far Away
Just One Of Those Things
Invitation
I Love You
Night Has A Thousand Eyes
Cousin Mary
Sandu
Sonnymoon for Two
Song For My Father
Turnaround
Jordu
Blues For Alice
Good Bait
Alice In Wonderland
Someday My Prince Will Come
I Could Write A Book
Sugar
Come Rain or Come Shine
Paper Moon
Foggy Day
Joy Spring
Wave
Once Note Samba
Meditation
Song Is You
Au Privave
Yardbird Suite
 
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newoldie

Silver Member
Reading through this thread about "Jazz Drumming Advise" - https://www.drummerworld.com/forums/index.php?threads/jazz-drumming-advise.172697/ and the thread "What 10 jazz songs..." - https://www.drummerworld.com/forums...z-songs-should-every-jazz-drummer-know.97538/, I'd like to expand it to a list of 100 everyone should know. And then maybe the "next 100" you should know, etc.

I realize there are many, many more. I'm not a jazz drummer, don't have a jazz background but would like to start learning some jazz standards and I'd like your help in putting together a list of at least 100 jazz standards drummers should know.

Again, this is to build a list of songs, not a discussion about "what jazz should be," or "do this before trying to play jazz," etc.

I swiped this list from another source online to get it started. Please drop your recommendations for 5-10 songs (more if you're so inclined) that you'd expect someone to know or you'd consider a jazz standard. I'll update the list w/ everyone's recommendations and hopefully it'll be useful to others as well.

------------
  1. A Night in Tunisia
  2. All Blue
  3. All of Me
  4. All The Things You Are
  5. Alone Together
  6. Autumn Leaves
  7. Bernie's Tune
  8. Billie’s Bounce
  9. Black Orpheus
  10. Blue Bossa
  11. Body and Soul
  12. But Not For Me
  13. Bye Bye Blackbird
  14. Caravan
  15. Cherokee
  16. Cold Duck Time
  17. Confirmation
  18. Days of Wine and Roses
  19. Doxy
  20. Fly Me To The Moon
  21. Footprints
  22. Four
  23. Have You Met Miss Jones
  24. How High The Moon
  25. I Hear a Rhapsody
  26. I Love You
  27. I Remember You
  28. I Should Care
  29. I’ll Remember April
  30. I’m Old Fashioned
  31. If I Should Lose You
  32. If I Were A Bell
  33. In A Mellow Tone
  34. In A Sentimental Mood
  35. In the Mood
  36. It Could Happen To You
  37. Just Friends
  38. Mack The Knife
  39. Mambo Inn
  40. Misty
  41. Moanin
  42. Moose the Mooche
  43. My Funny Valentine
  44. My Favorite Things
  45. Night and Day
  46. Oleo
  47. On Green Dolphin Street
  48. Orange Colored Sky
  49. Recorda Me
  50. Round Midnight
  51. Sack of Woe
  52. Satin Doll
  53. Sing Sing Sing
  54. Sister Sadie
  55. Stella By Starlight
  56. Scrapple From The Apple
  57. So What
  58. Solar
  59. St. Thomas
  60. Such Sweet Thunder
  61. Sweet Georgia Brown
  62. Take 5
  63. Take The A Train
  64. The Girl From Ipanema
  65. There Is No Greater Love
  66. There Will Never Be Another You
  67. Up Jumped Spring
  68. What Is This Thing Called Love
  69. When the Saints go Marching In
  70. Yesterdays
Thanks for posting this! Great idea and a handy resource for the neo-jazz drummer in me.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
My advice, especially since you're a self-declared "not a jazz drummer," would be to find songs that you enjoy listening to, and learn those, first. Learn the charts, listen to different versions by different artists, play along to them...get into them. Which tunes are catchy to you? Learn those first.

When I started playing jazz, I came from a rock/pop/classical background. I tried to learn some tunes because I read a "must know" list like you're compiling, and some of them I didn't enjoy (and, have never really *had* to ever play them at a gig...). It stifled my motivation a bit. I still learned the tunes, but it wasn't until later, when the perspective of other tunes helped them make more sense to me.

If you are wanting to play out, like at a jam session or with a group, find out what the local musicians play. There might be songs on the "top 100 list" that they all know but never play. There might be songs that don't appear in any of the Real Books that are local favorites.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
Update: I've incorporated the suggestions and started the "2nd 100" list. Thanks for the help so far.
 

Caz

Senior Member
It's nice to see these tunes written into a list. All but a couple on the first 100 list do come up a lot in the UK anyway. If you're starting playing jazz I think the best approach is listening to and enjoying the music. So with that in mind I think it's always good to listen to albums, anything by John Coltrane, Wayne Shorter, Miles Davis, Thelonious Monk, Art Blakey etc. You'll come across tunes that get played a fair bit that aren't currently on the lists yet like Moment's Notice, 26-2, E.S.P., Stablemates, This I Dig of You, naturally just by listening to albums.

I did use a list like this at first, it was a copy from the Manhattan School of Music's degree course. But it was to learn the tunes on piano, as learning the chord changes and melody helps to play them on drums, and I didn't get through the list as ended up spending more time on certain ones. From a drummer's perspective it's maybe helpful to work on categories of tunes like rhythm changes and blues to make sure you know what's going on musically and can hear the chord changes that the band are playing. It also might be helpful to group some of these into categories like ballads, medium tempo, up tempo, and latin styles. I think it was helpful for me to really analyse a small number of tunes - learn the melody and harmony, listen to and play along with various recordings, transcribe bits etc. as that process gets you a bit of a foundation to get out playing with people, then the bigger repertoire came over time through playing with people and listening to albums. Also every time you go to a jam and they play something you don't know, it's good to make a note of the tune and then check it out later.

Nice work - good luck with it
Caroline
 
Excellent advice all around - I can mostly repeat some stuff and add on to it here and there:
1. Listen to lots of different tunes, try to play some that you like for yourself
2. Go to local sessions, recognize tunes and ask about unknown tunes
3. Learn tunes that get called frequently and that you would feel comfortable playing
4. Join the session for a few tunes, maybe propose playing a tune you like and know

If you're completely new to playing Jazz, it might be easier to play songs with a singer because the vocalist often just wants a nice groove for a ballad, Bossa Nova or medium Swing. Then there might be a piano or guitar solo and that's it. Playing behind them helps to build some confidence in your groove and the other players get to know you. Tell them before that you don't want to solo (unless you want to, of course :D )

In an instrumental trio that plays something like a Wayne Shorter tune, the drummer typically gets more solos and more flexibility / interplay is expected. So I wouldn't want to go to my first session ever and have the other musicians call something along those lines. Try to pick something manageable and build from there.
Most Jazz players I've met are happy to accept novice players but there could be that one jerk that calls a very fast or complicated tune just to put the new musician in his/her place. I've seen it happen a few times and it's not pretty.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Wow long lists- new stuff to try. I’m not a jazz drummer either but it’s nice to see I have tried many on list. More I haven’t but I was surprised that I have a dent-,I thought I was more at scratch. I don’t care if I get to play for a gig -I’d like to expand my horizons. For any jazz standard there must be countless versions/renditions with different tempo or take on it by same or different artist- like Cantaloupe island . The irony a jazz standard that doesn’t really have a standard way to play it LOL
 

s1212z

Well-known member
Very nice to organize a list. It gets a bit intimidating on the variety of interpretations of each one of these tunes; the list get exponentially longer. I've worked on standards that got twisted into weird progressive avenues and it was a lot of fun. I'm not sure what a jazz drummer is exactly or when you get that title though :unsure: I'd rather keep it inclusive so that anyone jump in with varying degrees of mastery and interpretation. 80/20 drummer channel had comments on how he got negative feedback from bandmates for not knowing certain standards while subbing....I can't remember the video but I recall it interesting and pertinent to the topic here (I'll post it if I can find it).
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Very nice to organize a list. It gets a bit intimidating on the variety of interpretations of each one of these tunes;

If you listen to all of the normal records and play the tunes a couple of times you pick up on the arrangement elements you're supposed to catch.

80/20 drummer channel had comments on how he got negative feedback from bandmates for not knowing certain standards while subbing....
Fear and status-seeking are kind of his brand, so don't worry about that too much. 99% of the time you can just play whatever they call without a chart and without ever having heard it.
 

jansara

Junior Member
Many of those tunes. i.e. Autumn Leaves, Days of Wine and Roses, All of Me, Ipanema, In The Mood, etc. etc. are popular tunes, not jazz.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Let's add some more, what the hell-- we're not even getting that deep into it, many or most of these get played a lot. Depending on who you hang around....

Confirmation
Donna Lee
Cheryl
Now's the Time
Cottontail
I Got It Bad
Move
Milestones (old)
Along Came Betty
In Your Own Sweet Way
These Foolish Things
Hot House
Stablemates
Out of Nowhere
Dolphin Dance
Maiden Voyage
Love For Sale
Easy To Love
Pent Up House
Speak Low
Nardis
Emily
Darn That Dream
Dear Old Stockholm
Conception
Freedom Jazz Dance
Three Little Words
This Can't Be Love
Whisper Not
Bolivia
Beatrice
 

MG1127

Well-known member
Great additions and comments from Todd

I’ll add the more tunes you listen to and become familiar with the more you’ll realize that many have very similar forms and changes.

that is one of the reasons why they get called so often ... the less you have to think the better everyone will play.

this is why you rarely if ever hear something like Joshua get called at a jam night.

I always encourage drummers who are interested in this topic to learn the chord changes to tunes that really appeal to you on another instrument... piano ... guitar ... whatever
Then learn to sing the melody over the changes.

you’ll immediately find that you approach the tune differently when sitting behind the drums.

approach the music as if you are a piano player and not some robot who is expected to mark time and nothing more.

play music don’t hit drums and cymbals
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
Thanks again for the feedback and suggestions. I've incorporated the new songs posted. I appreciate everyone's suggestions and insights. I also appreciate the fact that no one thinks or has taken this as a "must do it this way" type post, but as a suggested resource for schlubs such as myself.

edited to add: The first 100 list has different colored text due to the links that were on the original list I pulled from. If anyone has links to their or the preferred version of a song, please post it and I'll update the list. The more useful it is to others, the better.
 
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MG1127

Well-known member
Many of those tunes. i.e. Autumn Leaves, Days of Wine and Roses, All of Me, Ipanema, In The Mood, etc. etc. are popular tunes, not jazz.
Those tunes get called on jazz gigs all the time.
I don’t think I was ever hired for a restaurant or corporate gig where Autumn Leaves and All of Me were not called
 

jansara

Junior Member
Those get called on jazz gigs all the time, or on casuals with jazz musicians. Certainly all jazz musicians know them.

Except In The Mood-- which you do have to play sometimes, on bad gigs...
Any number of these pop standards can be given a jazz interpretation. The same can be said for the Beatles' catalog or any other popular song. When they do get called it's more out of recognition of the listener's comfort zone. I can't remember doing any pop standards in a jazz concert setting.
 
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